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Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013
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Yale-Tulane ESF- 8 Special Report - Moore OK Tornado - 22 May 2013

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  • 1. SITUATIONSITUATIONYALE - TULANE ESF-8 SPECIAL REPORTYALE - TULANE ESF-8 SPECIAL REPORTMOOREMOORE OKLAHOMA - TORNADOOKLAHOMA - TORNADOSITUATION MAPSITUATION MAPFEDERAL GOVERNMENTFEMATWITTER | FACEBOOK | YOUTUBE | BLOGHHSPUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY – ASPRTWITTER | FACEBOOKCDCTWITTER | FACEBOOKNATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WEATHER FORECAST OFFICE, NORMANOAA NATIONAL SEVERE STORMS LABORATORYEPAORGANIZATIONAMERICAN RED CROSSSALVATION ARMYOKLAHOMATWITTER | FACEBOOKAS OF 22 May 2013, 0900 HRSINJURED DEAD237 24HEALTH AND SAFETYCONSIDERATIONS AFTER A TORNADODISASTER DISTRESSHEALTH AND MEDICALHEALTH AND MEDICALOKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENTTWITTER | FACEBOOKOKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETYOKLAHOMA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHOKLAHOMA VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTERSTATE GOVERNMENTOTHER RESOURCESDIMRC - TornadoesOKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITYINITIAL DAMAGE SURVEY MAPFEDERAL RESPONSEFEDERAL RESPONSEBACKGROUNDBACKGROUNDSHELTER AND MASS CARESHELTER AND MASS CAREWEATHER
  • 2. BACKGROUNDWHERE: MOORE OKLAHOMA AND SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES• START LOCATION: Newcastle/Grady County, OK• END LOCATION : Moore OK/Cleveland County, OKWHEN: 20 MAY 2013• START TIME: 2:45 PM CDT• END TIME: 3:35 PM CDTWHAT: On Monday, 20 May 2013, beginning at 2:45 PM CDT forapproximately 50 minutes, an EF-5 Tornado impacted the towns ofMoore, Newcastle, and southern portions of Oklahoma City, causingwidespread destruction.• RATING: EF-5• PEAK WINDS: 200-210 MPH• PATH LENGTH: 17 Miles• PATH WIDTH: 1.3 Miles• DURATION: Approximately 50 minutes on the groundINJURED: 237 people were injured. The injuries include 148individuals who sustained cuts or pierces, 85 individuals who werestruck by objects, and four individuals who were struck by vehiclesand/or other large objects.DEAD: 24 people were killed by the storm. Nine of the fatalities werechildren.
  • 3. SITUATION MAPSOURCE: NYT
  • 4. INITIAL DAMAGE SURVEY MAP
  • 5. SITUATIONDue to widespread tornado damage, the State EmergencyOperations Center remains activatedDAMAGES:•Plaza Towers Elementary School and Briarwood Elementary Schooltook direct hits•Moore Medical Center, sustained direct hit•Approximately 2400 homes have been damaged or destroyed•The Federal Emergency Management Agency is assisting OEM in theprocess of assessing damage to structures. The assessment is ongoing due tothe wide scope of damage sustained in the affected area.SCHOOLS: Classes at Moore Public Schools have been canceled forthe remainder of the school year. Graduations will continue asplannedTRANSPORTATION: Northbound and southbound lanes of Interstate35 through Moore have been reopened. However, the public isencouraged to avoid the area if at all possible. All I-35 off ramps inthe Moore area remain closed.DECLARATIONS:•Governor Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency for Oklahoma•On 20 May 2013, President Obama declared major disaster exists inthe State of Oklahoma, and offered federal aid to those impacted inthe following counties: Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, andPottawatomie, with funding for hazard mitigation measures availablestatewide.WATER:• The power is back on at the Draper Water Treatment Plant.Residents and businesses will soon see the water pressure return tonormal.•As water quality crews bring the water system, they will flush thepipelines and monitor the water quality.•The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality has no reasonto believe the water in the pipeline is unsafe to drink. However,those who completely lost water service or whose homes sustainedstructural damage are encouraged to voluntarily boil water beforeconsumption as a voluntary precautionary measure.OKLAHOMA NATIONAL GUARD: The Oklahoma NationalGuard remains activated, with 122 members deployed in 46 vehiclesthroughout the area. The Guard is also assisting with providingdrinking water to the area.OKLAHOMA HIGHWAY PATROL: Reports 86 law enforcementpersonnel from state and federal agencies on 49 perimetercheckpoints.CITY OF MOORE: Officials report they have enough responders onscene at this time, and ask that additional resources and volunteersplease stay away from the affected area unless specificallyrequested.
