Making Forest Landscape Restoration a force of change

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Forests once covered a much greater area than they do today. The map shows where forests could potentially grow today, based on global climate and soils data combined with WWF’s map of Terrestrial Ecoregions of the World.

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  • 1. Forests once covered a much greater area than they do today. The map shows where forests could potentially grow today, based on global climate and soils data combined with WWF’s map ofTerrestrial Ecoregions of the World. 2. Today’s forests cover just more than half of their potential extent. Large expanses of original forest have been lost—converted to produce food, timber and energy and to make space for settlement. The map shows where forests actually grow today, based on satellite images (GLC 2000). 3. The loss of forests continuesat a rapid rate. The map shows the location and extent of tropical deforestation for the years 2000–2005 according to satellite images (Hansen, et al., 2008).4.Yesterday’s loss, however, can be tomorrow’s gain. Forest landscapes can recover and climate and other benefits will grow with the trees. The map shows the world from a forest landscape restoration perspective, based on an analysis by WRI and SDSU.More than a billion hectares, spread over many continents and countries, are likely to offer restoration opportunities.AREAS WHERE FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES ARE LIKELY TO BE FOUND (more than a billion hectares)- Broad-scale restoration is possible in degraded and deforested areas that are sparsely populated and not used for agriculture. - Mosaic-type restoration is possible in degraded or deforested areas of woodlands type that are not used for crop production. Population density may be high in these areas but the land use is either not intensive or not known.AREAS WITH LOWER LIKELIHOOD OF FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES (more than a billion and a half hectares)- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where irrigated croplands dominate.- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where rainfed croplands dominate.Not all converted or degraded forests are suitable for restoration. Some of the world’s most productive agricultural lands are former forests, and significant areas that were once covered by trees have been converted to urban and industrial uses. But vast areas of marginally productive lands and pastures could grow trees once more and be part of multifunctional forest landscapes. The analysis combined existing data on forest cover, land use, and population density. The northern parts of the world (where boreal forests grow) were not included in the analysis.All maps are based on published research and presents a globally consistent picture, using the same definitions and data collection methods for the entire world.
  • 1. Forests once covered a much greater area than they do today. The map shows where forests could potentially grow today, based on global climate and soils data combined with WWF’s map ofTerrestrial Ecoregions of the World. 2. Today’s forests cover just more than half of their potential extent. Large expanses of original forest have been lost—converted to produce food, timber and energy and to make space for settlement. The map shows where forests actually grow today, based on satellite images (GLC 2000). 3. The loss of forests continuesat a rapid rate. The map shows the location and extent of tropical deforestation for the years 2000–2005 according to satellite images (Hansen, et al., 2008).4.Yesterday’s loss, however, can be tomorrow’s gain. Forest landscapes can recover and climate and other benefits will grow with the trees. The map shows the world from a forest landscape restoration perspective, based on an analysis by WRI and SDSU.More than a billion hectares, spread over many continents and countries, are likely to offer restoration opportunities.AREAS WHERE FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES ARE LIKELY TO BE FOUND (more than a billion hectares)- Broad-scale restoration is possible in degraded and deforested areas that are sparsely populated and not used for agriculture. - Mosaic-type restoration is possible in degraded or deforested areas of woodlands type that are not used for crop production. Population density may be high in these areas but the land use is either not intensive or not known.AREAS WITH LOWER LIKELIHOOD OF FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES (more than a billion and a half hectares)- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where irrigated croplands dominate.- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where rainfed croplands dominate.Not all converted or degraded forests are suitable for restoration. Some of the world’s most productive agricultural lands are former forests, and significant areas that were once covered by trees have been converted to urban and industrial uses. But vast areas of marginally productive lands and pastures could grow trees once more and be part of multifunctional forest landscapes. The analysis combined existing data on forest cover, land use, and population density. The northern parts of the world (where boreal forests grow) were not included in the analysis.All maps are based on published research and presents a globally consistent picture, using the same definitions and data collection methods for the entire world.
  • 1. Forests once covered a much greater area than they do today. The map shows where forests could potentially grow today, based on global climate and soils data combined with WWF’s map ofTerrestrial Ecoregions of the World. 2. Today’s forests cover just more than half of their potential extent. Large expanses of original forest have been lost—converted to produce food, timber and energy and to make space for settlement. The map shows where forests actually grow today, based on satellite images (GLC 2000). 3. The loss of forests continuesat a rapid rate. The map shows the location and extent of tropical deforestation for the years 2000–2005 according to satellite images (Hansen, et al., 2008).4.Yesterday’s loss, however, can be tomorrow’s gain. Forest landscapes can recover and climate and other benefits will grow with the trees. The map shows the world from a forest landscape restoration perspective, based on an analysis by WRI and SDSU.More than a billion hectares, spread over many continents and countries, are likely to offer restoration opportunities.AREAS WHERE FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES ARE LIKELY TO BE FOUND (more than a billion hectares)- Broad-scale restoration is possible in degraded and deforested areas that are sparsely populated and not used for agriculture. - Mosaic-type restoration is possible in degraded or deforested areas of woodlands type that are not used for crop production. Population density may be high in these areas but the land use is either not intensive or not known.AREAS WITH LOWER LIKELIHOOD OF FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES (more than a billion and a half hectares)- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where irrigated croplands dominate.- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where rainfed croplands dominate.Not all converted or degraded forests are suitable for restoration. Some of the world’s most productive agricultural lands are former forests, and significant areas that were once covered by trees have been converted to urban and industrial uses. But vast areas of marginally productive lands and pastures could grow trees once more and be part of multifunctional forest landscapes. The analysis combined existing data on forest cover, land use, and population density. The northern parts of the world (where boreal forests grow) were not included in the analysis.All maps are based on published research and presents a globally consistent picture, using the same definitions and data collection methods for the entire world.
  • 1. Forests once covered a much greater area than they do today. The map shows where forests could potentially grow today, based on global climate and soils data combined with WWF’s map ofTerrestrial Ecoregions of the World. 2. Today’s forests cover just more than half of their potential extent. Large expanses of original forest have been lost—converted to produce food, timber and energy and to make space for settlement. The map shows where forests actually grow today, based on satellite images (GLC 2000). 3. The loss of forests continuesat a rapid rate. The map shows the location and extent of tropical deforestation for the years 2000–2005 according to satellite images (Hansen, et al., 2008).4.Yesterday’s loss, however, can be tomorrow’s gain. Forest landscapes can recover and climate and other benefits will grow with the trees. The map shows the world from a forest landscape restoration perspective, based on an analysis by WRI and SDSU.More than a billion hectares, spread over many continents and countries, are likely to offer restoration opportunities.AREAS WHERE FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES ARE LIKELY TO BE FOUND (more than a billion hectares)- Broad-scale restoration is possible in degraded and deforested areas that are sparsely populated and not used for agriculture. - Mosaic-type restoration is possible in degraded or deforested areas of woodlands type that are not used for crop production. Population density may be high in these areas but the land use is either not intensive or not known.AREAS WITH LOWER LIKELIHOOD OF FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES (more than a billion and a half hectares)- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where irrigated croplands dominate.- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where rainfed croplands dominate.Not all converted or degraded forests are suitable for restoration. Some of the world’s most productive agricultural lands are former forests, and significant areas that were once covered by trees have been converted to urban and industrial uses. But vast areas of marginally productive lands and pastures could grow trees once more and be part of multifunctional forest landscapes. The analysis combined existing data on forest cover, land use, and population density. The northern parts of the world (where boreal forests grow) were not included in the analysis.All maps are based on published research and presents a globally consistent picture, using the same definitions and data collection methods for the entire world.
  • Making Forest Landscape Restoration a force of change

