Change is good...when you manage it properly.
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Change is good...when you manage it properly.

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Xerox on how Change Management makes workplace transformation easier.

Xerox on how Change Management makes workplace transformation easier.

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  • Avoid trying to roll out Change Management (CM) based on a one-size-fits-all, prepackaged program. <br />
  • Identifying these and other FUD factors up front, before the implementation takes place, can ensure that you get ahead of them with appropriate communications and training. <br /> Fear: There’s a nebulous fear that accompanies any change, and some very specific ones. <br /> Uncertainty: It’s natural for there to be confusion and questions around a change. Rarely is something so obvious that everyone understands without explanation. And when the change is to a technology or process that isn’t necessarily broken, well, the uncertainty factor goes way up. <br /> Perhaps the most caustic factor is doubt because it provides an internal excuse for non-engagement. Doubt comes in many forms. <br />

Change is good...when you manage it properly. Change is good...when you manage it properly. Presentation Transcript

  • Change is good… when you manage it properly.
  • How do you define change management? • Address the cultural issues of managing the resistance and discomfort experienced by people in an organization when new processes or technologies are introduced. • Help employees gain acceptance and adoption of a new program and think differently. • Includes extensive listening, marketing communications, customized process improvements and training. • The goal is to ultimately change behaviors and turn them into best practices. • The more customized the program is to the specific audience, the better. December 3, 2013 2
  • No Such Thing as “One Size Fits All” •Any good Change Management program should be uniquely suited to goals and challenges of that situation. •It should not be treated as an optional “bolt-on” component to full implementations, essentially an afterthought. If you’re not factoring in Change Management up front, you could end up wasting a lot of time and money on your implementation. December 3, 2013 3
  • Measuring Success: Critically Important A customized measurement approach can be the most informative. Even so, here are a few of the primary measures: • End-user adoption rates • Time to achieve expected savings • Percentage trained vs. percentage effectively trained, which requires evaluation of behavior change • End-user satisfaction • Overall client satisfaction, if working with a third party December 3, 2013 4
  • Executive Sponsorship Key to Success He or she works with a: • • • • • Bullet Bullet Bullet Bullet Bullet 1 2 3 4 5 lorem ipsum lorem ipsum lorem ipsum lorem ipsum lorem ipsum Change Management consultant and the Client Change Management Team member to approve the strategy, tactical plan and associated messaging. Public Relations, Human Resources or Internal Marketing & Communications representative to build the strategy and tactical plan.
  • What to Look Out For— FUD Factors Fear Uncertainty Doubt •Fear of learning something new. I’m good at this, what if I’m not good at that? • Wondering if and how their role will change. Will I lose power or status? • Don’t believe the change is necessary. • Fear of new expectations. What if I can’t meet them? • Confused by communication that does not deliver a consistent message. •Fear of technology and new processes that require it. I barely use my cell phone, let alone apps. •Fear of obsolescence, particularly with outsourcing of any kind. My skills may not be needed any more. December 3, 2013 • Unclear about the what and the why of a change. Multiple and/or detailed explanations may be required. • Not involved in decision to change, therefore no stake in its success. • Question executive sponsorship and commitment. • “Temporary” behavior change until it’s safe to go back to business as usual. • View program as a project with an end and beginning, not as a culture shift. 6
  • 4 Part Plan for a Smooth Transition 1 2 Tailored Communications You can gain buy-in well before a transition with frequent communications about how a change will make everyone’s work easier, as well as benefit the entire organization. Tailor Changes to Support Work Practices Your Change Management partner should understand each user’s needs and strive to support—and improve—those processes. 4 3 Training to Maximize Adoption Transition/“Go-Live” Support Organized training for small groups of users will acquaint everyone with new processes and get them comfortable. A Change Management professional should be available either on-site or on call to help ease the transition from old to new and answer any questions. By making sure you have these four steps in place, you help reduce the fear and anxiety that usually surround change. December 3, 2013 7
  • For more valuable insights, visit GetOptimistic.com Presented by Xerox