  • 6. SHELTERS AND MASS CAREAMERICAN RED CROSS: An estimated 306 individuals are inAmerican Red Cross shelters. The American Red Cross has openedthe following shelters:• St. Andrews United Methodist Church - 2727 SW 119,Oklahoma City• Newcastle Storm Shelter - 851 N Carr, Newcastle• Moore Community Center - 201 S Howard, Moore• First Baptist Church of Moore - 301 NE 27thSt., Moore• The American Red Cross encourages the use of theirwebsite, www.safeandwell.org, which is designed to helpfamily and friends reunite.• Additionally, the following American Red Cross shelters fromSunday remain open:• Carney Senior Center - 301 Maple Avenue, Carney• Shawnee High School Athletic Center - 1001 N Kennedy,Shawnee• Little Axe Resource Center - 1970 156 Ave NE, NormanOU: The University of Oklahoma Housing & Food Services is openfor those displaced by the tornadoes. For more information, pleasecall 405-325-2511.FEED THE CHILDREN: Feed The Children will be acceptingdonations of diapers, canned goods, non-perishable food and snackitems, water and sports drinks, and cash donations at the followinglocations in Oklahoma City:1. McCormick Warehouse at 29 N McCormick from 8:30 a.m. to4:30 p.m.2. First Baptist Church at 1201 N Robinson3. KOCO at 1300 W Britton Road4. Faith Tabernacle Church at I-40 and PortlandSALVATION ARMY:•The Salvation Army had five canteens deployed to the Moorearea Tuesday afternoon, with two more en route.•The Salvation Army is coordinating with Southern Baptist DisasterRelief for meal preparation for the Salvation Army and AmericanRed Cross to then distribute.AMERICORPS: The Joplin chapter of AmeriCorps was en route toassist in response efforts on Tuesday afternoon.SOUCRE: OEM SITUATION UPDATE 4 MAY 21, 2013 10 P.M Orlando Sentinel.TYSON FOODS: is providing disaster relief support. Thecompany’s Meals that Matter™ disaster relief trailer and cookingteams from several Tyson plant locations arrived in Moore onTuesday to begin providing meals to victims and relief workers.Depending upon the need, the trailer and cooking teams couldbe on site two to three weeksFeeding ChildrenEverywhere warehouse inLongwood , FL fillthousands of small plasticbags with lentils, rice anddehydrated vegetables .The Bank of Americavolunteers packaged thenearly 7,000 baggies —enough for almost 21,000meals — into cardboardboxes. The food will beshipped to Oklahoma Cityto help feed the thousandsof people left homeless bythis weeks tornado
  • 7. FEDERAL RESPONSEFEDERAL RESPONSEDISASTER SURVIVOR ASSISTANCE TEAMS:• Three Disaster Survivor Assistance Teams arrived on 21 MAY 2013to perform the Assess, Inform, and Report (AIR) Missions, a tool tohelp federal, state, local, tribal and territorial partners gatherdetailed information on the affected areas during the critical firsthours, days and weeks after a disaster strikes.• DSATs will address immediate and emerging needs of disastersurvivors including: on-site registration, applicant status checks, on-the-spot needs assessments, and access to partners offeringsurvivor services.NATIONAL RESPONSE COORDINATION CENTER FEMA activated theNational Response Coordination Center in Washington, D.C., amulti-agency coordination center that provides overallcoordination of the federal response to natural disasters andemergencies, to support state requests for assistance.FEMA’S REGION VI RESPONSE COORDINATION CENTER (RRCC)located in Denton, Texas remains activated.PRELIMINARY DAMAGE ASSESSMENT TEAMS: Preliminarydamage assessment teams, comprised of representatives from thestate, FEMA and the Small Business Administration, are on theground and began their assessments on 21 May 2013SEARCH AND RESCUE: Three national Urban Search and RescueTeams (Texas Task Force 1, Nebraska Task Force 1 and TennesseeTask Force 1) and an Incident Support Team have been deployedto support the immediate response efforts.INCIDENT MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE TEAMS: One national andtwo regional IMATs are deployed to the state emergencyoperations center in Oklahoma City to coordinate with state andlocal officials in support of recovery operations.FCO: Sandy Coachman has been named as the FederalCoordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in theaffected area.MOBILE EMERGENCY RESPONSE SUPPORT: Two MobileEmergency Response Support Teams are in Oklahoma to provideself-sustaining telecommunications, logistics, and operationssupport elements, to assist in the immediate response needs andadditional teams are being deployed.SOURCE: FEMA BLOG – 21 MAY 2013
