Tom Burke - Global Youth Work: Where are we going?

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Slides from presentation by Tom Burke, Director of Global Youth Work at Y Care International, speaking at the Fresh Directions in Global Youth Work conference.
March 17th 2010 at YMCA George Williams College

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Tom Burke - Global Youth Work: Where are we going?

  1. 1. Global Youth Work: Where are we going? Tom Burke Director of Global Youth Work Y Care International @tomburke / @ycareint www.ycareinternational.org/gyw facebook.com/ YCareInternational
  2. 2. Where have we come from?
  3. 3. Funding and resources – youth service <ul><li>1995: </li></ul><ul><li>“ The youth service in many parts of the country has taken a considerable battering over the last few years. In some local authorities it barely exists. There is fear of further cuts and with it increasingly low morale” </li></ul>Bourne, D and McCollum, A. (1995) A World of Difference London: Development Education Association (Pg. 88) Tim Laughton (2011) Tim Loughton Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families at the launch of the Positive for Youth Summit, 09 March 2011, Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London 2011: “ We’re all very aware that youth services are under a great deal of pressure at the moment. And in straitened economic times, youth services are sadly bearing the brunt of many cuts. That is the unfortunate reality we face and there is no ducking it.”
  4. 4. <ul><li>1995: </li></ul><ul><li> “ The Labour government in 1970s established a development education fund… The Conservative government withdrew the fund for a combination of political and financial reasons… “ </li></ul><ul><li>“ Little evidence to suggest national government is prepared to give resources and support to [GYW]” </li></ul>Funding and resources – gyw Bourne, D and McCollum, A. (1995) A World of Difference London: Development Education Association (Pg. 18 and 88) DFID (2010) Mitchell: Immediate freeze on DFID UK-based 'awareness' projects DFID Press Release 17 th May 2010 Andrew Mitchell (2010) Andrew Mitchell , Secretary of State for International Development speaking in House of Commons, International Development Questions, Wednesday 13 October 2010 HoC Hansard 13 Oct 2010 : Column 311 2010: “ Immediate freeze on DFID UK-based 'awareness' projects” “ I do not think that British taxpayers' hard-earned money meant for development should be spent in the UK. It should be spent helping the poorest in the world.”
  5. 5. <ul><li>1996: </li></ul><ul><li> “ There is a lack of clarity of the term ‘development education’ and a low profile for this work within youth work agencies… The need for clear definition of ‘internationalism’, ‘development education’ or ‘global youth work’ was expressed by some workers...” </li></ul><ul><li>2009: </li></ul><ul><li>“ The term global youth work is too formal and in itself can create a barrier.” </li></ul><ul><li>2010: </li></ul><ul><li>“ The terminology of global youth work …is perceived to be unclear and not accessible to practitioners … and possibly those who may consider it.” </li></ul>Language matters… Jospeh, J. and Hope,. P. (1996) Global youth work: A Practice resource manual DRAFT DEA Global Youth Work Training Advisory Service Cotton, N. (2009) Global Youth Work in the UK: Research Report Development Education Authority Adams, P. (2010) A Mapping of Global Youth Work Cass Education School, University of East London or the Development Education Association
  6. 6. Are we really informal educators? <ul><li>2007 </li></ul><ul><li>“ Global Youth Work is informal education with young people that uses youth work methodology to encourage a critical understanding of the links between personal, local and global issues. It seeks young people’s active participation in bringing about change towards greater equity and justice.” </li></ul><ul><li>2010: </li></ul><ul><li>“ Based on this research there is little evidence of what can strictly be defined as informal education in the global youth work sector” </li></ul>DEA. (2007) Global Youth Work: A resource and training manual Development Education Association Adams, P. (2010) A Mapping of Global Youth Work Cass Education School, University of East London or the Development Education Association
  7. 7. An absence of values? <ul><li>1995 </li></ul><ul><li>“ The definition implies that development education is more than just learning about the Third World or the South. It is value laden and recognises that development educationalists believe in the principle of fairness, tolerance, justice, equity and co-operation.” </li></ul><ul><li>2011: </li></ul><ul><li>How often do we explicitly talk about our values and the type of society we wish to see? </li></ul><ul><li>Has the language of “active citizenship” and “participation” become too depoliticised? </li></ul>Bourne, D and McCollum, A. (1995) A World of Difference London: Development Education Association (Pg. 18 and 88)
  8. 8. Marginalisation of identity <ul><li>1995 </li></ul><ul><li>“ Amongst some black youth workers there are also suspicions of the motives of development educationalists…. [Dev Ed] is seen as being worthy but white and middle class; speaking on behalf of oppressed peoples but not engaging with them.” </li></ul><ul><li>2011: </li></ul><ul><li>Where are the views and voices of minority groups? </li></ul><ul><li>How integrated are issues of identity to our work? </li></ul><ul><li>How gender sensitive is our practice? </li></ul>Bourne, D and McCollum, A. (1995) A World of Difference London: Development Education Association (Pg. 18 and 88)
  9. 9. Emerging challenges <ul><li>In defence of outcomes… </li></ul><ul><li>The weakened position of youth work in local authorities </li></ul><ul><li>Values in society are changing </li></ul><ul><li>The imminent erosion of citizenship education </li></ul><ul><li>An erosion of support for multiculturalism in policy and a belief that “equality” is done </li></ul><ul><li>Backlash to politicisation of young people by workers </li></ul>
  10. 10. Where are we going? <ul><li>To be more flexible and innovative with our resources and our partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>To keep a strong focus on young people </li></ul><ul><li>To be more honest about our practice </li></ul><ul><li>To communicate clearly and concisely </li></ul><ul><li>To be more bold about our values and outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>To ensure that the views and voices of minority and marginalised groups come to the fore </li></ul>
  11. 11. Fresh Directions in Global Youth Work

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