Why was malaya against merger at first
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Why was malaya against merger at first

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Why was malaya against merger at first Why was malaya against merger at first Presentation Transcript

  • Why was Malaya against merger at first
  • Organisation of points
    There were both racial and political factors
    Both factors can be organised to form a coherent explanation
    Under each factor, there are several details
    It is important to note that both racial and and political factors can overlap
  • Linking words and phrases
    Important to connect ideas to express a clear understanding of a given situation
    Linking words and phrases help to connect such ideas
    Examples include “moreover”, “as a result”, “but”, “thus” etc.
  • POLITICAL FACTOR
  • Situation in Singapore
    Singapore in the late 1950s and early 1960s had a Chinese majority.
    Many members of the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) were Chinese.
  • Communist soldiers in Malaya
  • Situation in China
    Many Chinese were believed to be loyal to China.
    The People’s Republic of China was officially founded in 1949 and was Asia’s first and largest Communist nation.
  • Loyalty of Chinese to China
  • Situation in Malaya
    On the other hand, Malaya was a democratic and capitalist country.
    Furthermore, Malaya had successfully handled its own problems with the Communists by 1960.
  • Malaya’s successful campaign against Communists by 1960s
  • Result
    Thus, KL feared that Communist influence would spread if Singapore was part of Malaya.
  • Conclusion
    Therefore, Malaya was not keen on merger with Singapore.
  • RACIAL FACTOR
  • Situation in Singapore
    Singapore in the late 1950s and early 1960s had a Chinese majority.
  • Situation in Malaya
    Malaya in the late 1950s and early 1960s also had a large Chinese population.
  • Result
    Thus, Singapore and Malaya combined would have a Chinese population that outnumbered the Malays.
  • Start of racial riots between Malays and Chinese
  • Elaboration why this was not acceptable – on the ‘side’ of the Malays
    The Tungku was the leader of the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO).
    UMNO represented the interests of the Malay population in Malaya.
  • Political logo of UMNO
  • Elaborationwhy this was not acceptable – on the ‘side’ of the Chinese
    Furthermore, many Chinese were believed to be loyal to China.
  • A poster from Communist China
  • Conclusion
    Therefore, Malaya was not keen on merger with Singapore.