  • 8. HEALTH AND MEDICALHEALTH AND MEDICALMENTAL HEALTH•The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance AbuseServices (ODMHSAS) has established an emergency response centerwithin the tornado disaster zone in Moore at the Cleveland CountyHealth Department, 424 S Eastern Ave. in Moore.•ODMHSAS is also coordinating volunteer efforts and providingmandatory training for behavioral health professionals wishing toassist with services for those in need.•Licensed mental health professionals, certified case managers orcertified recovery support specialists who would like to assistvictims should call (405) 522-3908.•To be admitted into the disaster zone, volunteers must havereceived training and hold a valid identification badge. Badges willbe issued by the ODMHSAS at the completion of training.TETANUS SHOTS: The Oklahoma City-County Health Departmentwill be offering tetanus shots to rescue workers, volunteers andresidents in affected areas.SOURCE: FEMA BLOG – 21 MAY 2013HOSPITALSMoore Hospital was damaged by the tornado Monday. Thirteenpatients were transported to area hospitals.Due to low water pressure Tuesday, Oklahoma Heart Hospital Southrelocated 14 patients.A Moore MedicalCenter patient sitsin the parking lotafter a tornadodamaged thehospital onMonday. SOURCE:Alonzo Adams/APOKLAHOMA MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS (OKMRCIndividuals who want to volunteer to help with disaster reliefshould register on the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps (OKMRC)website at www.okmrc.org. OKMRC is designed to bring togetherdifferent healthcare-related organizations and members of thecommunity, including physicians, nurses, public health workers,and other medical professionals. In addition, volunteers without abackground in medical training are needed.Aerial photo showsdamage to MooreMedical Center.SOURCE:AP Photo/Steve Gooch
  • 9. HEALTH AND SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS AFTER A TORNADOINJURIES•Injury may result from the direct impact of a tornado, or it may occur afterward when people walkamong debris and enter damaged buildings.•A study of injuries after a tornado in Marion, Illinois, showed that 50 percent of the tornado-relatedinjuries were suffered during rescue attempts, cleanup, and other post-tornado activities.GENERAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS•Monitor battery-powered radio or television for emergency information.•Be careful when entering any structure that has been damaged.•Wear sturdy shoes or boots, long sleeves, and gloves when handling or walking on or near debris.•Be aware of hazards from exposed nails and broken glass.•Do not touch downed power lines or objects in contact with downed lines. Report electrical hazardsto the police and the utility company.•Use battery-powered lanterns.•Never use generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline, propane, natural gas,or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, garage, or camper—or even outside nearan open window, door, or vent. Carbon monoxide (co)--an odorless, colorless gas that can causesudden illness and death if you breathe it--from these sources can build up in your home, garage, orcamper and poison the people and animals inside. Seek prompt medical attention if you suspect COpoisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseated.•Hang up displaced telephone receivers that may have been knocked off by the tornado, but stay offthe telephone, except to report an emergency.•Cooperate fully with public safety officials.During a tornado, people face hazards from extremely high windsand risk being struck by flying and falling objects. After a tornado,the wreckage left behind poses additional injury risks•Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – TornadoesInformation on what to do to safeguard your health and safetyprior to, during and after a tornado• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Clean UpSafely After a Disaster Information from the Centers for DiseaseControl and Prevention (CDC) to assist individuals, families andrescue workers with safe and proper methods of disaster clean up.Topics include carbon monoxide exposure, chain saw injuries,chemical hazards, smoke from burning debris, electrical hazards,and cleaning and sanitizing with bleach.• BusinessUSA - Disaster Cleanup Disaster clean up resources toassist business owners determine the most responsible clean upand disposal methods, and how best to protect employees duringthe recovery process.•BusinessUSA - Tornado Preparedness - A checklist to prepare yourbusiness before, during, and after a tornado• Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) - TornadoPreparedness and Response is designed to help businesses andtheir employees prepare for tornadoes, and to provide informationabout hazards that workers may face in the aftermath of atornado.
