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SACA Annual Report 09/10
 

SACA Annual Report 09/10

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    SACA Annual Report 09/10 SACA Annual Report 09/10 Presentation Transcript

    • 2009 / 2010 Annual Report Singapore After Care Association
    • contents 01 The Fruit of Labour: Our People our mission 08 The Fruit of Life: Our Supportive Donors and Volunteers To reintegrate discharged offenders into society. our objectives 14 The Fruit of Love: Our Activities To help offenders cope with their incarceration, and their families deal with problems arising from it. To create a safe environment by facilitating the 40 The Fruit of Longevity: Our Finances reintegration of discharged offenders into their families and the society, and providing social work intervention aimed at reducing chances of recidivism. To create a conducive environment for the return of discharged offenders through public education and involvement of volunteers. fruit /fru t/ that which is produced; the effect or consequence of any action; advantageous or desirable product or result; disadvantageous or evil consequence or effect; as, the fruits of labour, of hope, of love.
    • The Fruit of Labour: Our People Chairman’s Message Members of SACA Organisation and Programme Chart The Team Leading the Way “The fight is never about grapes or lettuce. It is always about people. “ Cesar Chavez
    • PATRON SACA VOLUNTEER LEADERS COMMITTEE Associate Professor Ho Peng Kee, Mr Allan Au Wan Leung Senior Minister of State for Law & Home Affairs Mr Vinod Balagopal Mr Seet Poh Ms Adeline Choi Lai Kuen Ms May Hui EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Ms Poh Hwee Hian Chairman Mr Jeffrey E S Beh Ms Janet Lau Bo Chu Vice-Charirman Mr Lakshmanan s/o Seenivasakan Hon Secretary Ms Jennifer Marie Asst Hon Secretary Mr Roy Neighbour Hon Treasurer Mr Ong Hian Sun Asst Hon Treasurer Mr Winston Cheng TRUSTEES OF THE ASSOCIATION’S PREMISES Members Mr Masadi Masdawi The trustees of the Association’s premises at 81 Dunlop Street, Singapore Mr Joseph Chia Hock Song 209408 are Mr Sowaran Singh and Mr Bala Reddy. Mdm Phang Seok Sieng Dr Teng Su Ching Dr Hyekyung Choo HONORARY AUDITOR K S Ng & Co., Certified Public Accountants, continued to play the role of SACA’s Honorary Auditor during FY 2009/2010. MINISTRY REPRESENTATIVES Prisons Department Ms Sho Fee Leng The Executive Committee records its appreciation to Dr K S Ng and his staff Singapore Police Force DSP Tan Yong Hong for their kind contribution and support for SACA. STAFF COMMITTEE Chairman Mr Jeffrey E S Beh Members Mr Lakshmanan s/o Seenivasakan Ms Jennifer Marie Mr Roy Neighbour Mr Ong Hian Sun AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 2 CA
    • Chairman’s Message I discovered an interesting fact recently about something I thought I knew all about – apples. The apple is a fruit that is frequently associated with ex-offenders with the analogy of the rotten apple one that is often used to characterise them. However, I learnt that if you cut an apple sideways, you see that the core is actually formed in the shape of a star – so even a rotten apple has a star inside it waiting to come out. Another eventful year has passed and For the year in review, more than sors for their generous sponsorships I am pleased to see several new 2,200 ex-offenders and their family and all donors for donating towards initiatives being implemented for the members utilised and benefited our cause. Special mention has to be various programmes for ex-offenders from SACA’s programmes and serv- made of Lee Foundation Singapore, and their families being successfully ices. The services rendered have the President’s Challenge (2009), carried through. The details of these been made possible by the dedica- the Yellow Ribbon Fund, Super can be found in the following pages. tion of the staff as well as the ever Galvanising Pte. Ltd., as well as the increasing ranks of committed and Singapore Totalisator Board for their What I would like to highlight is the enthusiastic volunteers that the continued generosity in supporting efforts that we have embarked on to Association can call upon. the Association. help the people who are helping this client-group. Pages thirty-seven to The programmes too have been Last but not least, I record my heartfelt thirty-nine detail the various initia- reviewed over the course of the year appreciation to the Prison Service, the tives the Association has undertaken so as to ensure that they remain National Council of Social Service, and together with the Prison Service with relevant and new enrichment the Singapore Corporation of Rehabili- regards to training and facilitating activities have been incorporated so tative Enterprises. Beyond providing a as to further enhance the services substantial amount of funding for the prison staff as well as volunteers in provided for our clientele. various programmes, their continued the aftercare sector in their untiring support and guidance have been efforts to reconnect ex-offenders and The current uncertain economic situa- instrumental in enabling SACA to carry their families with the community at tion has made it more difficult for out the initiatives detailed in this large. In the last quarter of the year voluntary welfare organisations like Report. alone these initiatives have benefitted SACA to raise funds. Despite this, I am some 131 volunteers from over two happy to report that we have been dozen VWOs and religious organisa- able to lower our costs as compared to tions as well as 35 prison staff in their the previous year and record a modest new role in supervised aftercare. surplus. I thank all our corporate spon- Jeffery E.S. Beh CHAIRMAN CA SA 0 1 9/ 3 AR 0
    • Members of SACA Life Members 1 Mr Abdul Rahim B Jalil 36 Mr Kandasamy Chandra Kumar 71 Mr Ng Royston 106 Mr Teo Tze Fang 2 Mr Adnan Abdullah 37 Mr Kane, George 72 Ms Norul Huda Rashid 107 Mr Toh Han Li 3 Mr Amir Singh 38 Ms Khong Phui Sheong, Eileen 73 Mr Ong Hian Sun 108 Mr Toh Hoe Kok, Francis 4 Mr Ang Kheng Leng 39 Mr Khoo Kim Leng, David 74 Mr Ong Kar Imm 109 Mr Tseng, Francis 5 Mr Arul Selvamalar 40 Mr Khoo Oon Soo 75 Ms Ong, Jocelyn 110 Ms V R Cary 6 Mr Bala Reddy 41 Ms Koh Chai Yim 76 Mr Ooi Keng Hock, Roy 111 Mr Vinod BalaGopal 7 Ms Baljit Kaur Nijar 42 Mr Kong Sui Khian, Richard 77 Mr P O Ram 112 Ms Wang Lan Jee, Janet 8 Mr Beh E S, Jeffrey 43 Mr Koshy, Thomas 78 Mr P Sivasanmugam 113 Mr Wong Cheng Liang 9 Mr Boby S. Kappen 44 Mr Lau Wing Yum 79 Mr Pattabiran Nagarajan 114 Mr Wong Kok Chin 10 Mr Chen Saii Lih, Patrick 45 Mr Lakshmanan s/o Seenivasakan 80 Ms Peh Cheng Hong 115 Mr Wong Kok Weng 11 Mr Cheng, Winston 46 Mr Lee Bian Tian 81 Mdm Phang Seok Sieng 116 Ms Wong Kum Foong, Ada 12 Ms Cheong Wai Leng, Kristine 47 Ms Lee, Christine 82 Mr Poh Geok Ek 117 Mrs Wong Rita 13 Mr Chia Hock Song, Joseph 48 Ms Lee Kwai Sem 83 Dr R D Gangatharan 118 Mr Wong Seng Yoong, Jason 14 Mr Chin Kim Tham, Desmond 49 Ms Lee Liang Chian 84 Ms R K Rani 119 Mrs Yang Chiou Chyn 15 Dr Choo Hyekyung 50 Ms Lee May Fen, Frances 85 Mrs Roberta Lyn BalaGopal 16 Mr Chua Poh Heng, Jordan 51 Mrs Lee Poh Choo 86 Mr Roy Neighbour 17 Mr Devadas Emmanuel Devapragasam 52 Mr Lee Sing Lit 87 Mr S Surenthiraraj 18 Mr Edgar Troxler 53 Mrs Leu Li Lin 88 Ms Saraswathi Raja Krishnan Ordinary Members 19 Mr Edmond Pereira 54 Mr Lim Aeng Cheng, Charles 89 Mdm Saroja d/o Kanthasamy 1 Mr Mahadevan Lukshumayeh 20 Mr Edwin Thompson 55 Mr Lim Beng Huat, James 90 Mr Shahiran Bin Abdul Rahman 2 Ms Ravneet Kaur 21 Ms Goh Meibo Guilini, Grace 56 Mr Lim Ewe Huat 91 Mr Shahril Bin Abdul Ghani 22 Mr Goh Sin Chan 57 Mr Lim Han Boon 92 Mr Shaiful Bahari B Sidi 23 Mdm Goh Suat Cheng 58 Mr Lim Kah Keng 93 Dr Sim Boon Wee Timothy 24 Mr Hamidul Haq 59 Mr Lim Peck Guan 94 Mr Sowaran Singh 25 Mr Hamzah Moosa 60 Ms Low Chui Hong 95 Mr T S Sinnathuray 26 Mr Ho Beng Guan 61 Mr Low Hwee Huang 96 Mrs Tai, Mable 27 Ms Huen Suling, Joyce 62 Ms Low Lee Kiang, Jasmine 97 Mr Tan Boon Teck 28 Mr Ismail Ibrahim 63 Justice M P H Rubin 98 Mr Tan Ho Ping 29 Ms Jasbendar Kaur 64 Mr Masadi Masdawi 99 Mr Tan Hock Yam 30 Dr Jasmine S Chan 65 Mr Mathavan Devadas 100 Mr Tan Hye Teck, Richard 31 Mr Jaswant Singh 66 Mr Muhammad Hidhir B A Majid 101 Dr Tan Ngoh Tiong 32 Ms Jennifer Marie 67 Ms Murugappa Chettiar Sundaravalli 102 Mr Tan Siong Thye 33 Mr K C Vijayan 68 Mr Narajen Singh 103 Mdm Tang Lai Hong 34 Mr K V Veloo 69 Mr Narayasamy s/o Gobal 104 Mr Tang Soong Jing Stanley 35 Ms Kamala Ponnampalam 70 Mr Ng Cheng Thiam 105 Dr Teng Su Ching AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 4 CA
    • Organisation & Programme Chart EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE WITH MINISTRY REPRESENTATIVES DIRECTOR DEPUTY DIRECTOR / SENIOR CASE MANAGER CASE EX OFFENDERS EDUCATION VOLUNTEER TRAINING ADMIN, MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE SUPPORT AFTER CARE & ACCOUNTS, FRAMEWORK SCHEME PROGRAMME PROGRAMME RESEARCH HR & PROGRAMME EAS ESP VAP FUNDRAISING CMFP SOCIAL AFTER CARE SOCIAL SENIOR MANAGER, MANAGER WORKERS OFFICER WORKER SOCIAL COMMUNICATIONS WORKER & PARTNERSHIPS CASE CASE PROGRAMME PROGRAMME ADMIN MANAGERS MANAGER CO ORDINATORS CO ORDINATOR OFFICER ASSISTANT CASE MANAGER CA SA 0 1 9/ 5 AR 0
    • The Team First Row (left to right): Priya Arul (Deputy Director), Goh Guat Tiang (Social Worker), Nur Elviana Binte Mohamed Salleh (Case Manager), Noor Haslinda Bte Mohd So’od (Manager, Volunteer Programme), Nur Amalya Binte Ahmad (Programme Coordinator). Second Row (left to right): Monica Ma (Case Manager), Punitha Gunasegaran (Case Manager), Nur Farhana Binte Che Yusof Ani (Social Worker), Lin Mingjie (Social Worker), Maygalai Tangarasu (Social Worker), Christine Ng (Manager, Communications and Partnerships), Noraishikin Binte Ismail (Programme Coordinator). Third Row (left to right): Quek Bee Geok (Case Manager), Eunice To (Assistant Case Manager), Jess Choo (Admin Officer), Dawn Yet (Senior Social Worker), Chua Boon Tee (After-Care Officer), Sebastian Choo (Programme Coordinator), Prem Kumar (Director). AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 6 CA
    • Leading the Way (Employee Training and Development) In an effort to upgrade skills and to enhance the services SACA provides, staff attended the following courses and seminars during the year. CASEWORK & COUNSELLING FUNDRAISING 1. Strengthening Social Service Response to the Economic Downturn 1. Making Sense of Fund-Raising 2. Criminal Law for NPOs 2. Impactful Fund-Raising: Effective Grant Proposals 3. Understanding the Rehabilitation Needs of Ex Drug Offenders and New Media Networking 4. Certificate in Para Counselling 3. Donor Outreach through Social Media 5. Helping Youths Cope with Anger 4. Leveraging on Social Media to Further Your Mission 6. Building Skills In High Risk Families 5. Marketing & Branding for NPOs 7. Clinical Supervision 8. Helping People Through Energy Psychology FINANCIAL / HR 9. Window on Addictions 1. Salary & Payroll Administration for NPOs 10. Counselling Skills & Practice: Introduction (Mandarin) 11. Intentional Counselling & Interviewing VOLUNTEERING WORK 12. Helping Ex Offenders Make Career Choices 1. The Volunteer Investment & Value Audit (VIVA) Model: 13. Gambling Addictions: Assessment, Brief Interventions & Evaluating Your Volunteer Programmes Community Referrals 14. Introduction to Community Based Services (Family Services) OTHERS 15. Addiction Counsellor Training Course 1. Real Leadership Training 16. Professional Development Seminar: Making Assessments 2. Work-Life Forum: Creating Flexible and Effective Workplaces in Social Work Practice 3. Report & Proposal Writing for NPO Managers and Executives 17. Criminology Workshop 4. Instructional Design For NPOs 18. 1st APBAM 2010 Asia Pacific Behavioural & 5. Social Icon 2009 Addiction Medicine Conference 6. Social Services: Perspectives for the next 10 years 19. Cultural Sensitivity in Working with Malay Muslim Families – 7. Unleashing the Potential of Excel: Achieve Breakthrough Understanding Worldview and Working Effectively Performance in Donor/Client Database Management for NPOs 20. Offenders with Mental Disorders Training: Psychiatric Rehabilitation 8. “Train-the-Trainer” Training for After Care Managers CA SA 0 1 9/ 7 AR 0
    • The Fruit of Life: Our supportive Donors and Volunteers Donors of SACA (Individuals) Donors of SACA (Organisations) Volunteers of SACA “Not the fruit of experience, but experience itself, is the end. “ Walter Pater
    • List of Donors APRIL 2009 to MARCH 2010 We would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to the following individuals and organisations for their generous and much needed financial support. 1 A. Francis Xavier 28 Jennifer Marie 57 Mohamed Anis Arulmoli 85 Tan David 2 Azrahayu Binte Ahmad Afandi 29 Jogesh K.Doshi Sakaravarthi s/o Jamal 86 Tan Ee Ee 3 Beh Jeffrey 30 Joseph D'aranjo Mohinitheen 87 Tan Huan Tiow 4 Chan Chew Han 31 K.Narendran 58 Ng Yong Hui Christine 88 Tan Kok Hiang 5 Chan Priscilla 32 Kim Julian 59 Nooraini Mohd So'od 89 Tan Kok Hua 6 Chan Wah Teck Jeffrey 33 Khoo Dominic 60 Nor Ain Saleha A H 90 Tan Phillip 7 Chang Cha Yi 34 Kuah Hoe Wei 61 Ong Hian Sun 91 Tan Tiong Ann 8 Cheng Howe Ming Winston 35 Lakshmanan s/o 62 Ong-Ho Peck Hoon 92 Tan Valerie 9 Chew Sui Ping Deborah Seenivasakan 63 Ong Jin Hui Celine 93 Tan Zhi Aun 10 Chia Heng Wan, Eric 36 Lau Wing Yum 64 Pang Chin Fai Darren 94 Tan Zhi Quan Raymond 11 Chin Betty 37 Lee Zhen Hui 65 Peh Alvin 95 Tang Soong Jing Stanley 12 Chng Jit Koon 38 Leong Poh Chuen Philip 66 Mdm Phang Seok Sieng 96 Tay Jun Min 13 Chng Wan Yee Phyllis 39 Leow Soon Guan 67 Png Zhi Chong 97 Tay Marilyn 14 Choo Hyekyung 40 Li William 68 Poon Wena 98 Teng Su Ching 15 Chua Boon Tee 41 Lim Ah Boy 69 Prabhakaran s/o Krishnan 99 Teo Boon Hock 16 Chua Kim Guan Jansen 42 Lim Lay Keng 70 Prem Kumar 100 Teo Kelvin 17 Chua Seng Khim 43 Lim Boon Heng, Minister 71 Quek Chee Siong 101 Than Swee Song David 18 Chui Yonghui Anne 44 Lim Siong Susan 72 Quek Chun Hou Terence 102 Tong Joey 19 Edwin Thompson 45 Lim Soo Liang 73 Quek Rui Ting Simon 103 V.R. Cary 20 Ee Chye Hua 46 Loh Friederike 74 Sai Ram Nilgiri 104 Verena Thomas 21 Ee Ming Chong Derek 47 Loh Lian 75 San Mun Onn 105 Wong Keen Onn 22 Erduan Sofhian Bin Jaafar 48 Loh Ping Ling Trudy 76 See Siew Heok Jo-Ann 106 Xavien 23 Francis D'Cruz 49 Loh Yin May 77 Seng Kang Boon 107 Xiong Jialan Angelina 24 Hee Jian Hoong Lynus 50 Loo Kuen Feng 78 Sho Fee Ling 108 Yeo Hwee Peng Winnie 25 Ho Seng Foo 51 Low Lee Kiang 79 Sim Lindy 109 Yeo Lee Chye 26 Intan Suraya Binte Hajis 52 G. Arumugam 80 Sim Wei Lin Elsie 110 Yin Ling Jennifer 27 Jennifer Hazel de Souza 53 Masadi Bin Masdawi 81 Sng Hsueh Yun Tracy 111 Zaed Aziz 28 Jennifer Marie 54 Mathew Joseph 82 Soh Thye Kiat Terence 29 Jogesh K.Doshi 55 May Hui 83 Sum Tze Sheng CA 30 Joseph D'aranjo 56 Miguel Sgjurco 84 Tan PL Phyllis 0 SA 1 9/ 9 AR 0
