Building a Leading Edge Workforce . . . Together: 2012 Local Labour Market Plan for Grand Erie

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A labour market plan for the Grand Erie region of Ontario -- Brantford, Brant, Haldimand, Norfolk, Six Nations and New Credit -- from the Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie. Outlines strategies and actions for the 2012-2013 year.

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Building a Leading Edge Workforce . . . Together: 2012 Local Labour Market Plan for Grand Erie

  1. 1. Building a Leading Edge Workforce... Together 2012 Local Labour Market Plan 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg I
  2. 2. OUR VISION A skilled, adaptable workforce contributing to a vibrant economy This Employment Ontario Project is funded by the Government of Ontario The views expressed in this document do not necessarily reflect those of Employment Ontario.The material in this report has been prepared by WPBGE and is drawn from a variety of sources considered to be reliable. We make no representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to its accuracy or completeness. In providing this material, WPBGE does not assume any responsibility or liability.
  3. 3. Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................................................................. 1 Building a Leading Edge Workforce................................................................................................................... 3 The Consultation Process......................................................................................................................... 3 Moving Forward.......................................................................................................................................... 4 Strategies and Recommendations for Action................................................................................................ 5 Collaboration................................................................................................................................................ 6 Innovation..................................................................................................................................................... 7 Workforce Development.......................................................................................................................... 8 Youth Engagement.................................................................................................................................... 9 Grand Erie Labour Market..................................................................................................................................... 10 Population..................................................................................................................................................... 11 Grand Erie Labour Force........................................................................................................................... 11 Supporting Populations Under-Represented in our Labour Force.................................................................................................................................... 12 Six Nations of the Grand River and Mississaugas of the New Credit............................................................................................................................ 12 Immigrant.......................................................................................................................................... 12 Populations at Risk..................................................................................................................................... 13 Low German Speaking Mennonites........................................................................................ 13 Sector Analysis.......................................................................................................................................................... 14 Agriculture.................................................................................................................................................... 14 Construction................................................................................................................................................. 16 Manufacturing Sector............................................................................................................................... 17 Food Manufacturing...................................................................................................................... 18 Chemical Manufacturing............................................................................................................. 19 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing...................................................................... 20 Fabricated Metal Manufacturing.............................................................................................. 21 Machinery Manufacturing........................................................................................................... 22 Tourism........................................................................................................................................................... 23 Service Producing Sectors....................................................................................................................... 26 Utilities............................................................................................................................................................ 27 Get Involved ............................................................................................................................................................... 28 References ............................................................................................................................................................... 29 Consultation Participants...................................................................................................................................... 30 Definitions ............................................................................................................................................................... 31