  • 10. SIGNS OF EMOTIONAL DISTRESS RELATED TO TORNADOES AND SEVERE STORM•Eating or sleeping too much or too little•Pulling away from people and things•Having low or no energy•Feeling numb or like nothing matters•Having unexplained aches and pains like constant stomachaches or headaches•Feeling helpless or hopeless•Excessive smoking, drinking or using drugs (including prescription medication)•Feeling unusually confused or forgetful•Worrying a lot of the time; feeling guilty but not sure why•Feeling like you have to keep busy•Hyper-vigilant- constantly thinking that something is going to happen, includingwhen forecasts for any storm are issued whether or not they have the chance toproduce tornadoes or other severe weather•Constant yelling or fighting with family and friends; irritable*•Having thoughts and memories related to the storm that you cant seem to get outof your head; nightmares•Triggers such as sights or sounds that take you back to the storm; sweating orheart racing when you experience these triggers•Unable to perform daily tasks like taking care of your kids or other dependents,trouble showing up to work or school on time or at all (excessive absences), troubleconcentrating and getting things done, etc.•Thinking of hurting or killing yourself or someone else.Severe storms that produce tornadoes, strong wind gusts, lightning strikes, flash floods and other damaging effects can triggeremotional distress in those that experience them: survivors in impacted areas (including children and teens), loved ones of victims,those who have suffered damaged to or who have lost completely residential or business property, and first responders, rescue &recovery workers are all at risk.DISTRESS SYMPTOMS AFTER A TORNADODisaster Distress Helpline1-800-985-5990 orText TalkWithUs to 66746TTY for Deaf/Hearing Impaired:1-800-846-8517Feeling stressed?If you or someone you know has been affected by a disaster and needs immediateassistance, please call this toll-free number for information, support, and counseling. Youwill be connected to the nearest crisis center.Information and Referrals Within Tornado or Severe Storm-Impacted Areas: Thenational 2-1-1 system offers up-to-the-minute, local, disaster-specific information andresources. Visit http://www.211.org to locate a center serving a tornado or severe storm-impacted area or just dial 2-1-1.SOURCE: SAMHSA – Disaster DistressA boy is pulled from beneath a collapsed wall at the Plaza Towers Elementary School following a tornadoin Moore, Okla., Monday, May 20, 2013. Sue Ogrocki | AP
  • 11. TORNADOES• Nature’s most violent storms. Spawned from powerful thunderstorms,tornadoes can cause fatalities and devastate a neighborhood in seconds.• Appears as a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud that extends from athunderstorm to the ground with whirling winds that can reach 300 miles perhour.• Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long.• Occasionally, tornadoes develop so rapidly that little, if any, advance warningis possible.• Before a tornado hits, the wind may die down and the air may become verystill.• A cloud of debris can mark the location of a tornado even if a funnel is notvisible. Tornadoes generally occur near the trailing edge of a thunderstorm. Itis not uncommon to see clear, sunlit skies behind a tornado.NOTE: The EnhancedFujita Scale,implemented inFebruary 2007, is usedby meteorologists torate tornado damage ona scale from EF0 to EF5.The EF Scaleincorporates moredamage indicators anddegrees of damage thanthe original Fujita Scale,allowing more detailedanalysis and bettercorrelation betweendamage and windspeed.DESTRUCTIVE VORTEXRotating winds inside a super cell may spawn tornadoes. The tornado that hitMoore, Okla., on Monday was particularly large and powerful.Unstableconditionsproduce anupdraft of warm,moist airAs the storm forms,cooler air wrapping infrom behind causes therising air to spin. This iscalled a mesocyclone.As the mesocycloneintensifies, it mayproduce violentrotating winds at thesurface — a tornado.Severe weather is common in the Plains in late spring along the so-called dryline, where cool, dry air from the Rockies meets warm, moist air from the Gulfof Mexico.SOURCE: Ready.govWHY SO MANY TORNADOES NEAROKLAHOMA CITY?

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