    • List of Donors Organisations Organisations 9 Great Earth Construction Pte Ltd 10 Hong Leong Foundation 11 Hong Leong Holdings Ltd 12 Jebsen & Jessen Technology (S) Pte Ltd 13 Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple 14 North East Community Development Council www.supergalvanising.com 15 NTUC FairPrice Foundation Ltd 16 Orionis Technologies Pte Ltd The Tote Board funds both local projects, and those with an 17 Sands House Marketing international dimension in the 18 Scan-Bilt Pte Ltd areas of arts and culture, charity, 19 SCORE community development, education, and health and sports. 20 Sigford Pte Ltd Since 1968, about S$4 billion 21 The Fulcrum Point Pte Ltd dollars has been given toward 22 Trussco Pte Ltd the greater good of the Singapore community. 23 Wild Oats Pte Ltd The Club with a Heart Supporters Kuan Im Tng Temple 1 Asean Chess Academy (Joo Chiat) 2 Caelan & Sage 1. To cultivate the mind and body 3 Coca-Cola Pte Ltd through Taoist philosophies; 4 Kenko Holdings Pte Ltd 2. To accumulate merits and good karma through recitations of 5 MediaCorp Pte Ltd Buddhist mantras; and 6 Robinsons & Co. (Singapore) Pte Ltd 3. To apply Confucian etiquette 7 Singapore Polytechnic - School of Digital Media in everyday lives. and Info-communication Technology 8 That’s Printing Caring for you through food 9 United International Pictures 10 WMF Singapore Pte Ltd AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 10 CA
    • List of Volunteers as at 31st March 2010 1 MR ABULAIZI S/O MOHD NOOHU 36 MR CHIA HENG WAH ERIC 71 MR HANSAN NG 2 MR ABDUL RAHIMAN MOHAMED ILYAS 37 MS CHIN WEI CHING 72 MS HARIATI BTE ADAM 3 MR ADNAN ABDULLAH 38 MR CHIN YUEN LOKE ALEX 73 MR HO CHEOW KUANG JOHN 4 MR ALAGASAMY RAJU SUBRAMANIAM 39 MR CHING KOO LENG 74 MS HO MEI SEE BEL 5 MR ALI BIN SENIN 40 MR CHOI HON KUAN GREGORY 75 MR HO SIEW KWONG PHILLIP 6 MS ANNA MAGDALENE LEONG YUET KHENG 41 MS CHOI LAI KUEN ADELINE 76 MR HO WAI KEONG 7 MR AMIR SINGH 42 MS CHONG CHENG YEE ANDREA 77 MR HO YEW CHEONG 8 MS AMY DANIEL 43 MS CHONG GUAN HONG ALICE 78 MS HOON WEI CHING AGNES 9 MR ANDREW VEALE WILLIAM 44 MR CHONG KUM YUEN JEFFREY 79 MS IRDAWATI NALLS 10 MS ANGEL CHIENG HOE MING 45 MS CHONG LEE LEE 80 MS JASBEER KAUR D/O KISHEN SINGH 11 MS ANG EU ENG ALICE 46 MS CHONG LEE NAM 81 MS JEANIE ELIZA BINTE SULAIMAN 12 MS ANG HUI ESTHER 47 MS CHONG SECK PIN 82 MS JESSICA LAU LAY KOON 13 MS ANG KIM BUAY JOSEPHINE 48 MS CHRISTINA PHILLIPS 83 MR JESWANT SINGH BANDAL 14 MS ANITA ZAHRA VELAR 49 MS CHU KER MIN JOSEPHINE 84 MR JOSEMARIA MIGUEL YAP SOON KWEE 15 MR ANTHONY LAWRENCE 50 MS CHUA AIK WHEE HANNAH 85 MR JOSEPH ROZARIO 16 MR ANTHONY SAMY FRANCIS XAVIER 51 MS CHUA ANNE 86 MR K JAYSEILAN 17 MS ARULSELVI D/O S SELVARAJU 52 MS CHUA KIM NAYAUDREY 87 MS KAN YOKE CHENG WINNIE 18 MR AU WAN LEUNG ALLAN 53 MR CHUA LEE KHENG FRANCIS 88 MR KANG CHUN YONG DAVE 19 MS BALBIR KAUR D/O SAWARAN SINGH 54 MS CHUA LIAN KIOK JANE 89 MS KHO CHIEW PENG 20 MS BALJIT KAUR 55 MS CLARA YAP BEE HOON 90 MS KHONG PHUI SHEONG EILEEN 21 MR BOBY S KAPPEN 56 MS DOLLY CHEW 91 MR KHOO JAMES 22 MR CHAN CHUN WAI WILLIAM 57 MR DON JACOB HUBER 92 MR KHOO SHEE FEI 23 MS CHAN LAY ENG PAMELA 58 MR EDGAR TROXLER 93 MS KOH CHAI YIM 24 MS CHAN MAY PENG 59 MS EMILY D/O MANUEL RAYAN 94 MR KOH POH SAN 25 MS CHAN MUI CHIN ANGELA 60 MS ESTHER WEE SZU 95 MS KOH SOK SANG JULIE 26 MR CHAN PON MUN CHARLIE 61 MR FANG TAU KIN RICKY 96 MS KOMATHI D/O THIRUPPATHIVASON 27 MR CHANG JOON KAI 62 MS FARAH BTE SAUD MARIE 97 MS KONG HWEE FUN MAY 28 MR CHEE CHAY WAH IVAN 63 MS FIONA THOMAS 98 MR KRISHNAMOORTHY KARTHIKEYAN 29 MS CHEE SUH YIEN CASSANDRA 64 MR FONG WENG SUN PETER VINCENT 99 MR KRISH PHUA TIONG ENG 30 MS CHEN DUN LIN CHRISTINA 65 MS GEETHA GOVINDAN 100 MS KULWINDER KAUR 31 MS CHENG BING LIN AGNES 66 MR GOH CHONG BOON 101 MR KWOK PUI SUM ROYAL 32 MS CHENG HWEE KIANG SERENE 67 MR GOH KIAP KIAH KELVIN 102 MS LAU BO CHU JANET 33 MS CHEONG KIM PHONG IRENE 68 MS GOH KUI HWA 103 MR LAU CHEE PHONG JOSEPH 34 MS CHEOW KWAN FOON RACHEL 69 MS GOH LUCY 104 MS LAU YAN YONG CHRISTINA 35 MS CHEW MAY PENG 70 MS GOH SIEW GEOK 105 MS LECK BEE SUAN ESTHER CA SA 0 1 9/ 11 AR 0
    • List of Volunteers as at 31st March 2010 106 MS LEE AI LIN 141 MS LIN KAI LI KELLY 176 MR ONG ENG CHUAN 107 MR LEE BOON GUAN 142 MR LING HUAT MIN AKIRA 177 MR ONG KOK CHUAN ANDREW 108 MS LEE CHEW YEN 143 MR LOH CHEE WAH DAVID 178 MS ONG LEE WEE NICOLE 109 MR LEE CHIN HOCK STEVEN 144 MS LOK SIEW LIAN 179 MS ONG LING LING IVY 110 MS LEE CHIN NOI LINDA 145 MS LOW CHUI HONG PATRICIA 180 MS ONG YEN LI JULIA 111 MS LEE CHIN YONG JENNY 146 MS LOW LEE KIANG JASMINE 181 MS ONG-LIM HUA ENG 112 MS LEE HUI LAN WINNIE 147 MS LUI CHENG HONG GLORIA 182 MR PATTABIRAN NAGARAJAN 113 MR LEE KEEN MUN CLIFF 148 MR MAHADEVAN LUKSHUMAYEH 183 MS PANDYA RADHIKA DEEPAK 114 MS LEE KIM POH ESTHER 149 MR MAK YEW SENG JUSTIN 184 MS PEARLINE TAN GWEE GUAT 115 MS LEE LI NGOH PAMELA 150 MS MARSHAL GAYATHRI REBECCA 185 MS PEGGY LEONG 116 MS LEE LI SONG SHARON 151 MS MARY ANNE LYNDA 186 MR PHUA WEI SEN DAMIEN 117 MS LEE LIANG CHIAN 152 MS MARY PREMA SAMUEL 187 MS POH HWEE HIAN 118 MR LEE PING HANG JONATHAN 153 MR MATHAVAN NAIR S/O MUKUNAN NAIR 188 MS PRITAM KAUR D/O MUKTIAR SINGH 119 MR LEE SHENG KEEN AKEEN 154 MS MAY HUI 189 MR QUAY LAY PENG JENNIFER 120 MS LEE YEN LAN 155 MS MOH FONG YOKE 190 MS RADHA CHOWDHURI 121 MR LEO JOSEPH 156 MR MOHAMAD FARID BIN MOHD NOR 191 MR RAHUL RAVINDRA JAIN 122 MS LEONG LI MEI ANGELINE 157 MR MOHAMMAD FAUZY BIN YAHYA 192 MR RAMASAMY SUBRAMANIAM 123 MS LI WEN APRIL 158 MR MOHAMMAD TARIQ S/O SAMSUDEEN 193 MR RAMESH CHIDAMBAR DIXIT 124 MS LIM BEE LENG MAY 159 MS MOLLY ANG SIAK LUANG 194 MS RANI D/O RAM H KHOOBCHANDANI 125 MR LIM CHIN CHYE JUSTIN 160 MS MURUGAPPA CHETTIAR SUNDARAVALLI 195 MS REBECCA LOH WANGYI 126 MS LIM FANG QI BERMADETTE 161 MR MUTHU VENDASALAM 127 MR LIM HAN BOON 162 MS NEW LEE CHING 128 MS LIM HENG LING LINDA 163 MS NG BEE CHIN GINA 129 MR LIM HOCK BENG 164 MS NG CHAI HOON EVON 130 MS LIM JULIE 165 MS NG GEOK HONG 131 MS LIM JUNE LEE 166 MR NG KOON CHUAN FRANCIS 132 MR LIM KAH KENG 167 MS NG PECK HOON EILEEN 133 MS LIM KUEE HUEY 168 MS NG SEOW KIN 134 MS LIM LAY KEOW ALLY 169 MR NICHOLAS LEE JIN KIAN 135 MS LIM LEE CHENG 170 MR NILGIRI SAI RAM 136 MS LIM LEE LANG DOREEN 171 MS NIO KWEE KIOW WINNIE 137 MS LIM PENG 172 MS NORAINI BTE MOHD 138 MS LIM SIEW CHENG 173 MS NORLELA MOHAMED 139 MS LIM SIONG SUSAN 174 MR NORMAN FIESTA TORRES AR 0 140 MS LIN QINGFEI 175 MS NORSHIFA BINTE HANIF 9/ 1 0 SA 12 CA
    • List of Volunteers as at 31st March 2010 196 MS RITA WONG 216 MS SOBANA K DAMOO 236 MR TEO PECK SIM CLEMENT 197 MS ROHANI BINTE ARIFFIN 217 MS SOH POH HIONG ALICIA 237 MR TIAN NYONG JAN THOMAS 198 MR RONNIE MA SOON PENG 218 MR SOH YAN LEE ANDY 238 MS TOH BOON GEOK LYNNE 199 MS ROSALYN CRISTYNA LEE 219 MS SOH YAN TIN LARAINE 239 MR TUNG KIN SUN ALVIN 200 MR SAM CHU 220 MR SOON MIN HIAN MATTHEW 240 MS VASUDEVAN YAMINI 201 MS SAMINAH BTE KEEDAL 221 MS STEPHANIE SURITA 241 MR VINCENT FELIX SOOSAI RAJ 202 MS SATHU ANANDAVALLI 222 MS STONEY THAM 242 MR VINOD BALAGOPAL 203 MS SEAH CHEW PENG 223 MS SUJATHA PALPANABAN 243 MS WANG MEI KUI SHANE 204 MS SEAH KAI NOI KAREN 224 MS TAN BEE HOON IRENE 244 MR WONG GEI CHEONG STANLEY 205 MS SEET CHOR HOON 225 MR TAN HYE TECK RICHARD 245 MS WONG SU REN 206 MR SEET POH 226 MR TAN KENG SENG DEREK 246 MR WONG TOON SUAN PHILIP 207 MS SEOW SOO HUAN MARGARET 227 MS TAN LAY CHOO CATHY 247 MS WUN SHIRIN 208 MS SERENE TAY LAY CHOO 228 MS TAN SOCK KENG SAMANTHA 248 MR XIE YAO YU 209 MR SHEPHERDSON PERCIVAL JOSEPH 229 MS TAN SWEE GEK VERA 249 MS XAVIER ANTHONIAMMAL 210 MR SIEW KAI KONG RICHARD 230 MR TAN SZE TZE WILLIAM 250 MS YANG LIEW FANG 211 MS SIEW SHUET KENG JOAN 231 MR TAN WAI HONG ALVIN 251 MS YEE POH LAI PAULIN 212 MS SIM CHUAI SHUN EMILY 232 MS TAN WOON TSI ZOE 252 MR YEO CHENG HOCK ALVIN 213 MS SIOK PIT CHING CAROL 233 MR TAY CHUAN SENG 253 MR YONG SHOU PIN 214 MS SISTER SIENA PILLAI 234 MR TEE KAI PENG 254 MR YONG YONG GORDON 215 MS SITI ALAWIYAH BINTE OMAR 235 MS TEO CHYE LAN JOSEPHINE 233 22 1 254 Total No. of Volunteers Total No. of Total No. of Resigned Total No. of Volunteers as at 01.04.2009 New Volunteers Volunteers as at 31.03.2010 CA SA 0 1 9/ 13 AR 0
    • The Fruit of Love: Our Activities Outreach and Awareness Programmes  Singapore Island Country Club’s May Day Donation  Charity Film Premiere: State of Play  Run into Prison  Experiencing a Black Out  Community Visits Our Reintegration Programme and Support Services  Case Management Framework Programme  Ex-offenders Assistance Scheme  Education Support Programme  Volunteer After-Care Programme Planting more Seeds: New Developments “Love is a fruit in season at all times, and within reach of every hand. “ Mother Teresa
    • Outreach and Awareness 1 May 2009 Singapore Island Country Club - May Day Donation The Singapore Island Country Club’s May Day Charity Open grew from humble beginnings in 1972 and has become a popular, long standing tradition of the Club. This annual charity drive brings together members, corporations, businesspeople, staff and supporters to contribute to the lives of the less fortunate. Since its inception, the event has raised $14 million for over 70 charities, earning the Club its most prized accolade, “The Club with a Heart”. What started out as a charity golf game has now grown into a Club-wide effort by the various sporting and lifestyle communities to raise funds for the needy and underprivileged in a concerted, yet diverse effort. The happiness and appreciation shown by the beneficiaries with these donations cannot be described in words. This has been made possible by the tireless efforts of staff and volunteers and importantly, the abundance of very generous donations. In 2009, SICC raised an admirable amount whereby 14 charities were chosen as beneficiaries. SACA is pleased to be one of the recipients. 3 June 2009 Charity Film Premiere - State of Play 620 movie-goers enjoyed an evening at the cinema despite the double trouble of the economic gloom and flu outbreak. State of Play, a political thriller starring Russell Crowe and Ben Affleck certainly “put journalism and politics in a different perspective,” as our guest-of-honour Mr. Lim Boon Heng (Minister, Prime Minister’s office) remarked in the lift on his way out of Cathay Cineleisure after enjoying the movie. Mr. Jeffrey Beh, Chairman of SACA, highlighted in his speech that “due to troubled times the economy is currently facing, voluntary welfare organizations are painfully feeling its effects. There is nothing to do other than to accept the challenge placed before us and strive to do our best to meet the ever growing needs of those who require some assistance to get by.” Our supporters went against the downward pull of the economy and helped us raise a record $111,400. A teapot handcrafted by a student in a pottery workshop held at Kaki We lovingly named it, our Pot of Hope. Bukit Prison School was presented to our guest-of-honour. CA SA 0 1 9/ 15 AR 0
    • Outreach and Awareness 6 September 2009 Running into Prison This inaugural fun run organised by the Yellow Ribbon Project saw participants run past historical sites such as the Johor Battery, Changi Chapel Museum, Old Changi Prison Wall and into the prison ground itself! Curious participants were intrigued to see the mock-up prison cell that was set up. Hanniel Choong, an ex-offender who took part and outpaced many in the race, demonstrated his determination to outrun his drug abusing past. This was an inspiration to many inmates. On site, there were amusements to enjoy such as street magicians, free ice-cream and stage performances by ex-offenders. The public gained a new perspective “in prison”. We also participated with an information booth with the objective of building awareness and recruiting new volunteers. 29 October 2009 Experiencing a Black Out “When there is a black out, bring out the light.” This is the motto of a group of do-gooders, mainly business professionals who are the best of friends. The organisers teamed up with us for the one- night BLACKOUT event at Mt Emily; funds raised were channeled to the Education Fund to support ex-offenders' reintegration into society through education. The organizers of Blackout@Emily felt that incarceration is akin to experiencing a ‘blackout’. Can a life that has gone through a blackout re-adjust and reintegrate into society? Can a person who is here but really away for years get back on the right track? Can a person regain his confidence and self-esteem and walk out of his own darkness? Where is the real blackout? BLACKOUT celebrates the simple gesture of reaching out to light a candle in the dark - just when it is needed most. Tery Chua, a trainer with Right Impact Training, who is the leader of the organising committee hopes that through BLACKOUT they can support the assimilation of ex-offenders into society, and bring greater awareness to young professionals regarding SACA and the work it does. AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 16 CA