  4. 4. Executive Summary The Grand Erie economy experienced both challenges and opportunities throughout 2011. The population growth in Brantford-Brant outpaced the province, reflecting increases in the number of new residents of working age between 2005 and 2010. Norfolk also experienced population growth, but migration figures for the Haldimand-Norfolk census division show that most of that growth was concentrated in the older ages and that the county experienced significant loss of younger workers aged 18-44. Population figures for Haldimand County shrank, possibly due to lost manufacturing and ongoing claims issues. These losses are reason for concern as they may result in labour shortages in the years to come. The labour force also experienced losses. The annual Labour Force Survey produced by Statistics Canada revealed a shrinking number of people in the labour force and in employment. Brant (CD) and Haldimand-Norfolk (CD), combined, lost a total of 1600 jobs. We learned that many of our unemployed lack the necessary education and skills for emerging occupations and sectors. More than half of all job seekers working with Employment Ontario have grade twelve or less and will likely need to access some form of post-secondary training or upgrading to make a successful transition into new employment. Within every sector, including manufacturing, there were positive opportunities. Agriculture, one of our largest sources of businesses and jobs, grew for the first time since 2008. Many new opportunities are arising as the sector expands into new ventures such as wineries, agri-tourism, pharmaceuticals, and new product development. Tourism also continues to grow, generating considerable revenue for local businesses and communities. Occupations in this sector provide excellent opportunities for youth employment and a wide range of professional occupations. Construction continued to contribute many jobs within the region, particularly in the sector of specialty trade contractors. This contributes to one of Grand Erie’s greatest competitive advantages – a higher proportion of apprentices and skilled workers than Ontario as a whole. Recent declines in the number of skilled workers are concerning however, and suggest that we need to take action to ensure that new apprentices are being trained to replace retiring workers. We continued to experience a downward trend in manufacturing, losing another 53 businesses in Brant and 23 in Haldimand-Norfolk. The loss of these businesses contributed to the disappearance of more than 1,100 jobs since 2008. Good news was also apparent – Brant reported 22 new businesses in 2011, adding several hundred jobs, and more than a thousand workers returned to work in Haldimand-Norfolk at the U. S. Steel Nanticoke plant. Many factors outside our control have contributed to the loss of businesses and jobs within our communities. Renewing the vibrancy of our labour market requires a positive, collaborative, no-blame, forward thinking approach. Grand Erie is a region rich in leadership, resources, and ideas. In order to harness these resources and ideas, Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie invited community leaders from business, government, education, and service to share their vision for a Leading Edge Workforce. During sessions in Brant, Haldimand-Norfolk and Six Nations, people from each community were asked to answer the following questions: • What does a leading edge workforce look like? • What is needed to power change? • What does our community have going for it?pg 1
  5. 5. • How can we, as a community, utilize our resources, capacity and strengths to create sustainable employment opportunities for a leading edge workforce?What they determined is that our communities have tremendous potential to become economic leaders in the provinceof Ontario by acting on five core recommendations:• Develop collaborative partnerships with key stakeholders to strengthen future growth and prosperity• Foster innovation through creative idea generation• Develop a workforce that is well balanced with a positive attitude towards self, education, employment, workplace, and workmanship• Develop inter-generational dialogue and youth engagement strategies that will foster youth retention• Increased community awareness of the programs and service in place to support employment and trainingAs you read this report, you will learn more about the actions proposed for the coming year. Additional information abouteach consultation can be found by visiting What’s New at www.workforceplanningboard.orgWe invite you to share this report with others in your organization and community and to get involved in putting theseactions into motion.SincerelyJill HalykExecutive Director 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 2
