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ETE presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Bibliometric research evaluation. The case of Sub-department Environmental Technology Wouter Gerritsma Information spcialist, Wageningen UR Library
  • 2. Contents
    • Midterm review 2005
    • Citation analysis Explained
    • Journal selection
    • What’s in a name?
  • 3. The incentive for this presentation
    • Wimek midterm evaluation 2005
  • 4. Relative impact 1.8 7 Social Sciences, General 0 1 Physics 1.27 33 Microbiology 0.17 1 Materials Science 0.15 1 Geosciences 1.01 184 Environment/Ecology 1.46 3 Engineering 0.76 12 Chemistry 0.52 84 Biology & Biochemistry 1.06 2 Agricultural Sciences RI # Papers Research area (ISI-ESI)
  • 5. Analysis over last 10 years 0 24 0.92 9.95 3244 326 All 0 11 0.83 4.67 803 172 2000-2004 0 13 1.01 15.85 24 41 154 1995-1999 Papers in top 1% Papers in top 10% RI Cits/ Pub Cits Pubs Period
  • 6. In conclusion
    • ETE very productive group
    • Average citation impact
  • 7. But what does it mean?
    • Citation data from Web of Science
    • Research Fields from Essential Science Indicators
    • Baseline data from Essential Science Indicators
  • 8. How do we compare numbers?
    • Scientist Z. Math has a publication from 1996 with 17 citations
    • Scientist M. Biology has a publication from 2003 with 24 citations
  • 9. Baseline mathematics
  • 10. Baseline Molecular Biology
  • 11. Example
    • Zee, F.P.v.d., G. Lettinga, and J.A. Field (2001) Azo dye decolourisation by anaerobic granular sludge. Chemosphere 44:1169-1176.
      • Time cited: 65 times
    • Chemosphere (look up in journals menu ESI)
      • Environment/Ecology , 7.95 citations per article
    • Baseline data (from ESI)
      • Article from 2001 in Environment/ecology: Average: 11.62 citations, 10%: 27 citations, 1%: 82 citations
    • RI= 65 / 11.62 = 5.6
  • 12. Journal selection
  • 13. Where to publish
    • It is better to publish one paper in a quality journal than multiple papers in lesser journals. …………. Try to publish in journals that have high impact factors; chances are your paper will have high impact, too, if accepted.
    Bourne PE (2005) Ten Simple Rules for Getting Published . PLoS Comput Biol 1(5): e57 doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.0010057 or at SciVee
  • 14. Journal selection
    • Quantitative tools
      • Journal citations reports
      • Journal information from Essential Science Indicators
      • ScimagoJR
  • 15. Journal Citation Reports (JCR)
    • Reports 3 measures
    • Impact factor
    • Immediacy Index
    • Cited half life
    Cited half-life 50% citations 50% citations 3 1 Immediacy index Window Impact Factor Window
  • 16.  
  • 17.  
  • 18. From ESI
    • Limitation of IF, 2 year frame
    • ESI Average citations per article over a 10 year period
  • 19.  
  • 20. Impact factor
    • Performance measure for journals
      • “… it is also used for assessment of the quality of individual papers, scientists and departments. For the latter a scientific basis is lacking, as we will demonstrate in this contribution” (Opthof, 1997)
      • Opthof, T. (1997). Sense and nonsense about the impact factor. Cardiovascular Research 33 (1): 1-7. http:// dx.doi.org /10.1016/S0008-6363(96)00215-5
  • 21. 50 % of articles generate 90% of all cites Seglen, P. O. (1997). Why the impact factor of journals should not be used for evaluating research. BMJ 314 (7079): 497-502. http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/314/7079/497
  • 22. What’s in a name Department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University , P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • 23. Dep. of Environmental Technology, Wageningen Univ. and Research Centre , Bomenweg 2, HD 6703 Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • 24.  
  • 25. Department of Agricultural, Environmental and System Technology, Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • 26. Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences, Wageningen University Agrotechnion, Mansholtlaan 10, Wageningen 6708 PA, Netherlands
  • 27. Department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, 6700 EV Wageningen, Netherlands
  • 28. Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, Netherlands
  • 29. Are these researchers the same?
    • J. van Lier or J.B. van Lier
    • P. Lens or P.N.L. Lens
    • H. Temmink or B.G. Temmink
      • Female PhD students !?
  • 30. Library course
    • Citation analysis:
      • 18 March 2008, 9.00 am-12.30 pm, room PC421
      • http://wowter.net/2007/12/12/citation-analysis-for-research-evaluation/
  • 31. Publish, be cited or perish!
  • 32. Thank you ! More info: http://wowter.net This presentation: http:// www.slideshare.net/wowter/ete -presentation