    • Outreach and Awareness Community Visits 14 August 2009 MHA Visits SACA Mr Masagos Zulkifli, Senior Parliamentary Secretary of the Ministry of Home Affairs visited SACA in August 09. The objective of the visit was to find out more about the service gaps in the community faced by ex-offenders. After spending an afternoon understanding our services, Mr Masagos expressed interest in meeting up with the students who had benefited from the Education Support Program (ESP), a service that provides funding, support networks and workshops to motivate student-clients who are enthusiastic about upgrading their skills and continuing their learning. Seven students who are currently pursuing diplomas in various polytechnics met the Senior Parliamentary Secretary in September. It was a fruitful session with informal dialogue and interactions between our esteemed guest and the students. The students felt comfortable to openly share their thoughts, and our guest enjoyed listening to their ideas. Both sides had such an enjoyable time, it was difficult to say goodbye! 29 March 2010 Prisons Counsellors and CNB drops in 16 in-care prison counsellors and representatives from the Central Narcotic Bureau paid a visit to get a better understanding of the services offered at aftercare organisations. The members, who work with drug & inhalant abusers as well as long-term offenders, found this visit helpful and of much relevance to their work in prison. “ I like doing what I do because I believe in second chances. Having the public support our cause is certainly encouraging to the work that we do. “ CA Christine, Communications & Partnerships 0 SA 1 9/ 17 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services “ Two months THEY came release, thebuild thing that I always felt was FEAR. That’s when before my forward to one up my courage and confidence. I took a step at a time with care. And whenever I was confused or lost, THEY helped me by guiding me out of the darkness. THEY don’t feel tired nor get bored with our questions. THEY didn’t give up on us. THEY try very hard to keep us on the right track. THEY make me feel at ease which gives me the strength to move on with my life. THEY are like angels in human form. THEY are my guardian angels. I'm still finding a way to thank these people. “ A client, successfully reintegrated since 2007, on caseworkers and volunteers. AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 18 CA
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services Case Management Framework Programme Since 2001 SACA has been providing For the year in review, 586 clients the need to review the programme’s Additional Services to Client the Case Management Framework opted for the programme, a twelve effectiveness. An extensive review Programme (CMFP) to inmates percent increase over the previous was conducted with the aim of Food Rations supplied by NTUC who have been incarcerated, be it year. Our ACMs provided regular improving service delivery. Accord- Welfare Drive, a new initiative by for less than a year or more than counselling and casework up to six ingly, emphasis was placed on the NTUC Eastpoint has designated SACA ten years. Usually, after a period months post-release. Forty-one professionals providing the services to be the beneficiary of surplus items of confinement, most inmates are percent successfully completed the - the supervision and counselling from the supermarket. Since January apprehensive about their release. programme achieving goals jointly processes in place. Presently, the 2010, we have been providing basic Upon release, many face difficulties crafted (by both the client and ACM) Aftercare agencies are enhancing commodities like sugar, rice, canned in readjusting to society. With little before clients’ release. several aspects of the programme food and even washing powder to ability to cope with issues like to better align services based on our needy clients and their family. finding a place to stay, getting a job, Collaboration client’s level of need and risk of Clients, particularly those just re-offending. released, have found this assistance negative peer pressure or no family ‘Project Connect’, a collaborative support, it is not unusual for some effort between Singapore Prison very helpful indeed. As a result of this review, the need to be just a poor decision away from Service (SPS), Singapore Corporation for a new funding model was going back to prison. of Rehabilitative Enterprises (SCORE) suggested. The Aftercare agencies and SACA, made CMFP available to along with the funders - SPS, SCORE CMFP is provided by full time 60 inmates. Project Connect aims and National Council of Social caseworkers who are either social to help inmates secure jobs before Service (NCSS) are working on a work or psychology trained. The their release by providing them with revised funding model targeting the programme provides clients access helpful skills like presentation and programme duration and level of to a range of practical services interview skills. Project participants engagement from clients and their including counselling, temporary who had secured jobs via SCORE’s family members. acco m modatio n, em ployment , career portal and met our admission education/training opportunities criteria were also automatically Our ACMs have attended regular and community-based activities. enrolled in CMFP to provide both trainings conducted by various employment and social support to external agencies. These, along with Programme Outputs boost clients’ efforts to get back on case conferences and team meetings their feet. As CMFP is a voluntary programme, have helped develop the expertise inmates have a choice to take it up or and capabilities of our caseworkers. not. Mass briefings are conducted by Looking Forward Arrangements have also been final- After-care Case Managers (ACM) to As CMFP is approaching its tenth ised to engage an external clinical help inmates understand the nature year, SPS, Singapore Anti-Narcotics supervisor to aid in the development and purpose of the programme. Association (SANA) and SACA felt of the ACMs. CA SA 0 1 9/ 19 AR 0
    • Case Management Framework Programme Statistics CMFP Cases by Age (Male) CMFP Cases by Education Level (Male) 350 500 307 439 300 Total Cases 1 Total Cases1 Cases disengaged 400 Cases disengaged 250 234 237 prematurely2 prematurely2 328 Cases who have Cases who have completed prog 300 completed prog No. of Cases No. of Cases 200 150 200 114 166 99 101 140 100 87 85 128 73 112 59 100 67 50 39 43 19 30 6 3 0 6 4 0 0 0 20 & below 21 to 29 30 to 39 40 to 49 50 & above No Formal Edu Pri Sec Post Sec Age Education Level 1 Intake and cases carried forward from FY 2007/2008 2 Cases that dropped out or partial completion of programme CMFP Cases by Marital Status (Male) 600 528 Total Cases1 500 Cases disengaged prematurely2 The positive re-integration of the CMFP client is 400 Cases who have demonstrated by him/her achieving at least 2 of No. of Cases completed prog the following 5 goals within the six-month post 300 release programme timeframe: 207 At least one goal must be from either domain: 200 162 175 1 Securing Employment / Job Training 131 or 100 68 2 56 50 52 Securing Accommodation 18 8 5 2 1 0 The other goals are from the following domains: 0 Single Married Separated Divorced Living Together 3 Securing Social Support (family & friends) Marital Status 4 Displaying relevant Coping Skills 5 AR 0 9/ 1 Displaying Positive Lifestyle trends 0 SA 20 CA
    • Case Management Framework Programme Statistics Assistance Rendered 2% 2% 1% Nature of Assistance Rendered Frequency 1% 0% Financial Assistance Financial Assistance 43 25% Employment Assistance Employment Assistance 27 Education Assistance Education Assistance 2 Information and Referral Information and Referral 579 Counselling (Individual / Family) Counselling (Individual / Family) 1580 69% Referral for Accommodation Referral for Accommodation 15 Others - befriending by volunteers, support groups, etc Others - befriending by volunteers, support groups, etc 47 Frequency Client Outcome and Milestones Client achieved 1 outcome 63 238 Client achieved 2 or more outcomes by the end of the CMF Programme. Of these, at least one of them was from the employment / job training / education or accommodation domain Client established contact with the ACM at least once within the first month after release 391 Client signed up for CMFP 586 Clients attended mass briefing on CMFP 910 CA Milestone No. of clients 0 SA 1 9/ 21 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services Ex-offenders Assistance Scheme Ex-offenders face a number of fallen through the cracks as they workers are mindful of the need to obstacles in their effort to become were not identified or did not qualify affirm client’s commitment to work functional members of society for aftercare programmes such or abide by the house rules before after their incarceration. Tangible as CMFP or the VAP. Sometimes, recommending them to relevant challenges include finding accommo- clients who had initially turned down organisations. dation and earning an income to help from the schemes mentioned meet basic needs. Intangible obsta- earlier would have a change of heart Two major supporters for this cles include the stigma they face after encountering unanticipated programme are SCORE’s Employment from the community and even their challenges upon release and drop-by Assistance Unit and the Yellow families upon return to the outside at the Association for assistance. Ribbon Emergency Fund. The former world. remains SACA’s main source of secur- The most common form of assistance ing employment for clients whilst the The Ex-offenders Assistance Scheme sought by walk-in or call-in clients latter is an additional resource that (EAS) essentially targets people who under the EAS pertains to employ- gives interim aid for meals and trans- may not have been identified as ment, finance and accommodation. port for needy discharged offenders, requiring help prior to their release All clients are assigned a caseworker enabling them to make ends meet from prison. The scheme thus acts who will assess client’s receptivity until they collect their first salary. as a safety net to cushion the fall for to and suitability for specific work those who may have inadvertently or temporary stay at a shelter. Case- Clients According to Sub-Programmes Walk-in Referral TOTAL Cases brought forward 13 2 15 New Cases 27 10 37 Total Cases 40 12 52 AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 22 CA
    • Ex-offenders Assistance Scheme Statistics New Cases by Gender and Race MALE FEMALE GRAND RACE Chinese Malay Indian Others TOTAL Chinese Malay Indian Others TOTAL TOTAL Walk-In 5 12 4 3 24 1 1 1 3 27 Referral 2 5 3 10 10 Total 7 17 7 3 34 1 1 1 3 37 Cases by Gender and Age Group MALE FEMALE GRAND AGE TOTAL 20 & 21 30 40 50 & 20 & 21 30 40 50 & below to 29 to 39 to 49 above TOTAL below to 29 to 39 to 49 above TOTAL Walk-In 2 7 10 5 24 1 1 1 3 27 Referral 1 4 2 3 10 10 Total 3 11 12 8 34 1 1 1 3 37 Cases by Gender and Marital Status MALE FEMALE GRAND MARITAL STATUS Single Married Separated Divorced Living Single Married Separated Divorced Living TOTAL Together TOTAL Together TOTAL Walk-In 16 4 4 24 1 1 1 3 27 Referral 8 1 1 10 10 Total 24 5 5 34 1 1 1 3 37 Cases by Gender and Education Level MALE FEMALE EDUCATION GRAND LEVEL NFE* Primary Secondary Diploma TOTAL NFE* Primary Secondary Diploma TOTAL TOTAL or Higher or Higher Walk-In 10 11 3 24 1 2 3 27 Referral 9 1 10 10 Total 10 20 4 34 1 2 3 37 CA SA 0 * No Formal Education 1 9/ 23 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services Education Support Programme Arguably, no one is born a criminal. opportunity for ex-offenders to ex-offenders who aspire to advance and are ill equipped to deal with Some people commit crimes due upgrade themselves is something their educational goals but lack the the challenges of everyday life. to the stress and pressure to make that is critical in order to enable them necessary support and resources to Students in this programme receive ends meet for themselves, or for to fit into fast-changing world. do so. Often, these ex-offenders are counselling, tutoring and mentoring their family. Research and statistics unaware of the additional learning on top of the very tangible financial have shown that many ex-offenders The Education Support Programme opportunities available. They also assistance needed to further their do not even have post primary (ESP) was primarily set up to lack family support, positive role education. education. In such a situation, the serve as a support system for models, the required finances, Voices of Student-Client Beneficiaries “ I am very grateful to the Lee Foundation who has given me the opportunity to further my studies. Without this funding, I wouldn’t pursue this educational upgrade as my family cannot afford the school fees. Other than being appreciative of the financial support, I am also thankful to SACA who has provided me with a counsellor, who advised me on problems faced. Meaningful and rewarding events were also regularly organised to enhance us physically and mentally. ” Graduate from Nanyang Polytechnic In addition, workshops and activities were conducted throughout the year “ I am able to further my studies after being released from prison, all thanks to the to sustain the students’ motivation Lee Foundation and SACA. Now I know that there is help for us ex-offenders levels, promote pro-social attitudes and society has not forsaken us. I strive to become a better person. ” and behaviour, and encourage emotional and social growth. ESP’s Graduate from Nanyang Polytechnic key role is to provide overall holistic support to the student-clients who have taken to upgrading themselves “ Because of SACA’s ESP, I completed an internship during my school holidays. The internship has given me an insight to the working world now, as the last so as to provide them a smoother time I worked in a company was 10 years ago, before I got incarcerated. transition from the prison cell back to the classroom; some after a hiatus My colleagues accepted me for who I am now, and not what of ten years or more. I have done before. This really serves as an encouragement to me. ” Current student in Ngee Ann Polytechnic AR 0 9/ 1 Completed a 6-week internship with Pacific Agriscience, a SME 0 SA 24 CA