  6. 6. Building a Leading Edge Workforce Grand Erie’s economy is changing. We are moving from the days when manufacturing provided thousands of good paying jobs and tobacco farms dotted the sand plains, to an economy reinventing itself. Grand Erie has the potential to become economic leaders in Ontario’s economy. We are centrally located on the 400 corridor providing excellent access to the U.S. border; we are home to the fifth largest agricultural sector in Ontario; we are home to a unique environment including the Grand River, Lake Erie, and the Carolinian forest; and we are home to Canada’s largest First Nations’ community. During the past five years Grand Erie’s labour market plan has focused on the industries experiencing labour market adjustment due to growth or decline. This year, because industry trends showed little change, we decided instead to focus on what we can do to develop the leading edge workforce needed for success in a new economy. The Consultation Process Community leaders from Brant, Haldimand-Norfolk, Six Nations of the Grand River, New Credit and the directors of the Workforce Planning Board took part in four separate consultation sessions. Each group was asked to focus on the following questions: ► What does a leading edge workforce look like? ► What is needed to power that change? ► What does our community have going for it? ► How can we, as a community, utilize our resources, capacity and strengths to create sustainable employment opportunities for a leading edge workforce? Brantford-Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Six Nations of the Grand River • Innovative • Positive work values • Flexible • Positive attitude • Ambitious • Collaborative • Educated • Creative • Trend setters • Responsive to change A Leading • Adaptable • Strong foundational skills • • Adaptable Self-worth Edge • • Value for wages Relevant skills for jobs • • Creative Innovative • • Multi-skilled Pride in jobs Workforce • Strong skills: finance, math, • Adaptable • Accountable is... • thinking skills Globally competitive • • Mobile Strong literacy and basic skills • • Positive attitude Educated • Diverse • Young and talented • Commitment • Strong basic skills • Life long learning • Reliable • Creative • Continous learning • Risk takers • Diversity • Cross trained • Respect • Leadership • Initiative • Open minded • Open communicationspg 3
  7. 7. Following a comprehensive analysis of the data collected through the consultation process, five key themes emerged includingcollaboration, innovation, skills development, youth engagement and awareness/marketing. The following table presents thethemes by community. THEME Workforce Youth Awareness/Community Collaboration Innovation Development Engagement MarketingHaldimand- Collaboration Innovation Youth EngagementNorfolk Partnerships Awareness and marketing of Proactive existing resources Development and assets needsBrant- of skills/ Collaboration to increaseBrantford knowledge of both within current/future the community labour force and to external investors Workforce Communication needs well and awareness balanced and of resourcesSix Nations positive attitude and programs Employerof the Grand towards self, available for EngagementRiver education, businesses/ employment, employers, job workplace and seekers and the workmanship communityEmployer engagement is folded under the umbrella of collaboration as the two themes rely on each other. As key stakeholdersin the local labour market, employers create local jobs and their support of initiatives like co-op placements, internships, skillsdevelopment and school-to work- transition is critical. The practice of engagement is at the centre of collaboration. When thetwo are aligned, there is greater opportunity for innovation, another key priority identified through the consultation process.Moving ForwardOur communities have the desire and the capacity to build a leading edge workforce. With the leadership and support ofcommunity members we will engage workers, employers, educators, service organizations and local government in workthat promotes a culture of change and resilience. Our actions will focus on collaboration, innovation, workforce developmentand youth engagement. Full details of the consultation findings and actions can be viewed in What’s New at www.workforceplanningboard.org. 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 4
  8. 8. Strategies and Recommendations for Actionpg 5
  9. 9. Strategies and Recommendations for ActionCollaborationGOAL: Develop Collaborative partnerships with key stakeholders to strength future growthand prosperity.Required Actions Potential Partners WPBGE TimingDevelop a centralized labour marketinformation network to engaged Municipalities, NGOs and Lead. Coordinator ofstakeholders across the region and Long-term agencies activity, host of hubto support information sharing andgathering.Provide face-to-face or web-basedopportunities to promote learning that Municipalities, NGOs and Lead, Coordinator ofstrengthens collaborative approaches Short-term agencies activityand networking to foster greatercollaboration.Consciously identify key players inthe community and ensure that they Municipalities, NGOsare invited to participate around the and agencies, educators, Partner Short-termappropriate tables and involved in the unions, employersdecision-making process.Create a channel, through such tools asweb-site, blog or other social media tools, Municipalities, NGOs.to conduct outreach to local business Agencies, local business Lead Short-termand industry leaders to understand their championsneeds and vision for the community.Implement a change managementprocess that blends the two cultures of Municipalities, NGOs,workforce development and economic economic development Partner Long-termdevelopment operations. (Phoenix and agenciesNew York might provide models).Performance Measures:• Number of users/amount of traffic generated through use of blogs/social media• Development of workshop series and attendance to workshops• Increased representation of key stakeholder groups on important committees and boards throughout the region• Number of business visits or communications between the Workforce Planning Board and specific local businesses 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 6
