Wimek talents & topics

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Wimek talents & topics

  1. 1. WIMEK talents & topicsPublish like a proWouter Gerritsma, Wageningen UR Library
  2. 2. Not your average publishing tips
  3. 3. Roadmap Introduction Why publish? Where to publish? Citation impact Publishing tips
  4. 4. Introductionhttp://wowter.nethttp://twitter.com/wowterhttp://nl.linkedin.com/in/wowterwouter.gerritsma@wur.nl
  5. 5. Where to publish? A valued journal? ● Editorial board ● Acceptance rate ● Time to publication ● Journal circulation ● Visibility ● Journal performance
  6. 6. Journal performance measures (indicators) Journal Citation Reports (JCR) ● a.o. standard Journal Impact Factor and 5-year Impact Factor Scopus Journal Analyzer (SJA) ● Scimago Journal Rank (SJR) prestige metric based on the idea that ‘all citations are not created equal’ ● Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) Measures contextual citation impact by ‘normalizing’ citation values
  7. 7. Baselines for Mathematics
  8. 8. Baselines for Molecular Biology 400 Baseline Cumulative no. citations 300 top 10% top 1% 200 100 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Years after publication
  9. 9. Bibliometric indicators: An example Zee, F.P.v.d., G. Lettinga & J.A. Field (2001) Azo dye decolourisation by anaerobic granular sludge. Chemosphere 44:1169-1176. ● Citations from WoS: 94 Journal: Chemosphere ● Categorised by ESI in Environment/Ecology Baseline data for Environment/Ecology. ● Article from 2001 in Environment/ecology: ● On average: 19.36 citations; top 10%: 44 citations; top1%: 141 citations Relative Impact: 94 / 19.36 = 4.9
  10. 10. h-index A scientist has index h if h of his/her Np papers have at least h citations each, and the other (Np − h) paper have no more than h citations each.
  11. 11. h-index h-index tries to find a balance between productivity and citation impact Only published in 2005, has made a substantial impact in the world of bibliometrics. Applicable to authors, journals, research groups, compounds, subjects etc… But there are some serious doubts Waltman, L. & N. J. van Eck (2011). The inconsistency of the h-index. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology: n/a-n/a http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.21678
  12. 12. h-index
  13. 13. After excellent research.Where do you publish?
  14. 14. Journal selection and article impact
  15. 15. Look at the IF in a different way
  16. 16. Journal quality and article impact 2002- 2008JournalQuartile Pubs RI T10(%T10) T1(%T1) Q1 6943 2.01 1732(25%) 281(4%) Q2 3184 1.20 395 (12%) 23 (1%) Q3 1559 0.85 114 (7%) 6 (0%) Q4 640 0.58 17 (3%) 4 (1%)Aggregate 12326 1.58 2258(18%) 314(3%) Source: Wageningen Yield, Feb. 2010
  17. 17. Journal selection and impact universitiesglobally
  18. 18. Where is Wageningen?
  19. 19. Journal selection at EPS EPS Annual Report 2009. http://www.graduateschool-eps.info/
  20. 20. Journal selection and impact at EPS JIF Pubs RI St. Dev. > 10 55 8.73 8.73 5 < 10 156 4.07 3.64 2<5 444 1.93 2.08 0<2 326 1.35 3.51
  21. 21. The impact factor Matthew effectThe journal in which papers are published have astrong influence on their citation rates, as duplicatepapers published in high-impact journals obtain, onaverage, twice as many citations as their identicalcounterparts published in journals with lowerimpact factors.. Larivière, V. and Y. Gingras (2010). The impact factors Matthew Effect: A natural experiment in bibliometrics. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 61(2): 424-427. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.21232
  22. 22. Final word on journal selectionIt is better to publish one paper in a quality journal thanmultiple papers in lesser journals. [...]. Try to publish injournals that have high impact factors; chances are yourpaper will have high impact, too, if accepted. Bourne, P. E. (2005). Ten Simple Rules for Getting Published. PLoS Comput Biol 1(5): e57. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.0010057
  23. 23. Networking
  24. 24. Cooperation is effective WTI2 report 2011
  25. 25. Cooperation...Teams increasingly dominate solo authors in theproduction of knowledge. Research is increasingly donein teams across nearly all fields.Teams typically produce more frequently cited researchthan individuals do, and this advantage has beenincreasing over time.Teams now also produce the exceptionally high-impactresearch, even where that distinction was once thedomain of solo authors. Wuchty, S., B. F. Jones, et al. (2007). The increasing dominance of teams in production of knowledge. Science 316(5827): 1036-1039. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1136099