    • Education Support Programme Programme Activities 13 March 2009 Gaining Self and Esteem Our first workshop focused on building confidence and self-esteem. This was an important topic to kick off the New Year, as we believe with confidence and high self-esteem one is less likely to give in to peer pressure and negative influences. It was also an opportunity to introduce the freshmen to their seniors in the support group, resulting in positive relationships. Guest speaker, Mr Jonathan Lee worked with the students on how having self-esteem works to their advantage in their everyday lives. 30 April 2009 Meditation for Improved Concentration As part of its Vocational Service Committee project, the Rotary Club of Singapore collaborated with Sensei International to organise a half-day workshop for the student-clients. Mr Gerald Abeyawardena, a senior trainer with Sensei International, emphasized the importance of life purpose, and demonstrated how a positive attitude plus passion can help students achieve their goals. The workshop equipped students with the tools and meditation techniques for self-improvement, self-empowerment and self-discovery. “ The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet. ” Aristotle 0 SA CA 1 9/ 25 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services 14 July 2009 Healing through Music Music has always been known as a universal language capable of reaching out and overcoming barriers. This workshop was designed to provide students from different institutions a platform for interaction and build relationships, thus reinforcing positive peer role models. Two talented volunteers from the Performing Arts Centre Singapore kindly offered their time to share with the students their extensive knowledge about music, and also how music has played a significant part in their lives. The hands-on workshop saw students learning to play instruments within two hours and it ended with a “grand finale” where all participants joined together to play together in harmony. 9 October 2009 Keeping Fit When faced with pressure from studies, we encourage students to exercise. This not only keeps them healthy, but it is also a positive way to reduce stress. A fitness trainer, Ms Estelle Goh, was invited to conduct an introductory session on a body workout that combines defence combat, tai chi & yoga. AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 26 CA
    • Education Support Programme 26 December 2009 Year End BBQ It was time for the students to have fun and relax! It was also the first time we used SACA’s open rooftop for such a purpose. It was relaxing and informal - no presentations, no taking notes. We discovered many aspiring chefs that day! 26 March 2010 The Power of the Sub-Conscious Mind Following the success of last year’s workshop, we invited Sensei International again to start the year with tools and techniques for students to harness the power of the sub-conscious mind to accomplish their goals. The students also learned about conflict resolution as well as self-motivation. At the end of the workshop, the students created their own Personal Success Collage. This, hopefully, will help them stay focused for the challenges that lay ahead. CA SA 0 1 9/ 27 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services Financial Schemes Lee Foundation Education Assistance Scheme (LFEAS) COMPLIMENTARY INITIATIVES The Lee Foundation has a seven year history on this basis, rather than confirm funding The first quarter of 2010 saw the Internship scheme with of collaborating with SACA to assist students for the entire duration of study from the extension of an ongoing initiative Pacific Agriscience who dream of upgrading themselves after beginning, is to ensure the student-clients and the implementation of some- Pacific Agriscience (PA), a Small and their release, yet do not have the financial constantly strive to make the most of the thing new. Following a three-day Medium Enterprise specialising in means to do so. opportunity afforded them and not take this programme retreat, the team came agro-technology has collaborated help for granted. up with an even more comprehen- with SACA to offer internships to For the past year, LFEAS has provided an sive support structure for students. tertiary ESP student-clients during assistance totalling $74,874.05 benefiting The students are awarded incentives on a The main intent is to provide a their term break. This has been 45 student-clients, including 30 recurrent semester basis when they do well for their smoother transition for student- initiated to provide the students with applicants. Recurrent applicants refer to ITE, examinations, show marked improvement inmates from the prison school to some real life working experience, Diploma and Degree students who apply on in their grades, and when they participate the after-care learning environment and to further reinforce PA’s corpo- a semester basis during the course of their actively in workshops and service related by providing better preparation for rate culture of believing in second studies. The intention of providing funding initiatives organised as part of the ESP. their eventual return to mainstream chances. schools. To this end several other measures will be in place only from During their internship, students To qualify, applicants must be: What is provided: the new FY onwards and will not be would be able to learn about pesti- Released not more than 2 Up to 90% subsidy of reported on here. cides, the Agro-Chemical Industry, years prior to application course and exam fees logistics, customer service, accounts, Free Tuition product sourcing and market research. Singapore Citizen or Book grants This internship programme is offered to Permanent Resident Students who are weak in certain students pursuing business or chemis- subjects yet unable to pay for tuition try related courses. Applying for GCE Level, are provided with volunteer tutors or Polytechnic Diploma here at SACA. These volunteers are The pioneer intern, a student courses either members of the public or pursuing a Diploma in Accountancy, existing volunteers of SACA’s VAP. underwent his attachment from 1 Existing senior student-clients of the March till 12 April 2010. The stint has Management of the In-care Education Grant 2010 ESP excelling in certain subjects are proved to be successful for the The In-care Education Grant provides finan- involved in the interviewing process to especially tapped on as well, this is student as well as PA, with both cial assistance to students under the Prison assess the eligibility of 158 offenders (and to reinforce the notion of giving- parties believing that this has been a Education Branch who are pursuing their their families) who applied for it. Student- back in return for what they have win-win relationship auguring well landmark examinations while serving their offenders who are released prior to their received. for continued collaboration. sentences. Typically, these students are GCE examinations will be assigned a case- unable to afford the exam fees for the GCE worker who will help them sustain their exams and their families are unable to focus towards completing their course of assist either. SACA caseworkers were education after release. AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 28 CA
    • Education Support Programme Statistics Breakdown of the number of cases under the ESP in FY 2009/2010: Breakdown of amount disbursed underLFEAS from Apr 2009 to Mar 2010: Types of Cases New Cases Existing Cases* TOTAL Type of Disbursement Amount Disbursed ESP Direct Cases1 9 42 51 Course Fees $61,496.75 ESP Other Programme Cases2 15 6 21 Exam Fees $ 1,245.00 Total Cases 24 48 72 Book Grants $ 7,360.00 ** Refers to cases brought forward from Mar 2009 to the new financial year. Incentive (Course Fees) $ 4,297.30 1 Refers to cases that are walk-ins, call-ins or referrals from external agencies for educational assistance during FY 2009/2010. External agencies include Prisons, PASS, etc. Incentive (Book Grants) $ 475.00 2 Refers to cases that are currently existing cases under other programmes o ered by SACA. These cases are provided education assistance. TOTAL $74,874.05 Breakdown of all students who received LFEAS funding from Apr 2009 to Mar 2010: No. Of Applicants who applied for the In-care Edu Grant: Types of Cases No. Of Students Course No. Of Applications of Study Received / (No. Approved*) General Education at Institute of Technical Education (ITE) 1 (1 new case) GCE ‘N’ Level 81 (78 approved) GCE ‘O’ Level at Institute of Technical Education (ITE) / 3 (1 new case) Approved Private Institutions GCE ‘O’ Level 61 (56 approved) Certificate Courses 1 (1 new case) GCE ‘A’ Level 16 (14 approved) Institute of Technical Education (ITE) Courses 1 (0 new case) TOTAL 158 (148 approved) * Includes both full funding and co-payment cases Polytechnic Diploma Courses / 32 (11 new cases) Approved Private Diploma Courses Degree Courses 7 (1 new case) TOTAL 45 (15 new cases) CA SA 0 1 9/ 29 AR 0
    • Education Support Programme Statistics No. of In-Care Edu Grant Applicants in terms of the status of their application: No. of In-Care Edu Grant Applicants in terms of Institution: Not Approved 120 10 106 Approved – Partial funding 100 19 80 Approved - Full funding 60 31 40 20 21 0 Changi Changi Kaki Bukit 129 Prison Women’s Centre Complex Prison (Prison School) Grants No. of Students who received tuition services: Education Level No. of Students Assisted GCE ‘N’ Level 3 GCE ‘O’ Level 7 Diploma 1 Degree 1 TOTAL 12 AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 30 CA
    • Voices of SACA “ It is encouraging to see clients and their families display courage and perseverance when facing the difficulties and stigmatisation encountered during the reintegration journey. ” “ What touched me most in my work is humility. My clients transformed themselves from their previously 'high' lives to their current humble selves. It serves as a reminder to me to keep myself grounded. ” “ Not all of my clients have successfully reintegrated. Yet “ Every client is different and hence the way we work with there are some very eager to prove to society that they them differs. Most of them appreciate the time that we've deserve a second chance. Those are the ones who have put in just to ensure that they are okay, touched me with their sincerity and keep me going. ” even if it was just a phone call. ” “ I believe that everyone deserves a second chance, no “ To witness the efforts of clients who keep moving ahead matter what their history is; and although we cannot change despite obstacles proves that the human spirit their past, we can help change their future. ” can triumph over all odds. ” “ I've always believed that it is better to give than to “ Providing services to ex-offenders is sometimes receive. Hearing about clients who are coping well and frustrating but also challenging. This is probably a career not striving to achieve their goals undoubtedly many would consider but it is one-of-a-kind. ” brings a smile to my face. ” CA SA 0 1 9/ 31 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services Volunteer After-Care Programme The Volunteer After-Care Programme (VAP) has come a long way since its inception in 1997. From the pioneer batch of volunteers in those early days, the modest group of 14 has grown to an impressive pool of 254 today! The success of the VAP would not have been possible without the hard work, dedication and contribution from the volunteers, who are not only generous with their time but also share the same passion in supporting ex-offenders trying to rebuild their lives. As we continued to expand the volunteer pool through our recruitment initiatives, we have also done our best to ensure that existing volunteers remain connected, motivated and current through organising various activities such as get-togethers, workshops and continual training programmes. Year in Review – Summary of Activities May 2009 October 2009 o Volunteer Ms Wong Su Ren conducted “Exploring your Life Purpose” o Pre-service training conducted for new volunteers workshop for clients o Appreciation Night for volunteers o Volunteers and clients attended a theatre production by The Voice, o Volunteers were trained under the new initiative, Prison Volunteer Training “Common Sense” December 2009 June 2009 o Mr Masagos Zulkifli, SPS MHA, visits SACA re new initiative involving the VAP o A group of specially selected senior volunteers, provided basic training for new facilitators from various agencies for the Community Re-integration Programme (CRP) conducted January 2010 across prison institutions o Volunteer trainers conducted another round of CRP training o Volunteers attended a Stress Management workshop o Pot-luck party for bonding August 2009 February 2010 o Volunteers attended a Gambling Addiction workshop o New befriending programme underway with prisons o Appreciation dinner for Volunteer Leaders Committee completing their stint September 2009 o Recruitment drive for new volunteers including conducting March 2010 individual interviews for all to ensure the right matching of o Inaugural conference for SACA volunteers facilitating CRP volunteers with the cause “ The best way to find yourself, is to lose yourself in the service of others. “ Gandhi AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 32 CA