  10. 10. Strategies and Recommendations for Action Innovation GOAL: Foster Innovation through creative idea generation Required Actions Potential Partners WPBGE Timing Celebrate and promote innovative approaches utilized in the community Municipalities, NGOs and Lead, host of award through an innovative awards initiative Short-term agencies, Media gala that increases local awareness of activities and their impact on the community. Partner, facilitate Promote innovative thinking through Municipalities, mentoring program a mentoring program that links young NGOs, agencies, in conjunction Medium-term professionals and business leaders/ local businesses and with business innovators in the area. champions organizations Develop workshops that support skills development and new knowledge related Lead, coordinate to innovation to assist local entrepreneurs Agencies in the area Medium-term activity and innovators to mitigate risks in the present and future. Develop an information resource that Provincial, national showcases best practices in innovative and international Lead Short-term thinking with a focus on local community workforce development impact. organizations Engage agencies that support business recruitment and expansion Municipalities, NGOs, to aggressively use local workforce economic development Partner Short-term development system to support sector agencies in the area growth in Grand Erie. Performance Measures: • Number of innovation awards presented year over year • Number of participants involved in the mentoring program • Attendance at workshop • Number of requests for the resource developed to showcase best practicespg 7
  11. 11. Strategies and Recommendations for ActionWorkforce DevelopmentGOAL: Workforce is well balanced with a positive attitude towards self, education,employment, workplace and workmanship.Required Actions Potential Partners WPBGE Timing Municipalities, schoolInitiate a “Skills/Occupational Inventory” boards, post-secondaryof our local workforce to profile our institutions, Employmentexisting strengths and to identify Lead Short-term Ontario agencies, socialemerging training and educational services, local businessesrequirements. and championsGenerate a “Workforce DevelopmentCharter” to promote the stated goal in Municipalities, schoolan effort to maximize use of common boards, post-secondary Lead, helplanguage among key stakeholders when institutions, agencies, coordinate Short-termpromoting workforce development and local businesses and communicationsto guide community strategies towards championsachieving this goal.Ensure that workers interested inretraining and skills development areaware of the programming available. School boards,Information campaigns, information post-secondarysharing with key service providers and institutions, agencies, Partner Short-termlocal media advertising and/or coverage local businesses andare avenues that could potentially championsincrease the knowledge of workers in thearea.Performance Measures:• Number of participants in local information session• Number of stakeholders that buy into the concept of a Workforce Charter• Percentage of increase or decrease in the number of workers who take part in particular services and/or programs highlighted in media campaigns 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 8
  12. 12. Strategies and Recommendations for Action Youth Engagement GOAL: Develop inter-generational dialogue and youth engagement strategies that will foster youth retention. Required Actions Potential Partners WPBGE Timing Strengthen understanding among community and business leaders about the importance of engaging with youth and allowing them to take part in Municipalities Co-lead awareness Short-term decision-making processes. Allow youth Employment Ontario raising to sit around the table on key committees and organizations throughout the community. Empower youth to take an active role in identifying strategies and priorities Municipalities, school related to community and economic boards, post-secondary development. Focus groups or a youth institutions, agencies, Partner Medium-term forum could be held to garner their local businesses and opinions and to empower them to champions influence strategies that impact their lives and their community. Host or expand career fairs that showcase Municipalities, school vocational opportunities throughout boards, post-secondary Grand Erie to students in high schools and institutions, agencies, Partner Medium-term post-secondary institutions throughout local businesses and the area. champions Recruit youth ambassadors to participate Municipalities, school in an advisory to the Workforce Planning boards, post-secondary Board of Grand Erie to ensure that issues institutions, agencies, Lead Short-term important to Grand Eries youth are fairly local businesses and represented. champions Performance Measures: • Number of youth engaged in a variety of community committees and boards and with the Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie • The number of youth focus groups to gauge youth opinionspg 9