    1. A World of Opportunity<br />Original forest<br />Forests once covered a much greater area than they do today. The map shows where forests could potentially grow today, based on global climate and soils data combined with WWF’s map of Terrestrial Ecoregions of the World. <br />
    2. A World of Opportunity<br />Current forest<br />Today’s forests cover just more than half of their potential extent. Large expanses of original forest have been lost—converted to produce food, timber and energy and to make space for settlement. <br />
    3. A World of Opportunity<br />Current forest<br />The loss of forests continues at a rapid rate. The map shows the location and extent of tropical deforestation for the years 2000–2005 according to satellite images (Hansen, et al., 2008).<br />Tropical deforestation 2000-2005<br />
    4. A World of Opportunity<br />Yesterday’s loss, however, can be tomorrow’s gain. Forest landscapes can recover and climate and other benefits will grow with the trees. The map shows the world from a forest landscape restoration perspective, based on an analysis by WRI and SDSU.<br />Tropical deforestation 2000-2005<br />Irrigated croplands<br />Rainfed croplands<br />Broad-scale restoration<br />Mosaic restoration<br />
    5. Forest landscape restoration potential(million hectares, excluding the boreal)<br />More than a billion hectares, spread over many continents and countries, are likely to offer restoration opportunities.<br />AREAS WHERE FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES ARE LIKELY TO BE FOUND (more than a billion hectares)<br />- Broad-scale restoration is possible in degraded and deforested areas that are sparsely populated and not used for agriculture. <br />- Mosaic-type restoration is possible in degraded or deforested areas of woodlands type that are not used for crop production. Population density may be high in these areas but the land use is either not intensive or not known.<br />AREAS WITH LOWER LIKELIHOOD OF FOREST LANDSCAPE RESTORATION OPPORTUNITIES (more than a billion and a half hectares)<br />- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where irrigated croplands dominate.<br />- Mosaic-type restoration may be possible in some deforested landscapes where rainfed croplands dominate.<br />

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