    • Volunteer After-Care Programme Highlights 30 October 2009 Volunteer Appreciation Nite – Tropical Paradise The Riverview Hotel was transformed, with of Home Affairs, they both presented five Ms May Hui and Mr John Ho were also exotic ferns and flowers, into a tropical and ten-year service awards to deserving commended for going the extra mile in paradise just for our volunteers. Adorning volunteers. their volunteering work. them with garlands as they entered the ballroom and placing a tall cool glass of Ex-clients serenaded the guests and Everyone looks forward to a lucky draw fruit-punch in their hands, it almost felt as if volunteer Mr Tee Kai Peng shared about and it was no different that night as they were in Hawaii! the strong bond he had built up with his attractive prizes awaited some lucky client who was also present to give his people. The top prize, a WMF Palma Our Guest of Honour and patron, Associate side of the story. It was both touching seventy-piece cutlery set worth $999 Professor Ho Peng Kee, Senior Minister of and funny when they depicted their “first plus a $100 Robinson shopping voucher State for Law & Home Affairs, was a good date”. For their exemplary efforts over went to an elated Ms Esther Ang. Prizes sport resplendent in a striking red floral the past year, Ms Radha Chowdhuri and were generously sponsored by Kenko shirt. Together with our special guest Mr Kai Peng received the “Outstanding New Holdings Pte Ltd, WMF Singapore Pte Ltd, Masagos Zulkifli, Senior Parliamentary Volunteer” and “Outstanding Volunteer” Asean Chess Academy, Robinsons & Co. Secretary, Ministry of Education & Ministry awards respectively. Ms Clara Yap, (Singapore) Pte Ltd, and Café Le Caire. 23 January 2010 Pot Luck Party–B-I-N-G-O! Volunteers took the helm in planning a party to kick-start the new year. A cosy group came together, brought food, shared recipes and played games. Volunteer Sai Ram was the host for Bingo and he was indeed quite the professional! The winners played their way to dining vouchers from Eighteen Chefs sponsored by the organizing committee members. CA SA 0 1 9/ 33 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services 26 February 2010 Thanking the Volunteer Leaders In appreciation of their contribution as part of the Leaders Committee for the last 2 years, SACA hosted a dinner at Café Le Caire. The attendees were spoilt for choice with the extensive menu. SACA’s Director Mr Prem Kumar took the opportunity to thank the leaders for their contribution and shared the Association’s future plans with them. 13 March 2010 Inaugural Coping Skills Conference The Community Reintegration Programme (CRP) is intended to assist soon-to-be-released inmates in their transition back to society. The content has been specifically designed for volunteers to be able to facilitate the delivery of the package to the target group. In 2008, SACA was appointed to coordinate the training of all facilitators involved in the programme. SACA organized the 1st Coping Skills Conference for our volunteers involved in the facilitation of this programme. The objective of the conference was to allow participants to identify concerns and discuss solutions to improve the quality of the programme and enhance their facilitation skills. This was also an excellent opportunity for fellow facilitators to AR 0 9/ learn by sharing their own best practices. 1 0 SA 34 CA
    • Volunteer After-Care Programme Statistics Profile of Volunteers Status of Volunteers Breakdown of Volunteers by Educational Background and Gender Male Female TOTAL EDUCATION LEVEL Male Female TOTAL No. of volunteer as of 31 March 2010 86 147 233 Degree 51 65 116 No. recruited during the FY 2009/2010 10 12 22 Diploma 31 41 72 A-Level 2 7 9 No. resigned during the FY 2009/2010 1 1 O-Level 1 8 9 No. of volunteer as of 31 March 2009 96 160 254 Secondary & Below 8 29 35 Others 3 10 13 Breakdown of Volunteers by Race, Gender and Age Group TOTAL 96 160 254 AGE Chinese Malay Indian Others TOTAL GROUP M F M F M F Breakdown of Volunteers by Profession M F M F 21 - 30 11 21 1 5 1 5 1 13 32 PROFESSION TOTAL 31 - 40 22 41 1 3 10 5 1 34 49 Professional, Technical & Related Workers 67 41 - 50 13 37 2 3 8 3 19 47 Administrative, Managerial & Executive Workers 85 51 - 60 17 17 1 5 7 2 1 25 25 Clerical & Related Workers 18 Above 60 2 4 1 2 1 5 5 Sales Workers 10 TOTAL 65 120 4 10 21 25 6 3 96 158 Service Workers 9 Self-Employed 17 Cases Managed by Volunteer After-Care Officers SAF & Other Govt. Uniform Services Personals 7 Overall Case Load by Sub-Programmes Unemployed / Retirees / Home-makers 41 SUB PROGRAMMES TOTAL TOTAL 254 One -To-One Befriending 1 73 Community Re-Integration Programme (CRP) 2 1156 TOTAL NUMBER 1229 1 Befriending clients are from Kaki Bukit Centre and Changi Women's Prison. CA 2 SA CRP clients are from Changi Prison Complex/A5/B1/B4. 0 1 9/ 35 AR 0
    • Voices of SACA What challenges do you face in this volunteering work? I need to earn their trust; I need them to accept me as a befriender because naturally one is guarded as to why a stranger would want to extend help. Why have you chosen to volunteer with SACA Are there any memorable experiences that and to work with inmates /ex-offenders? you can share? In 2001, I was very excited when Kaki Bukit Prison It was during Chinese New Year’s Eve when I School accepted my proposal to run a chess pro- conducted a group session in Prisons. At the end gramme within Prisons. That was the first time I of it, an inmate stood up and asked the class if worked with inmates. I enjoyed interacting with they realized it was the eve of the busiest holiday them and found them to be very positive toward for Chinese people. Yet here I was with them. learning. Driven by that experience, I wanted to He then asked his group mates to thank me for do more to help, thus I enrolled with SACA. being there with them. I was very surprised and Has this volunteering journey enhanced your touched as I didn’t expect this burly man with life in any way? tattoos all over his arms and legs to appreciate I have learnt to be patient, and more tactful with what I did. my words with people. I am less judgmental, as Another instance was during Volunteer’s Appre- I go “behind-the-scenes” and understand why ciation Day. With permission, an inmate went up people commit crimes. Working with youths to stage and shouted into the microphone, “Who behind bars, I have also learnt how to communi- are we? We are just prisoners! Yet you came and cate better with teenagers. gave your time. You’ve showed us that people How do you suggest potential volunteers still care.” My tears just flowed... get started? In this work that we do, there is no “one size fits What satisfaction do you derive from your volunteering, and how does your family all” strategy. We need to be patient with clients feel about what you do? on our journey with them. Observe your mentors During the first 15 minutes, it is not easy to and do not be afraid to ask for help. Provide a get the client to respond. They size you up as good listening ear to your client and focus. Help you walk into the classroom and sit with their them set realistic goals and do not give them arms folded. However, if one pushes on, they false hope. Most of them need help in regaining eventually start to respond and participate in their self-esteem. the activities and questions and I experience a As volunteers, we represent the society that joy that is indescribable. I am very fortunate to ex-offenders will be returning to. By volunteer- have an understanding and supportive family ing, we demonstrate society’s willingness to AR 0 9/ 1 who encourage me in this work. accept them, to help them in their reintegration. 0 SA 36 CA
    • Planting more Seeds: New Developments “ Let us learn to appreciate there will be times when the trees will be bare, and look forward to the time when we may pick the fruit. “ Anton Chekhov Training & Research Initiative Training is not something new to SACA. The Association has been As much as volunteers have given their time and effort freely conducting in-house training for its volunteers for the better part for the benefit of the clients, we are also inspired to give as the of the thirteen years that the VAP has been in existence. In 2008 volunteers have, by sharing with them what we have learnt in this was taken a step further when SACA was tasked to prepare all the aftercare sector over the past decades. What’s more, facilitators conducting the CRP package run across prison through training, we also ensure our continual learning; indeed institutions. ‘to teach is to learn twice’. It was at this point that management, seeing as how there was a The provision of structured training and development general lack of training packages available catering specifically to programmes is not only intended to continually renew and the after-care sector, started to seriously consider the possibility of upgrade volunteers’ skills, but also certifies their helping to do its part to start filling this gap. accomplishments and formalises the upgrading of their qualifications. I. TRAINING FOR VOLUNTEERS The Training Package PRISON-VOLUNTEER TRAINING PROGRAMME Volunteers’ expertise needs to be matched with areas of need, In early 2009 SACA met up with the then Programme Branch of including emerging needs, which arise from changing demands Prison to discuss the issue of training for staff and volunteers and expectations on the part of prisons, the volunteers, the involved in in-care and after-care work. As it turned out Prison inmates seeking assistance, as well as society as a whole. informed us that they too were looking at strengthening their systems and structures with regards to prison volunteers The Prison Volunteer Training (Basic) includes: numbering well over a thousand. (1) Prison Orientation and Security & Safety Awareness Following six months of discussion and planning SACA was (2) Volunteer Ethics in the Prison setting appointed to draw up a training curriculum and conduct training for (3) Dealing with Inmates all prison volunteers in September 2009. Concurrently Prison was busy reviewing and revamping its recruitment and management of It is mandatory for all volunteers to undergo this basic training its volunteers. This occupied both parties over the following module in order to volunteer within prison institutions, while quarter and the training was formally launched in January 2010 attendance of the intermediate and advance modules is with the pioneer batch of some 40 existing volunteers undergoing voluntary and based on the recommendation of the respective the compulsory Basic Training Module that month. agencies the volunteers belong to. SA CA 0 1 9/ 37 AR 0
    • Reintegration Programmes & Support Services STRENGTHENING THE GROUND - TRAIN THE TRAINERS WORKSHOP (FEBRUARY 2010) To prepare the Association for work in this field, a three-day training workshop aimed at equipping selected staff and senior volunteers with the basic skills to enhance their competence and effectiveness in various aspects of training was conducted by a certified training professional. A total of 8 staff and 4 volunteers attended the training. The workshop was both enjoyable and an eye-opener, interspersed with a variety of tips and games to make the sessions interesting. There was a mix of fun icebreakers, energisers and presentations to encourage a hands-on perspective of facilitation and presentation skills. This, the trainer pointed out, was crucial for any sharing of knowledge and experience to be effective. TRAINING FOR ISCOS PEER MENTORING PROGRAM (MARCH 2010) The Industrial and Services Co-operative Society Limited (ISCOS) has identified ex-offender mentors who have the passion to guide Reformative Trainees about to embark on their return to society via tagging and supervision. As part of its efforts to provide targeted training for the sector, SACA helped design a suitable package and facilitated the training of the mentors to better equip them with the necessary befriending skills. AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 38 CA
    • Planting more Seeds: New Developments II. TRAINING FOR HELPING PROFESSIONALS WORKING WITH OFFENDERS WITH MENTAL DISABILITY (MARCH 2010) As part of its efforts to help after-care professionals enhance their competency, SACA assisted in the design of a training package to help better equip caseworkers in their work with clients with some form of mental illness. Aftercare professionals from ISCOS, SCORE, SANA and SACA attended a 3-day workshop conducted by the Singapore Association for Mental Health. Topics included Understanding Mental Health and Treatment, Vocational Rehabilitation, Ethical Concerns and Criminology & Mental Illness. III. FACILITATION FOR PRISON STAFF FACILITATION OF CASE CONFERENCE FOR REINTEGRATION OFFICERS (SEPT 09 - FEB 10) Prison officers today not only provide their services in-care, they also have an additional role as Reintegration Officers, providing after-care supervision and support as well. SACA was engaged to facilitate case conferencing for the officers with regards to their newly acquired after-care support role. Through case conferences, the officers were able to share the challenges they had encountered and obtained support from a senior social worker. Thirty five officers attended the case conferences over the six month period. CA SA 0 1 9/ 39 AR 0
    • The Fruit of Longevity: Our Finances Corporate Governance Statement by The Management Committee Independent Auditor’s Report Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Funds Statement of Financial Activities Statement of Cash Flow Notes to the Financial Statements “ The bigger the navel of the orange is, the sweeter it will be.“
    • Staff Annual Salary Bands for FY2009/2010 1 Corporate Governance 2 $ 65,001 - 80,000 SACA complies with all 21 applicable guidelines of the 16 $ 50,001 - 65,000 Code of Governance Evaluation Checklist for Institutions ≤ $ 50,000 of a Public Character (IPCs). (Full checklist is available at www.charities.gov.sg) Statement by The Management Committee We, the undersigned, the management committee of Singapore After-Care Association do herby state that in the opinion of the management committee, the accompanying Statement of Financial Position, statement of financial activities, statement of changes in funds and statement of cash flow, together with the notes thereon, are properly drawn up so as to give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the SINGAPORE AFTER-CARE ASSOCIATION as at 31st March 2010 and of the results and of the changes in funds and cash flows for the year ended on that date. JEFFREY E.S. BEH ONG HIAN SUN JENNIFER MARIE CHAIRMAN HON. TREASURER HON. SECRETARY Dated: 11 August 2010 CA SA 0 1 9/ 41 AR 0