  13. 13. Grand Erie Labour MarketThe Grand Erie region is made up of the census divisions of Brant and Haldimand-Norfolk. A description of each census division isprovided below.The Brant census division consists of two single tiered municipalities - the County of Brant and the City of Brantford. The county isrural in nature and includes the communities of Burford, Oakland, Glen Morris, Mount Pleasant, Onondaga, Paris, Scotland and St.George. The City of Brantford, recently identified as a census metropolitan area (CMA), sits within the county.Haldimand-Norfolk is also made up of two single tiered municipalities. Haldimand County has the smallest population withinthe region and includes the urban communities of Caledonia, Cayuga, Dunnville, Hagersville, Jarvis/Townsend and Selkirk. Asmall part of Six Nations Reserve is also in Haldimand County, but not within its jurisdiction. Norfolk County is the larger of thetwo municipalities and is located along the north shores of Lake Erie. The largest urban centres in this rural municipality includeSimcoe, Delhi, Port Dover and Waterford.Grand Erie City of Brantford Brant County of Brant Census 2006 - 125,099 Norfolk County Census 2011 - 136,038 % Change - 8.7% Haldimand County Haldimand-Norfolk Census 2006 - 107,812 Census 2011 - 109,118 % Change - 1.2%Source: Statistics Canada, 2011 Census 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 10
  14. 14. Population Population growth in Brant exceeded the provincial average by 3%. The city and the county experienced similar levels of growth, increasing by 3.6% in the county (Census Sub Division-CSD) and 3.8 in the city (CSD). Haldimand-Norfolk differed. Norfolk experienced growth of 1.0% (CSD) while Haldimand declined by -0.7% (CSD) Changes in local population figures may have considerable impact on workforce adjustment strategies. The declining population in Haldimand may reflect the loss of people in the core working age ( ages 18-44) due to closures such as Bick’s Pickles (Smuckers). In contrast, the increased population in Norfolk may reflect a growing retirement community – creating increased demands for elder-care services, at the same time that a dwindling youth population is forcing school closures.1 The impact in Brant is likely more positive – new residential development and an affordable cost of living are attracting people in the core working age. Evidence of these trends shows in migration data produced by Statistics Canada. Between 2005 and 2010, Haldimand- Norfolk population of youth ( 18 – 24) declined by 2,007, while the older population (45 years and older) grew by 1,203. Migration Characteristics 2005-2010 In-migrants Out-migrants Net-Migrants Age Group Haldimand- Haldimand- Haldimand- Brant Brant Brant Norfolk Norfolk Norfolk 0-17 5,209 6,302 4,906 5,145 303 1,157 18-24 2,551 3,410 4,558 3,750 -2,007 -340 25-44 7,228 9,999 7,280 8,613 -52 1,386 45-64 4,546 4,452 3,570 4,014 976 438 65+ 1,882 1,858 1,655 1,604 227 254 Total 21,416 26,021 21,969 23,126 -553 2,895 Source: Statistics Canada, Taxfiler Brant, in contrast, gained 1,824 people in the prime working age groups of 25 -44 and 45– 64 replacing the loss of 340 youth aged 18-24. Brant’s in-migration may reflect students returning to the Brantford area upon completion of their studies. Grand Erie Labour Force Annual labour force figures for the Brantford CMA region show that employment fell from 68,600 in 2007 to 68,200 in 20112 resulting in 400 fewer people working. Continued declines are evident in month over month figures released by BrantJobs which show January 2012 employment at 65,000. These employment losses, coupled with a declining labour force and participation rate suggest that a fairly large number of people have stopped looking for work. Participation rates for the Brantford CMA fell by -4.5% between January 2011 and January 2012, meaning that 4,300 people were no longer looking for work. Similar trends are occurring in the Norfolk census subdivision. Year-over-year figures from December 2008 to December 2011 show a shrinking labour force (-2300) and the loss of 1,300 jobs. Discussions with social service agencies and Employment Ontario suggest that many of the people who have lost their jobs lack the skills for emerging occupations. In the period of November 2010 to November 2011, the number of people receiving social assistance in Haldimand-Norfolk fell by only 9 cases and in Brantford-Brant numbers climbed from 2,259 in January 2011 to 2,427 in January 2012.pg 11
  15. 15. Supporting Populations Under-Representedin Our Labour ForceSo who are our unemployed? Information obtained from Employment Ontario service agencies show that more than 50% of thepeople receiving their help have grade 12 or less. Approximately 37% are over 45 years of age, followed by those in their 30’s and40’s. Youth under the age of 30 represent approximately 27%.Labour force planning must respond to both present and future conditions. Current economic conditions create an over-supplyof workers, but as the aging population retires, some areas of Grand Erie can expect a shortage of workers. We need to preparecurrent and future workers to meet the demand.Six Nations of the Grand River and Mississaugas of the New CreditThe 26,000 (estimated) members of the Six Nations of the Grand River and the Mississaugas of the New Credit are an importantpart of Grand Erie’s labour market and this young population is expected to be the area’s largest source of employment growth inthe years to come.Current information collected through the