  26. 26. Networking is important!Start early, make use of social networkingtools Facebook LinkedIn Social networks for scientists  Academics.edu, Researchgate, Nature networks, Labmeeting
  27. 27. On social networking
  28. 28. On using social media Manasse (2011) The economics of blogging
  29. 29. Self citations and more
  30. 30. Self citations The model [...] implies that external citations are enhanced by self-citations, so that we have the “chain reaction:” Larger size leads to more self-citations, which lead to more external citations. van Raan, A. F. J. (2008). Self-citation as an impact-reinforcing mechanism in the science system. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 59(10): 1631-1643. 11/28
  31. 31. More on references Articles that cite more references are in turn cited more themselves Webster, G. D., P. K. Jonason, et al. (2009). Hot Topics and Popular Papers in Evolutionary Psychology: Analyses of Title Words and Citation Counts in Evolution and Human Behavior, 1979 – 2008. Evolutionary Psychology 7(3): 348-362. http://www.epjournal.net/filestore/ep07348362.pdf To be the best, cite the best Borrowed from: Corbyn, Z. (2010). "To be the best, cite the best." Nature News, 13 October 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/news.2010.539 Reporting on the publication of Bornmann, L., F. de Moya Anegón, et al. (2010). Do Scientific Advancements Lean on the Shoulders of Giants? A Bibliometric Investigation of the Ortega Hypothesis. PLoS ONE 5(10): e13327 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013327.
  32. 32. Publish your data! Henneken et al. (2011) "articles with links to data result in higher citation rates than articles without such links" http://arxiv.org/abs/1111.3618 Piwowar et al. (2007) "Sharing detailed research data is associated with increased citation rate http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0000308 Also relevant in the view of the latest developments (KNAW)
  33. 33. Open Access Publishing
  34. 34. Most theses are available as OA
  35. 35. e-Theses are the mainstay of OApublications for Wageningen UR Theses : 200 theses * 4 articles ~ 800 preprints/year Productivity Wageningen UR: 2400 peer reviewed articles / year This accounts for: 33% of the output
  36. 36. Make your publications OA available Be aware of your copyrights when publishing Golden Road  PloS Journals, BMC, etcGreen Road  Self archived copies (final author’s version)  Wageningen Yield, RePec, ArXiv etc.Open Choice  Hybrid system, author pays and library pays  Springer journals are a favourable exception
  37. 37. Other useful information - WaY http://library.wur.nl/way/ - Information for authors Publishing dissertations ● http://library.wur.nl/way/authors/dissertations.html Copyright Information (copyright transfer – license to publish) ● http://library.wur.nl/way/authors/policies.html Open Access ● http://library.wur.nl/way/authors/open_access.html
  38. 38. Is there a citation advantage for OA? Evidence is not entirely conclusive, but mounting  van Raan has started to self archive his preprints OA is important for developing countriesEvans, J.A., Reimer, J., 2009. Open access and global participation in science. Science. 323, 1025. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1154562
  39. 39. Deposit author versions to WaY See: http://edepot.wur.nl/139354
  40. 40. What’s in a name?
  41. 41. Who is the author of this thesis?
  42. 42. On the inside
  43. 43. On her own publication list
  44. 44. Notable examples: A. Voragen, A.G. Voragen,  B.M.L. van Kemenade A.G.J. Voragen,  L. van Kemenade F.G.J. Voragen,  B.M.L. Verburg van Kemenade F.G. Voragen  L. Verburg van Kemenade
  45. 45. Use maximally 2 institutional names!
  46. 46. Science groups are not of interest
  47. 47. Get your affiliation rightFor the university:Chair group + Wageningen UniversityPlant Production Systems Group, Wageningen University,P.O. box ..., 6700 HA Wageningen, The NetherlandsFor the institutes:Institute + Wageningen University & Research CentreAlterra, Wageningen University & Research Centre, P.O.box ..., 6700 HA Wageningen, The Netherlands
  48. 48. Claim your publications ResearcherID Scopus Author ID Google Scholar Citations AuthorClaimEnserink, M. (2009). Scientific Publishing: Are You Ready to Become a Number? Science,323(5922): 1662-1664 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.323.5922.1662 ORCID
  49. 49. Thank you!

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