    • Independent Auditors’ Report to the Members of Singapore After-Care Association We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the SINGAPORE AFTER-CARE ASSOCIATION which comprise the Statement of Financial Position as at 31st March 2010, and the statement of financial activities, statement of changes in funds and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management committee is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with the Societies Act and Singapore Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: (a) devising and maintaining a system of internal controls sufficient to provide a reasonable assurance that assets are safeguarded against loss from unauthorized use or disposition: and transactions are properly authorized and that they are recorded as necessary to permit the preparation of true and fair income statement and Statement of Financial Position and to maintain accountability of assets; (b) selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and (c) making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Singapore Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Opinion In our opinion, (a) the financial statements are properly drawn up in accordance with the provisions of the Act and Singapore Financial Reporting Standards so as to give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the SINGAPORE AFTER-CARE ASSOCIATION as at 31st March 2010 and the results, changes in equity and cash flows of the company for the year ended on that date; and (b) the accounting and other records required by the Act to be kept by the Association have been properly kept in accordance with the provisions of the Act. K.S. NG & CO., AR 0 9/ Certified public accountants 1 0 SA 42 CA
    • Statement of Financial Position as at 31st March 2010 Note 2010 2009 S$ S$ ASSETS NON CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment 4 214,199 249,659 214,199 249,659 CURRENT ASSETS Other receivables 5 1,499 19,159 Prepayment 438 680 Cash & cash equivalents 6 848,335 876,706 850,272 896,545 TOTAL ASSETS 1,064,471 1,146,204 ACCUMULATED FUNDS UNRESTRICTED FUNDS 17 General Funds 502,641 392,602 RESTRICTED FUNDS 17 Volunteer Aftercare Programme 144,984 58,190 Case Management Framework Programme 164,561 148,617 Ex-offenders Assistance Scheme 103,619 100,858 Rebuilding Lives/ Homecoming Programme - 189,847 Education Support Programme - - Financial Assistance Fund 6,034 6,996 Renovation Fund - - Lee Foundation Education Assistance Scheme 49,816 18,903 Isaac Mannasseh Meyer Bursary 5,650 5,650 General Education Fund 31,963 33,372 506,627 562,433 TOTAL FUNDS 1,009,268 955,035 CURRENT LIABILITIES Other payables and accruals 7 17,103 16,169 Other liabilities 8 38,100 175,000 55,203 191,169 TOTAL FUNDS & LIABILITIES 1,064,471 1,146,204 CA SA 0 1 9/ 43 AR 0
    • Statement of Changes in Funds for the year ended 31st March 2010 Note Unrestricted Fund Restricted Fund Total S$ S$ S$ YEAR 17 Balance as at 31st March 2009 392,602 562,433 955,035 Over funding in prior years - (10,028) (10,028) Transfer of funds 120,415 (120,415) - Surplus (deficit) for the year (10,376) 74,637 64,261 Balance as at 31st March 2010 502,641 506,627 1,009,268 YEAR 17 Balance as at 31st March 2008 315,194 450,389 765,583 Over Funding in prior years - (12,603) (12,603) Transfer of funds 114,676 (114,676) - Surplus / (decifit) for the year (37,268) 239,323 202,055 Balance as at 31st March 2009 392,602 562,433 955,035 AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 44 CA
    • Statement of Financial Activities for the year ended 31st March 2010 Note 2010 2009 S$ S$ INCOME Unrestricted Fund 18 26,089 - Restricted Fund 18 Voluntary Income 849,309 1,065,910 Fund generating activities 113,654 107,120 Investment income 397 1,287 Other income 9,085 9,370 TOTAL INCOME 998,534 1,183,687 EXPENDITURE Unrestricted Fund 18 Depreciation 36,450 37,268 Restricted Fund 18 Costs of generating voluntary income 96,584 90,113 Costs of fund generating activities 5,551 30,733 Governance costs 795,688 823,518 897,823 944,364 TOTAL EXPENDITURE 934,273 981,632 Surplus transferred to Accumulated Funds 64,261 202,055 Allocation of Surplus as follows: Unrestricted Fund 18 (10,376) (37,268) Restricted Fund 18 74,637 239,323 64,261 202,055 CA SA 0 1 9/ 45 AR 0
    • Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended 31st March 2010 2010 2009 S$ S$ CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Net surplus for the year 64,261 202,055 Adjustment for: Depreciation 36,450 37,268 Operating surplus working capital changes 100,711 239,323 Change in operating assets & liabilities Other receivables 17,660 40,207 Prepayment 242 (680) Other payables and accruals 934 699 Other liabilities (136,900) 101,482 (118,064) 141,708 Cash generated from operations (17,353) 381,031 Net cash (outflow) / inflow from operating activities (17,353) 381,031 CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Purchase of plant & equipment (990) (12,968) Proceeds on Disposal of investment - 10,000 Net cash outflow from investing activities (990) (2,968) CASH FLOWS FROM RESTRICTED FUNDS Overfunding in prior year (10,028) (12,603) Net cash outflow from restricted activities (10,028) (12,603) Net (decrease) / increase in cash & cash equivalents (28,371) 365,460 Cash & Cash Equivalents at beginning of the year 876,706 511,246 Cash & Cash Equivalents at end off the year 848,335 876,706 ANALYSIS OF BALANCES OF CASH & CASH EQUIVALENTS Cash in hand 172 971 Cash at banks 848,163 875,735 848,335 876,706 AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 46 CA
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 These notes form an integral part of and should be read in conjunction with the 2.3 Adoption of Revised FRS and INT FRS accompanying financial statements. For the year ended 31st March 2010, the new and revised standards were not applicable to the Association. The future changes are not expected to have a 1. GENERAL INFORMATION material impact on the financial statement. The financial statements of SINGAPORE AFTER-CARE ASSOCIATION, for the financial year ended 31st March 2010 were authorised for issue on the date of the 2.4 Foreign currencies statement by the management committee. Functional and Presentation Currency Items included in the financial statements of the association are measured using The SINGAPORE AFTERCARE ASSOCIATION (SACA) was formed in 1956, and was the currency of the primary economic environment in which the entity operates registered as a voluntary welfare organisation in 24th October 1984 under the (“functional currency”). The financial statements are presented in Singapore Charities Act. Dollars, which is the association’s functional and presentation currency. The objectives of the association are to provide for the welfare, rehabilitation and 2.5 Property, Plant & Equipment counselling services of discharged prisoners after their release. Property, plant & equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and The association’s registered place of business is located at 81 Dunlop Street impairment losses. Depreciation is computed on a straight line basis over the Singapore 209408. estimated useful lives of the assets as follows :- 2. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Number of Years 2.1 Basis Of Preparation Building 20 The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Singapore Furniture & fittings 10 Financial Reporting Standards (FRS) including related interpretations. Office equipment 10 Renovation 10 The financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost convention and are presented in Singapore Dollars. Computer & peripherals 3 The accounting policies have been consistently applied by the association and are consistent with those used in the previous financial year, except for the changes Fully depreciated assets are retained in the accounts until they are no longer in in accounting policies as below. use. 2.2 Significant Accounting Estimates and Judgments The residual values and useful lives of plant & equipment are reviewed and adjusted as appropriate, at each balance sheet date. The effects of any revision of The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with FRS requires the the residual values and useful lives are included in the statement of financial use of judgement, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of activities. assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses 2.6 Impairment of non-financial assets during the financial year. Although these estimates are based on management’s best knowledge of current events and actions, actual results may ultimately differ The association assesses at each reporting date whether there is an indication from those estimates. that an asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, or when an annual impairment assessment for an asset is required, the association makes an Critical accounting estimates and assumptions used and areas involving a higher estimate of the asset’s recoverable amount. degree of judgement or complexity are disclosed in Notes 3. CA SA 0 1 9/ 47 AR 0
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 An asset’s recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s or cash-generating Loan and receivables unit’s fair value less costs to sell and its value in use and is determined for an Financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an individual asset, unless the asset does not generate cash inflows that are largely active market are classified as loans and receivables. Subsequent to initial independent of those from other assets. In assessing value in use, the estimated recognition, loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset are discounted to their effective interest method. Gains and losses are recognized in surplus or deficit present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market when the loans and receivables are derecognized or impaired, and through the assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. In amortization process. determining fair value less costs to sell, an appropriate valuation model is used. These calculations are corroborated by valuation multiples, quoted share prices 2.8 Impairment of Financial Assets for publicly traded subsidiaries or other available fair value indicators. Where the The association assesses at each statement of financial position date whether carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount, the asset is written there is any objective evidence that a financial asset is impaired. down to its recoverable amount. Impairment losses are recognized in the statement of financial activities. Assets carried at cost If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss on financial assets carried at An assessment is made at each reporting date as to whether there is any cost has been incurred, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference indication that previously recognized impairment losses may no longer exist or between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future may have decreased. A previously recognized impairment loss is reversed only if cash flows discounted at the current market rate for a similar financial asset. Such there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the asset’s impairment losses are not reversed in subsequent periods. recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognized. If that is the case, the carrying amount of the asset is increased to its recoverable amount, net 2.9 Cash and Cash Equivalents of depreciation, had no impairment loss be recognized previously. Such reversal Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash in hand, bank balances and highly liquid is recognized in the statement of financial activities. investments which are readily convertible to cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. 2.7 Financial assets Financial assets are recognized on the statement of financial position when, and Cash and cash equivalents are classified as loans and receivable under FRS 39. The only when, the association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the accounting policy for this category of financial assets is stated in Note 2.7. financial instrument. When financial assets are recognized initially, they are measured at fair value, plus, in the case of financial assets not at fair value 2.10 Receivables through surplus or deficit, directly attributable transaction costs. A financial asset Receivables are recognized initially at fair value and subsequently measured at is derecognized where the contractual rights to receive cash flows from the asset amortised cost using the effective interest method, less allowance for impairment. have expired. On derecognition of a financial asset in its entirety, the difference An allowance for impairment of receivables is established when there is objective between the carrying amount and the sum of the consideration received and any evidence that the association will not be able to collect all amounts due according cumulative gain or loss that has been recognized directly in equity is recognized to the original terms of the receivables. The amount of the allowance is the in statement of financial activities. All regular way purchases and sales of financial difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of assets are recognized or derecognized on the trade date i.e., the date that the estimated future cash flows, discounted at the original effective interest rate. The association commits to purchase or sell the asset. Regular way purchases or sales amount of the allowance loss is recognised in the Statement of financial activities. are purchases or sales of financial assets that require delivery of assets within the Trade and other receivables are classified as loans and receivable under FRS 39. period generally established by regulation or convention in the marketplace The accounting policy for this category of financial assets is stated in Note 2.7. concerned. AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 48 CA