Six Nations/Haudenosauness Labour Force Survey conducted in January 2009 showsthat aboriginal workers are under-represented in the region’s primary sectors. Six Nation’s labour force is heavily concentrated inthe public administration industry instead of the region’s major employment sectors such as manufacturing and food services,and accommodation.The communities of Six Nations and New Credit are working to improve labour market outcomes for their area. Local agenciessuch as Grand River Employment and Training are working in partnership with Mohawk College and the Grand Erie District SchoolBoard to provide dual credit and turning point programs for students. The Ogwehoweh Skills and Trades Training Centre, inpartnership with trade unions and local colleges provide skilled trades training (open to everyone). Partnerships with the Countyof Brant and City of Brantford are building tourism related opportunities and programs for aboriginal people are also beingoffered off-reserve through the Technical Trades Academy and the Joint Apprenticeship Training Centre.ImmigrantApproximately 300 immigrants arrive in Grand Erie each year, with the majority choosing the urban area of Brantford-Brant.Immigrants represent about 12% of the total population and this figure has remained consistent over the last fifteen years. Duringthe period of 2007 and 2010, 1,240 immigrants arrived in Grand Erie with the majority settling in Brantford-Brant (865), followedby Norfolk (290) and Haldimand (85). 78% of recent arrivals are workers aged 15-64 or youth under the age of 15 (17%).Although new arrivals to the area have generally higher levels of education than the general population most struggle to findwork in the local labour market. This prevents full integration into the local community and creates hardships for families.In 2011, the Grand Erie Immigration Partnership, led by the Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie in partnership with allfour municipalities and YMCA Immigrant Settlement Services completed a detailed profile3 of newcomers in Grand Erie. Thisinformation will be used to develop a newcomer employment strategy during 2012. 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 12
  16. 16. Populations at High Risk Low-German Speaking Mennonites Research conducted as part of our Grand Erie Immigration Partnership shows that approximately 10,000 Mennonites live in Haldimand and Norfolk counties. Low-German speaking Mennonites work primarily in the agriculture sector; some migrate back and forth between Canada and Mexico or South America. In the past these families have lived and worked on local farms. This work is declining as farmers depend more on off-shore workers to pick the harvest. The Mennonite way of life is unique – the way they dress, their approach to education/technology, their colony lifestyle, and their religious practices – each impacting their ability to live and work in Canada. Labour force strategies that focus on English language training and literacy are needed to assist workers develop the skills for work in other sectors.pg 13
  17. 17. Sector AnalysisAgricultureFarming and related agriculture businesses have a long and rich history in the economies of Brant and Haldimand-Norfolk. Cropand animal production lead the economy in both the number of enterprises and the number of jobs they provide. 1,327 smalland medium sized (SMEs) crop operations exist in the region, ranking as the top sector of employment in Haldimand-Norfolk(4,822 jobs) and the fourth largest in Brant (1,019 jobs). Animal production represents fewer businesses at a total of 692 SMEs,ranking as the fifth largest source of jobs in Haldimand-Norfolk (1,032 jobs) and 34th in Brant (340 jobs). In addition to these SMEs,Haldimand-Norfolk is home to eight large enterprises of which six employ between 100 and 199 employees and two employbetween 200 and 499. Brant has only one large enterprise employing between 100 and 199 employees. Change in Number of Businesses 2008 - 2011 Absolute Percent Change Change (%) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2008-2011 2008-2011 Crop Production Brant 270 267 267 308 38 14.07 Haldimand-Norfolk 928 930 948 1019 20 9.81 TOTAL 1198 1197 1215 1327 58 Animal Production Brant 174 180 157 184 10 5.75 Haldimand-Norfolk 497 501 514 508 11 2.21 TOTAL 671 681 671 692 21Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011 Change in Employment (SMEs) 2008 - 2011 Absolute Percent Change Change (%) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2008-2011 2008-2011 Crop Production Brant 1484 1292 1268 1419 -65 -4.38 Haldimand-Norfolk 5172 4890 4801 4822 -350 -6.77 TOTAL 6656 6182 6069 6241 -415 Animal Production Brant 327 333 293 340 13 3.91 Haldimand-Norfolk 1005 1030 1028 1032 26 2.62 TOTAL 1332 1363 1321 1372 39Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 14
