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Thinking Hybrid - Python/C++ Integration

by bogan at Under the Bridge on Dec 17, 2007

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Talk on integrating native C++ sensibly into Python for ease of use of the code base. Inheriting from C++ classes, overriding functionality, automatically generating the bindings using Py++ and ...

Talk on integrating native C++ sensibly into Python for ease of use of the code base. Inheriting from C++ classes, overriding functionality, automatically generating the bindings using Py++ and SCons.

Code demonstrated in the presentation can be found here:

http://www.kloss-familie.de/moin/TalksPresentations

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  • AloneRoad Phạm Tuấn Anh, CEO & Founder at 5works Học cách trình bày ở đây 3 years ago
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  • XEmacs XEmacs Slartibartfast, bogan at Under the Bridge That's exactly the thing that makes C/C++ so different from most other languages. It distinguishes between reference and value calls. Python does not know about these things. People have tried to resolve this problem by trying to guess which calling method is correct in a place. But as in the Zen of Python is already stated 'Explicit is better than implicit.' So we don't want the system to guess as things can go terribly wrong. Therefore, so called 'calling policies' (mentioned on slide 32 in the flash animation here) have to be used to disambiguate in a way that the programmer wants. 6 years ago
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Thinking Hybrid - Python/C++ Integration Thinking Hybrid - Python/C++ Integration Presentation Transcript