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 2.11 Funds 2.14 Provisions Fund balances restricted by outside sources are so indicated and are distinguished Provisions are recognized when the association has a present obligation (legal or from unrestricted funds allocated to specific purposes if any action of the constructive) as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources management. Externally restricted funds may only be utilized in accordance with embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation and a the purpose established by the source of such funds or through the terms of an reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. appeal and are in contrast with unrestricted funds over which management retains full control to use in achieving any of its institutional purposes. An Provisions are reviewed at each balance sheet date and adjusted to reflect the expenses resulting from the operating activities of a fund that is charged to that current best estimate. If it is no longer probably that an outflow of economic fund. Common expenses if any are allocated on a reasonable basis to the funds resources will be required to settle the obligation, the provision is reversed. If the base on a method most suitable to that common expense. effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are discounted using a current pre tax rate that reflects, which appropriate, the risks specific to the 2.12 Financial Liabilities liability. When discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the Financial liabilities within the scope of FRS 39 are recognized on the statement of passage of time is recognized as a finance cost. financial position when, and only when, the association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the financial instrument. 2.15 Grants Grants are recognized at their fair value when there is reasonable assurance that Financial liabilities are recognized initially at fair value, plus, in the case of the grant will be received and all attaching conditions will be compiled with. financial liabilities other than derivatives, directly attributable transaction costs. Where the grant relates to an asset, the fair value is recognized as deferred Subsequent to initial recognition, all financial liabilities (except for financial capital grant on the statement of financial position and is amortised to profit or guarantee) are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. loss over the expected useful life of the relevant asset by equal annual installments. For financial liabilities other than derivatives, gains and losses are recognized in surplus or deficit when the liabilities are derecognized, and through the 2.16 Leases amortization process. The determination of whether an arrangement is, or contains a lease is based on the substance of the arrangement at inception date: whether fulfillment of the Any gains or losses arising from changes in fair value of derivatives are arrangement is dependent on the use of a specific asset or assets or the recognized in surplus or decifit. Net gains or losses on derivatives include arrangement conveys a right to use the asset. For arrangements entered into exchange differences. prior to 1 January 2005, the date of inception is deemed to be 1 January 2005 in accordance with the transitional requirements of INT FRS 104. A financial liability is derecognized when the obligation under the liability is extinguished. When an existing financial liability is replaced by another from the (a) As lessee same lender on substantially different terms, or the terms of an existing liability Operating lease payments are recognized as an expense in statement of financial are substantially modified, such an exchange or modification is treated as a activities on a straight line basis over the lease term. The aggregate benefit of derecognizing of the original liability and the recognition of a new liability, and the incentives provided by the lessor is recognized as a reduction of rental expense difference in the respective carrying amounts is recognized in the statement of over the lease term on a straight-line basis. financial activities. (b) As lessor 2.13 Payables Leases where the association retains substantially all the risks and rewards of Payables are recognized initially at fair value and subsequently measured at ownership of the asset lease term, are classified as operating leases. Initial direct amortised cost using the effective interest method. Other payables are classified costs incurred in negotiating an operating lease are added to the carrying amount as financial liabilities under FRS 39. The accounting policy for this category of of the leased asset and recognized over the lease term on the same bases as financial assets is stated in Note 2.12. rental income. The accounting policy for rental income is set out in Note 2.17. CA SA 0 1 9/ 49 AR 0
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 2.17 Recognition of Income 2.19 Employee Benefits Income in respect of the following are recognised as follows:- (i) Defined Contribution Plan (i) Interest income – recognized on an effective interest basis As required by the law; the association makes contributions to the state pension (ii) Membership subscription – subscriptions are accounted for scheme, the Central Provident Fund (CPF), a defined contribution pension scheme. as income in the year to which they relate CPF contributions are recognised as compensation expenses in the same period (iii) Programme fees - actual basis over the duration of the as the employment was performed. programme (iv) Rental income - accounted for on a straight-line basis over . SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING JUDGMENTS AND ESTIMATES the lease terms Estimates, assumptions and judgements are continually evaluated and are based (v) Donations – upon receipt of donations on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. 2.18 Taxation There are no significant assumptions or estimates made at the financial year end No provision for taxation is necessary as the association is an approved that have a significant risk of resulting in a material adjustment to the carrying charitable institution and is exempted from tax. amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year. 4. PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT Building at Furniture Office Computer & Dunlop Street & Fittings Equipment Renovation Peripherals Total S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ COST At 01.04.2008 109,408 44,195 10,397 222,039 8,036 394,075 Additions ~ ~ 518 10,910 1,540 12,968 At 31.03.2009 109,408 44,195 10,915 232,949 9,576 407,043 Additions ~ 250 740 ~ ~ 990 At 31.03.2010 109,408 44,445 11,655 232,949 9,576 408,033 ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION At 01.04.2008 ~ 22,085 5,221 88,815 3,995 120,116 Charge for the year 5,470 4,419 1,092 23,295 2,992 37,268 At 31.03.2009 5,470 26,504 6,313 112,110 6,987 157,384 Charge for the year 5,470 4,444 1,166 23,295 2,075 36,450 At 31.03.2010 10,940 30,948 7,479 135,405 9,062 193,834 NET BOOK VALUE At 31.03.2009 103,938 17,691 4,602 120,839 2,689 249,659 At 31.03.2010 98,468 13,497 4,176 97,544 514 214,199 AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 50 CA
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 5. OTHER RECEIVABLES 9. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT COSTS 2010 2009 2010 2009 S$ S$ S$ S$ Grant receivable ~ 17,910 Define contribution plan 90,054 90,803 Other receivable 149 149 Salaries & bonus 663,613 679,492 Sundry deposit 1,350 1,100 Other staff benefit - transport expenses 20,116 19,700 1,499 19,159 Less: Jobs credit collection (51,014) (14,279) 722,769 775,716 Other receivables are unsecured, interest free and are repayment on demand. 10. INCOME TAX 6. CASH & CASH EQUIVALENTS No provision for taxation is necessary as the Association is an approved charitable institution and its income is exempted from tax. 2010 2009 S$ S$ 11. COMMITMENTS Cash in hand 172 971 As at balance sheet date, the Association has no material operating lease Cash at banks 848,163 875,735 commitments. 848,335 876,706 12. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL For the purposes of these financial statements, parties are considered to Cash at bank bear interest approximately 0.001% (2009 : 0.001%) per annum. be related to the association if the association has the ability, directly or Cash & Cash equivalents are denominated in Singapore dollars and the carrying indirectly, to control the party or exercise significant influence over the amounts approximate their fair value. party in making financial and operating decisions, or vice versa, or where the association and the party are subject to common control or common significant influence. Related parties may be individuals or other entities. 7. OTHER PAYABLES AND ACCRUALS 2010 2009 Key management personnel of the association are those persons having the S$ S$ authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the association. The Board of Management and the senior management officers are considered as key management personnel of the association. Accrued expenses 17,103 16,169 Compensation of key management personnel 2010 2009 8. OTHER LIABILITIES S$ S$ 2010 2009 Salaries and other short-term employee benefits 287,764 291,366 S$ S$ Defined contribution plans 38,797 39,620 Other benefits - transport expenses 7,200 7,200 Advance funds received 38,100 175,000 333,761 338,186 CA SA 0 1 9/ 51 AR 0
    • Notes to the Financial Statement 31st March 2010 Number of key management in remuneration bands (b) Fair value of financial instruments that are not carried at fair value and 2010 2009 whose carrying amount are resonable approximation of fair value S$ S$ Other receivables (note 5), cash and cash equivalents (note 6), other $50,001 to $100,000 2 2 payables and accruals (note 7) Below or equal to $50,000 4 4 The carrying amount of these financial assets and liabilities are resonable 6 6 approximation of fair values, due to their short-term nature. (c ) Fair value of financial instruments that are not carried at fair value and 13. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS whose carrying amount are not resonable approximation of fair value There are no finaicial instruments carried at fair value and whose carrying The following table set out the financial instruments amount are not approximation of fair value. as at the end of the reporting period. 2010 2009 15. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT S$ S$ The Association is exposed to financial risks arising from its operations and the use (a) Financial assets of financial instruments. The key financial risks include liquidity risk. The Other receivables (note 5) 1,499 19,159 Association is not subject to any significant credit risk, foreign exchange risk, Cash and cash equivalents (note 6) 848,335 876,706 interest rate risk and market price risk. The Committee reviews and agrees policies and procedures for the management of these risks, which are executed by the Total loans and receivables 849,834 895,865 Management Committee. It is, and has been throughout the current and previous financial year, the Association's policy that no derivatives shall be undertaken. (b) Financial liabilities The Association do not apply hedge accounting. Other payables and accruals (note 7) 17,103 16,169 Total financial liabilities carried at amortised cost 17,103 16,169 The following sections provide details regarding the Association's exposure to the above-mentioned financial risks and the objectives, policies and processes for the management of these risks. 14. FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS Liquidity risk The Association adopted the amendment to FRS 107 which requires disclosure of fair Liquidity risk is the risk that the Association will encounter difficulty in meeting value measurements by level of the following fair value measurement hierarchy: financial obligations due to the shortage of funds. The Association's exposure to liquidity risk arises primarily from mismatches of the maturities of financial assets ~ quotes prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identifiable assets or liabilities and liabilities. (level 1) ~ inputs other than quoted prices included withink Level 1 that are observable To manage liquidity risk, the Association monitors its net operating cash flow by for the asset or liability, either directly (i.e. as prices) or indirectly (i.e. derived reviewing its working capital requirements regularly, and maintains an adequate from prices (Level 2); and level of cash and cash equivalents. ~ inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data All financial liabilities of the Association are due within one year. (unobservable inputs) (Level 3). The Association has sufficient cash balances to support cash commitments from (a) Fair value of financial instruments that are carried at fair value their existing liabilities. There are no financial instruments carried at fair value AR 0 9/ The Association does not have any banking facilities. 1 0 SA 52 CA