  18. 18. 2011 brought positive news about the agriculture sector – for the first time since 2008, the number of crop producers rose by 58 businesses, breaking a downward trend. Animal producers gained 21 businesses. Job growth is recovering more slowly but also showed improvement in 2011, bringing figures more in line with pre-recession employment. Recognizing the importance of agriculture to Grand Erie’s labour force, the Workforce Planning Board undertook a full study of each county in 20114 to gain an understanding of the opportunities and challenges facing agri-businesses. The findings suggest that the area is well positioned to take a more active role in bio-mass and bio-fuel production (energy); to expand production of exotic fruits and vegetables to meet the demand of a growing immigrant population; to take advantage of the “eat local” movement; and to expand production of crops used for medicines and healthy living. There are labour market challenges that must be addressed to meet these objectives. The sector is faced with an aging workforce averaging 52.6 years of age across the province. Local farm operators exceed or match this age in Grand Erie. Young people are not entering the field – in fact the rate of new entrants aged 35 and under fell from 9% in 2006 to 6.5% in 2011. Through our research and through the 2009 Dialogue Forum, hosted by the Minister of State Agriculture, youth identified serious financial challenges in entering the sector. These included a lack of start-up capital, uncertain income streams, low commodity prices, declining shares for farm producers, and labour costs all in addition to high levels of student debt. Youth also identified that little information was available to help them choose a career path in the sector or to gain additional skills through continuing education and skills training. Clearly new entrants are needed in agriculture if the sector is to successfully transition into the emerging energy, environmental, pharmaceutical, and global markets. Working collaboratively, we can take steps to move these initiatives forward in partnership with our county agriculture advisory boards and federations of agriculture. Industry Recommendations ► Career information and promotion to improve the image of the sector ► Skills training programs focused on attracting young people ► Alternative training options including apprenticeship and mentorship ► Higher levels of education locally to support farm operators transition into alternative crops (green, technology, new crop development, pharmaceuticals) ► Advanced training related to business management, environmental and legislative requirementspg 15
  19. 19. ConstructionThe construction sector is an important part of Grand Erie’s economy and labour force. The construction sector is made upof three sub-sectors including construction of buildings (NAIC236), heavy and civil engineering constructions (NAIC237), andspecialty trade contractors (NAIC238). Number of Businesses NAIC Description BRANT 2008 BRANT 2011 H-N 2008 H-N 2011 236 Construction of Buildings 258 279 243 239 237 Heavy and Civil Engineering 95 87 67 61 Construction 238 Specialty Trade Contractors 550 554 575 554Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns Data, June 2011Specialty trade contractors employ more than 3,775 workers in Grand Erie, making this sector the second large source ofemployment in Haldimand-Norfolk and the third largest in Brant. Number of Jobs NAIC Description BRANT 2008 BRANT 2011 H-N 2008 H-N 2011 236 Construction of Buildings 666 707 589 589 237 Heavy and Civil Engineering 451 389 170 153 Construction 238 Specialty Trade Contractors 2276 2190 1694 1585Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns Data, June 2011The loss of specialty trade contractors is well documented in numerous studies and specialattention should be given to ensuring an adequate number of apprentices are in training toreplace an aging workforce.5 One of the major concerns within Grand Erie relates to the ratioof journey-persons to apprentices. On February 15th, the newly formed College of Tradesannounced that an Apprenticeship Ratio Review will be conducted. More information canbe found at http://www.collegeoftrades.ca/. 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 16
  20. 20. Manufacturing Sector An Overview Locally, Grand Erie continues to experience the downward trend affecting manufacturing across Ontario and Canada. The manufacturing boom of a decade ago has been replaced by the steady decline of firms in almost every segment of manufacturing. Between 2003 and 2008 manufacturing businesses6 declined from 802 to 764. In the period between December 2008 and June 2011, 53 small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) disappeared in Brant and 23 in Haldimand-Norfolk. The largest drop occurred in 2009 and 2010 as local manufacturing firms dealt with a world-wide financial crisis, off-shore competition, competitive wages, and a “bring it back” American campaign. Continued instability continues in 2011. Figures provided for SME’s show modest year-over-year gains in Brant, where the number of manufacturing firms increased from 380 in 2010 to 389 in 2011. Haldimand-Norfolk manufacturing experienced the additional loss of 42 businesses. Large manufacturing firms showed similar instability. The gain of seven large firms in Brant’s food, chemical, plastics, electrical equipment and furniture manufacturing sectors was offset by the loss of three large firms in the food, beverage and tobacco sector, and non-metallic mineral product manufacturing. Haldimand-Norfolk also lost two large firms in the non-metallic mineral product manufacturing segment, reducing their overall number of large employers to nine. The impact on jobs has been severe. Manufacturing employment in Brant fell by 1,232 jobs since 2008, with the greatest losses occurring in 2009 and 2010. In contrast, in spite of losing businesses, Haldimand-Norfolk experienced employment growth, adding 122 jobs. There is some good news. Twenty-two new industrial businesses opened in Brant creating 349 new jobs. All of these firms are small-medium sized enterprises employing 50 employees or less emphasizing the importance of small business to the economy. More growth is expected in 2012 with the addition of 70-80 jobs when Massilly North America opens operations in the former Raymond Industries site. In Haldimand, the end of a major labour dispute resulted in 1,350 workers returning to work at U. S. Steel, Lake Erie Works. The company is now investing in environmental processes resulting in a modernized facility for the future. The following section provides an update on major manufacturing subsectors, the implications for manufacturing workers, and potential labour market strategies. Manufacturing Industry Sub-sectors A brief overview of the top five manufacturing sectors highlights business and employment trends in the following sectors: ► NAIC 311 Food Manufacturing ► NAIC 325 Chemical Manufacturing ► NAIC 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing ► NAIC 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing ► NAIC 333 Machinery Manufacturingpg 17
