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12 Questions to ask in design
 

12 Questions to ask in design

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These slides are work in progress from my Phd studies and operationalise the Experience Design Framework (Knight and Jefsioutine, 2004) I have been working on for a number of years. ...

These slides are work in progress from my Phd studies and operationalise the Experience Design Framework (Knight and Jefsioutine, 2004) I have been working on for a number of years.

The framework aims to help designers in the early stages of ideation to explore the design space and create and evaluate potential solutions.

The sequence of questions/points is intentional with the assumption that ideation starts around question 5 – but use them in any order that works and let me know if they help or if any changes are needed at john.knight@aalto.fi

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    12 Questions to ask in design 12 Questions to ask in design Presentation Transcript

    • The design dialogue12 Questions for Design John Knight – Doctoral Student at Aalto University of Arts, Design and Architecture 2012
    • AboutThese slides are work in progress from my Phdstudies and operationalise the ExperienceDesign Framework (Knight and Jefsioutine,2004) I have been working on for a number ofyears.The framework aims to help designers in theearly stages of ideation to explore the designspace and create and evaluate potentialsolutions.John Knight – © May 2012
    • The experience design domain Products/services/artefacts
 Practice
 Engagement
 Experience
 People

    • Some definitionsPractice - “A routinized type of behaviour whichconsists of several elements, interconnected toone another: forms of bodily activities. Forms ofmental activities. ‘things’ and their use, abackground knowledge in the form ofunderstanding know-how, states of emotionand motivational knowledge.” (Reckwitz 2002,249)
    • Some definitionsEngagement - “the multidimensional (Richins,1994) quality of a product/service experienceover time (Kujala, et al, 2011) where value isemergent between the product/service and user(Morelli, 2009).” (Knight 2012)Experience – “the personal ‘in the moment’product/service interaction”
    • 12 Talking points for designers The sequence of questions is intentional– but use them in any order that works and let me know if they help or if any changes are needed at john.knight@aalto.fi 1.  What is the problem/opportunity? 2.  Are the risks known/mitigated? 3.  What is possible/impossible? 4.  What is fixed/changeable? 5.  What is the design brief? 6.  Is the future impact predictable? 7.  What are the elements of design? 8.  How is value created/consumed 9.  What happens after design? 10.  What solutions are there? 11.  Is the proposed design successful? 12.  What is the design rationale?© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 1 – Brief What is the problem/opportunity? Consider the following requirements: Why is it needed? What’s the problem/opportunity to be addressed? What must it do? What else could/should it do/not do? Should it be done at all/what’s the alternative?© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 2 – Risks Are the risks known/mitigated? Consider the following risks: Lack of business case/rationale/need Lack of audience/domain knowledge Lack of insight on competition/best practice Limited scope for improvement/design/change Limited number of alternatives available Over ambitious/cautious solutions/values Unclear scope/deliverable/requirement© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 3 – Possibilities What is possible/impossible? Consider the following possibilities: Client/audience needs/budget Project scope//resources/timescales Functional/technical/material capabilities Design roadmap/evolution/release plans Evolution/disruption/fixes/optimising potential What is in scope/out of scope? What are the hidden/obvious/ solutions?© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 4 – Boundaries What is fixed/changeable? Consider the following boundaries: Relevant social/personal practices/needs Product/service/artifact/ service provision Business model/value-chain/maintenance Product/service/artifact family/archetype Audience/actor/user needs/roles/profiles Context/scenarios of use/misuse/engagement The scope of the project/design© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 5 – Requirements What is the design brief? Are the following requirements defined: Who - audience/user/profiles What - use cases/scenarios/inputs + outputs branding/design guidelines Where - context of use Why - business/personal/social drivers© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 6 – Impact Is the future impact predictable? Consider the following: What are the business/human risks/benefits? Who + what will be affected/involved? & how? What support/resource is needed before, during and after use? What are the best/worst potential outcomes?© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 7 – Elements What are the elements of design? Consider the following: Episodes – what are the key scenarios? Artifacts – what tangibles are involved? Places – where does it happen? Agents – who are the main users/agents?© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 8 – Value How is value created/consumed? Consider the following value domains: Personal – worth to the person Social/cultural value Economic – financial worth Ethical – force for good/bad© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 9 – Lifecycle What happens after design? Consider lifecycle events including: Awareness Expectations Adoption First use Bonding Familiarity Habitual use Improvisation Attachment Detachment
    • Talking point 10 – Solutions What are the candidate solutions? Consider solutions in terms of the: Best Acceptable Easiest Innovative Safe Worst© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 11 – Success Is the proposed design successful? Consider the following quality criteria: Accessibility Usability Delight/pleasure/fun Peak+ebb/in the moment experience Fit with everyday life/practice Personal/social reward/benefit Sustainability Are there other relevant qualities?© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Talking point 12 – Checklist What is the design rationale? Consider the following checkpoints: 1.  At least three alternative solutions considered ideally from a long-list 2.  Design is evidence based and assumptions/risks known 3.  Everything extraneous has been removed 4.  Solutions meet requirements and can be measured 5.  Solution is feasible and well communicated 6.  A case is made for the solution© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • Supporting research methods Consider the following methods: 1.  Visioning workshops with stakeholders 2.  Contextual inquiry/observation in the context of use 3.  Semi-structured conceptual design workshops 4.  Co-design 5.  UAT 6.  Post implementation research – analytics etc© John Knight, Aalto University 2012
    • John.Knight@Aalto.Fi KIITOS!© John Knight, Aalto University 2012