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 16. COMPARATIVE FIGURES Certain reclassification have been made to the prior year's financial statements to enhance comparability with current year's financial statements. These reclassification were not significant. 17. DETAILED CHANGES OF FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st MARCH 2010 Unrestricted Restricted Fund 2010 Fund 2010 Lee Case Rebuilding Foundation Isaac Volunteer Management Ex-Offenders Lives / Education Financial Education Mannasseh General Total General After-Care Framework Assistance Homecoming Support Assistance Renovation Assistance Meyer Education Restricted Total Fund Program Program Scheme Program Program Fund Fund Scheme Bursary Fund Funds Funds S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ YEAR 2010 Balance as at 31st March 2009 392,602 58,190 148,617 100,858 189,847 - 6,996 - 18,903 5,650 33,372 562,433 955,035 Over funding in prior years - (10,028) - - - - - - - - - (10,028) (10,028) Transfer of funds 120,415 - - - (189,847) 69,432 - - - - - (120,415) - Surplus / (deficit) for the year (10,376) 96,822 15,944 2,761 - (69,432) (962) - 30,913 - (1,409) 74,637 64,261 Balance as at 31st March 2010 502,641 144,984 164,561 103,619 - - 6,034 - 49,816 5,650 31,963 506,627 1,009,268 YEAR 2009 Balance as at 31st March 2008 315,194 14,131 112,421 77,396 50,505 4,685 (761) 133,224 15,959 7,300 35,529 450,389 765,583 Over funding in prior years - (16,290) 3,687 - - - - - - - - (12,603) (12,603) Transfer of funds 114,676 - - - - 18,548 - (133,224) - - - (114,676) - Surplus / (deficit) for the year (37,268) 60,349 32,509 23,462 139,342 (23,233) 7,757 - 2,944 (1,650) (2,157) 239,323 202,055 Balance as at 31st March 2009 392,602 58,190 148,617 100,858 189,847 - 6,996 - 18,903 5,600 33,372 562,433 955,035 CA SA 0 1 9/ 53 AR 0
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 18. DETAILED FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st MARCH 2010 Unrestricted Restricted Fund 2010 Fund 2010 Lee Case Foundation Isaac Volunteer Management Ex-Offenders Education Financial Education Mannasseh General Total General After-Care Framework Assistance Support Assistance Assistance Meyer Education Restricted Fund Program Program Scheme Program Fund Scheme Bursary Fund Funds S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ INCOME Voluntary Income Prison Funding 26,089 130,698 189,876 - - - - - - 320,574 Prison Funding - After-Care Professionalisation - 36,960 - - - - - - - 36,960 NCSS Funding - - 68,707 59,912 - - - - - 128,619 SCORE Funding - - 71,991 - - - - - - 71,991 Yellow Ribbon Funding - 87,500 - - - 4,838 - - - 92,338 Designated Project Donation: Ex-offenders Assistance Scheme - - - 174 - - - - - 174 Education Support Programme Funding - - - - 8,000 - - - - 8,000 Financial Assistance Fund - - - - - 1,500 - - - 1,500 Lee Foundation Education Assistance Scheme - - - - - - 100,000 - - 100,000 General Education Fund - SACA A/C2 - - - - - - - - 2,888 2,888 General Donations - 34,362 25,772 17,181 8,590 - - - - 85,905 Sponsorships-subsidy - 144 108 72 36 - - - - 360 Total Voluntary Income 26,089 289,664 356,454 77,339 16,626 6,338 100,000 - 2,888 849,309 Fund Generating Activities Fund Raising Projects - Charity Film Premiere - 44,560 33,420 22,280 11,140 - - - - 111,400 - SACA Appreciation Night Funding - 2,200 - - - - - - - 2,200 - Others - 21 16 11 6 - - - - 54 Total Fund Generating Activities - 46,781 33,436 22,291 11,146 - - - - 113,654 Investment Income Interest earned on fixed deposits/autosave - 104 78 52 25 - - - - 259 Investment income - SACA A/C2 - - - - - - 138 - - 138 Total Investment Income - 104 78 52 25 - 138 - - 397 Other Income Rental Income - 3,458 2,594 1,729 864 - - - 8,645 Membership fees - 176 132 88 44 - - - 440 Total Other Income - 3,634 2,726 1,817 908 - - - - 9,085 AR 0 9/ TOTAL INCOME 26,089 340,183 392,694 101,499 28,705 6,338 100,138 - 2,888 972,445 1 0 54 SA CA
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2010 18. DETAILED FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st MARCH 2010 Unrestricted Restricted Fund 2010 Fund 2010 Lee Case Foundation Isaac Volunteer Management Ex-Offenders Education Financial Education Mannasseh General Total General After-Care Framework Assistance Support Assistance Assistance Meyer Education Restricted Fund Program Program Scheme Program Fund Scheme Bursary Fund Funds S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ EXPENDITURE Costs of generating Voluntary Income CMF Expenses - - 355 - - - - - - 355 Education Support Services - - - - 433 - - - - 433 Rebuilding Lives / Homecoming programme 15 - - - - - - - - 0 General Education Fund Scheme - - - - - - - - 4,297 4,297 Lee Foundation Education Assistance Scheme - - - - - - 69,181 - - 69,181 Financial Assistance Fund - Cash aids - - - - - 1,131 - - - 1,131 - Families assistance - - - - - 1,500 - - - 1,500 - YRF Emergency Fund Disbursements - - - - - 4,669 - - - 4,669 Volunteer Development & Recognition - 1,460 - - - - - - - 1,460 Aftercare Professionalisation expenses - 888 - - - - - - - 888 SACA Appreciation Night - 12,655 - - - - - - - 12,655 Total costs of generating Voluntary Income 15 15,003 355 - 433 7,300 69,181 - 4,297 96,569 Costs of Fund Generating Activities Charity Film Premiere - 2,215 1,661 1,107 554 - - - - 5,537 Online Donation Portal fees - 6 4 3 1 - - - - 14 Total Costs of Fund Generating Activities - 2,221 1,665 1,110 555 - - - - 5,551 Governance Costs Bank Charges - 38 28 19 9 - 44 - - 138 Depreciation 36,450 - - - - - - - - 0 Building Insurance - 561 421 282 140 - - - - 1,404 Public Education & Awareness - 1,858 1,394 930 463 - - - - 4,645 Printing & stationery - 2,360 1,770 1,180 590 - - - - 5,900 Recruitment Expenses 430 344 774 Repair & Replacement of Equipment - 6,084 4,563 3,042 1,521 - - - - 15,210 Rental of Equipment - 2,221 1,667 1,110 554 - - - - 5,552 Supplies & Materials - 1,433 1,075 718 357 - - - - 3,583 Salaries, Bonus & CPF - 194,391 339,103 83,073 86,086 - - - - 702,653 Staff welfare & training - 4,572 7,681 1,265 2,262 - - - - 15,780 Subscription fee - 196 148 98 50 - - - - 492 Telephone communication - 2,119 1,589 1,060 530 - - - - 5,298 Transport expenses - 4,217 10,704 2,023 3,172 - - - - 20,116 Water & Electricity - 4,344 3,258 2,172 1,086 - - - - 10,860 Input GST - 1,313 985 656 329 - - - - 3,283 Total Governance Costs 36,450 226,137 374,730 97,628 97,149 - 44 - - 795,688 TOTAL EXPENDITURE 36,465 243,361 376,750 98,738 98,137 7,300 69,225 - 4,297 897,808 Surplus / (deficit) for the year (10,376) 96,822 15,944 2,761 (69,432) (962) 30,913 - (1,409) 74,637 CA SA 0 1 9/ 55 AR 0
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2009 18. DETAILED CHANGES OF FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st MARCH 2009 Unrestricted Restricted Fund 2009 Fund 2009 Lee Case Rebuilding Foundation Isaac Volunteer Management Ex-Offenders Lives / Education Financial Education Mannasseh General Total General After-Care Framework Assistance Homecoming Support Assistance Assistance Meyer Education Restricted Fund Program Program Scheme Program Program Fund Scheme Bursary Fund Funds S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ INCOME Voluntary Income Prison Funding - 130,698 157,718 21,600 255,637 - - - - - 565,853 NCSS Funding - - 75,135 51,988 - - - - - - 127,103 NCSS Funding - Renovations - 2,383 1,191 1,191 596 596 - - - - 5,957 NCSS - VCF Research Grants - 440 220 220 110 110 - - - - 1,100 NCSS - Training grants - - - - 250 - - - - - 250 SCORE Funding - - 47,315 - - - - - - - 47,315 Yellow Ribbon Funding - 98,538 10 10 5 5 2,183 - - - 100,751 Designated Project Donation: Volunteer After-Care Programme Fund - 640 - - - - - - - - 640 Ex-offenders Assistance Scheme - - - 55,598 - - - - - - 55,598 Education Support Programme Funding - - - - - 28,000 - - - - 28,000 Financial Assistance Fund - - - - - - 10,600 - - - 10,600 Lee Foundation Education Assistance Scheme - - - - - - - 68,000 - - 68,000 General Donations - 21,833 10,917 10,917 5,458 5,458 - ~ - - 54,583 Sponsorships - Subsidy - 144 72 72 36 36 - ~ - - 360 Total Voluntary Income - 254,676 292,578 141,576 262,092 34,205 12,783 68,000 - - 1,065,910 Fund Generating Activities Fund Raising Projects - Charity Film Premiere - 42,464 21,232 21,232 10,616 10,616 - - - - 106,160 - Other - 384 192 192 96 96 - - - - 960 Total Fund Generating Activities - 42,848 21,424 21,424 10,712 10,712 - - - - 107,120 Investment Income Interest earned on fixed deposits / autosave - 417 209 209 104 104 - - - - 1,043 Investment Income - SACA A/C 2 - - - - - - - 244 - - 244 Total Investment Income - 417 209 209 104 104 - 244 - - 1,287 Other Income Rental Income - 3,540 1,770 1,770 885 885 - - - - 8,850 Membership fees - 208 104 104 52 52 - - - - 520 Total Other Income - 3,748 1,874 1,874 937 937 - - - - 9,370 AR 0 TOTAL INCOME - 301,689 316,085 165,083 273,845 45,958 12,783 68,244 - - 1,183,687 9/ 1 0 SA 56 CA
    • Notes to the Financial Statement for the year ended 31st March 2009 18. DETAILED CHANGES OF FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st MARCH 2009 Unrestricted Restricted Fund 2009 Fund 2009 Lee Case Rebuilding Foundation Isaac Volunteer Management Ex-Offenders Lives / Education Financial Education Mannasseh General Total General After-Care Framework Assistance Homecoming Support Assistance Assistance Meyer Education Restricted Fund Program Program Scheme Program Program Fund Scheme Bursary Fund Funds S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ S$ EXPENDITURE Costs of Generating Voluntary Income CMF Expenses - - 669 - - - - - - - 669 Education Support Services - - - - - 206 - - - - 206 Rebuilding Lives / Homecoming programme - - - - 10,756 - - - - - 10,756 Issac Mannaseh Meyer Bursary - - - - - - - - 1,650 - 1,650 General Education Fund Scheme - - - - - - - - - 2,157 2,157 Lee Foundation Education Assistance Scheme - - - - - - - 65,256 - - 65,256 Financial Assistance Fund - Cash aids - - - - - - 1,679 - - - 1,679 - Families Assistance - - - - - - 600 - - - 600 - YRF Emergency Fund Disbursements - - - - - - 2,747 - - - 2,747 Volunteer Development & Recognition - 4,393 - - - - - - - - 4,393 Total costs of generating voluntary income - 4,393 669 - 10,756 206 5,026 65,256 1,650 2,157 90,113 Costs of Fund Generating Activities SACA Appreciation Night - 11,651 - - - - - - - - 11,651 Soccer Event - VAP - 2,386 - - - - - - - - 2,386 Holiday Program - 1,962 981 981 492 491 - - - - 4,907 Charity Film Premiere - 4,713 2,357 2,357 1,178 1,178 - - - - 11,783 Online Donation Portal fees - 2 1 1 1 1 - - - - 6 Total costs of fund generating activities - 20,714 3,339 3,339 1,671 1,670 - - - - 30,733 Governance Cost Advertisement & Publicity - 320 344 - - - - - - - 664 Bank charges - 26 13 13 6 6 - 44 - - 108 Depreciation 37,268 - - - - - - - - - - Insurance - 562 281 281 140 140 - - - - 1,404 Public Education & Awarness - 1,040 520 520 260 260 - - - - 2,600 Printing & stationery - 1,920 960 960 480 480 - - - - 4,800 Repair & replacement of equipment - 5,327 2,663 2,663 1,332 1,332 - - - - 13,317 Rental equipment - 2,484 1,242 1,242 621 621 - - - - 6,210 Supplies & materials - 1,842 921 921 460 460 - - - - 4,604 Salaries, bonus & CPF - 186,698 257,216 122,906 110,470 59,025 - - - - 736,315 Staff welfare & training - 2,973 2,960 1,028 1,824 668 - - - - 9,453 Subscription fees - 167 84 84 42 42 - - - - 419 Telephone communications - 2,036 1,018 1,018 509 509 - - - - 5,090 Transport expenses - 3,304 7,579 2,879 4,049 1,889 - - - - 19,700 Water & electricity - 5,037 2,519 2,519 1,259 1,259 - - - - 12,593 Input GST - 2,497 1,248 1,248 624 624 - - - - 6,241 Total Governance cost 37,268 216,233 279,568 138,282 122,076 67,315 - 44 - - 823,518 TOTAL EXPENDITURE 37,268 241,340 283,576 141,621 134,503 69,191 5,026 65,300 1,650 2,157 944,364 Surplus / (decifit) for the year (37,268) 60,349 32,509 23,462 139,342 (23,233) 7,757 2,944 (1,650) (2,157) 239,323 CA SA 0 1 9/ 57 AR 0
    • Acknowledgements Managing Editor Christine Ng Sub-Editor Davis Pacific Group Pte Ltd Prem Kumar Writers Dawn Yet Chua Boon Tee Noor Haslinda Bte Mohd So’od Lin Mingjie Monica Ma Punitha Gunasegaran Contributors Sebastian Choo Goh Guat Tiang Nur Farhana Binte Che Yusof Ani Noraishikin Binte Ismail Jess Choo Designer Agnes Lim AR 0 9/ 1 0 SA 58 CA
    • “ Don't be afraid to go out on a limb. That's where the fruit is.“ H Jackson Browne * Please delete whichever is not applicable. DONATION FORM Name (Mr/Ms/Mrs/Mdm/Dr)* : ed (Please underline surname) Ne Address in NRIC/FIN No (for automated tax deduction) se Contact No (H) (H/P) tho E-mail fo r sket I enclose herewith the sum of $ by cheque (No: ) being my donation to SACA for their continuation of programmes for ex-offenders and their families. ur Ba Please include me in your mailing list for SPARKS (quarterly newsletter) Please notify me of future fundraising events Please update me on how my donation has been used Help us Fi l l o Signature of Donor Date Other forms of donation : 1) Via Credit Card : www.sggives.org.sg 2) Via Internet Banking / Giro : SACA Bank Account No. 011-700188-1 3) Please make cheque payable to Singapore After-Care Association, attach the cheque with this form and mail it to the contact and address indicated below. Contact Person : Ms Christine Ng Manager, Communications and Partnerships Address : Singapore After-Care Association 81 Dunlop Street, Singapore 209408 Email : christine@saca.org.sg
    • * Please delete whichever is not applicable. “ Balance, peace, and joy the fruit of a successful life. VOLUNTEER FORM It starts with recognizing your talents and finding ways to Name (Mr/Ms/Mrs/Mdm/Dr)* : serve others by using them.“ Age Nationality Thomas Kinkade Contact No E-mail Knowledge of languages and dialects (a) Written (b) Spoken Current involvement in other voluntary organisation(s), if any : Name of Organisation Nature of voluntary work Experience in counselling / counselling-related work (a) Experience (please specify nature) : Reason for choosing to volunteer with SACA : Area of interest in volunteering (tick all that apply) : i. - Befriending adult ex-offenders ii. - Befriending young ex-offenders (male) iii. Plan and organise programmes for young ex-offenders iv. Conduct group-work programmes for pre-release inmates in prison v. Tutoring. Please list subject(s) you can teach : for ‘N’, ‘O’ or ‘A’ levels for Polytechnic levels vi. Conduct enrichment courses for clients on SACA’s Education Prog. Please list the courses you can facilitate : vii. Publicity and fund-raising activities viii. Others (specify) :
    • Singapore After-Care Association 81 Dunlop Street Singapore 209408 Tel: 6294 2350 / 6294 2763 Fax: 6295 0095 Email: enquiries@saca.org.sg Visit us at www.saca.org.sg Helping Ex-Offenders and Their Families Get Back On Their Feet