  21. 21. NAIC 311 Food ManufacturingThe food manufacturing industry forms an important cluster across Grand Erie, representing a total of 30 businesses in Brant and43 businesses in Haldimand-Norfolk. Eight of these businesses employ 100 or more employees, with the largest firm employingmore than 500 people.Food manufacturing remained quite stable between 2008 and 2011, with the most notable difference being the addition of twocompanies employing 100-199 employees and one company employing 200-499. NAIC 311 NAIC 311 Food Manufacturing Businesses Food Manufacturing Jobs50 Dec 2008 - June 2011 500 Dec 2008 - June 201140 40030 30020 200 2008 2009 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Brant Haldimand-NorfolkSource: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011 Source: Derived from Statistics Canada data. 2011Employment in the food manufacturing sector includes a mix of full time, seasonal, and contract employees and involvesoccupations ranging from highly skilled technologists to labourers. Statistics for small and medium sized enterprises (0 – 99employees) show a decline of 99 jobs in Brant since 2008, with the most significant change taking place in companies employing50-99 people. However, this decline is likely the result of two companies expanding into the 100 – 199 employee size range.Haldimand-Norfolk experienced growth of 120 jobs in SMEs, with the largest gains occurring in companies employing between 10and 49 employees. It is not possible to measure the number of seasonal or contract workers employed in the food manufacturingsector, but information from local businesses suggests that the numbers are significant.In 2011, consultations with food manufacturing industries showed that companies were generally happy with the workforce andthat supply presently outweighs demand. Employers identified that people seeking work in this sector require good essentialskills including employability skills (attendance, punctuality), time management, reading and writing, and the ability to followdirections.Employers noted some shortages in the area of skilled trade journey persons, workers with specific knowledge of niche markets,and quality assurance technicians.Industry Recommendations► Upgrading opportunities for job seekers to increase their educational attainment levels► Improved candidate performance in the areas of reading comprehension, report writing, and numeracy to enable workers to receive and understand WHMIS and health & safety training► Increased awareness of the occupations within the industry and job related requirements, i.e. Personal hygiene, food safety, HACCP requirements► Access to information about apprenticeship opportunities and about financial supports for apprentices and employers 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 18
  22. 22. NAIC 325 Chemical Manufacturing The chemical manufacturing sector includes a wide variety of products including basic chemicals, resins and synthetic rubber, pesticides and fertilizers, pharmaceuticals and medicine, paint and coatings, soap and cleaning compounds, and other miscellaneous chemical products. Businesses in this sector are mainly small and medium sized enterprises, with the exception of one firm in the Brant area. Since 2008, the number of businesses in this sector has declined slightly, falling by three in Brant and one in Haldimand-Norfolk. Approximately 500 people are employed within the sector. NAIC 325 NAIC 325 Chemical Manufacturing Businesses Chemical Manufacturing Jobs Dec 2008 - June 2011 Dec 2008 - June 2011 20 600 500 400 15 300 200 10 2008 2009 2010 2011 100 2008 2009 2010 2011 Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011 Source: Derived from Statistics Canada data, 2011 The Bureau of Labour Statistics (U.S.)7 report that almost 57% of the related workforce are production workers ranging from machine operators to packagers, followed by professionals (12%) and administrative staff (11%). Similar figures are likely to occur in Canada. And while some training is on-the-job, the minimum requirements for most jobs is a college diploma or certificate. Locally, the highest numbers of people working in the sector include: ► Chemists (NOC 2112) ► Labourers in chemical products processing and utilities (NOC 9613) ► Other labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities (NOC 9619) ► Chemical plant machine operators (NOC 9421) ► Chemical plant machine operators (NOC 9421) ► Shippers and receivers (NOC 1471) Source: Statistics Canada, Grand Erie Occupational data, 2006 More detailed information about these occupations and employment opportunities can be found at www.workingincanada.gc.ca Despite recent declines in the number of jobs within this sector, many of the employers in this sector represent long-term, globally recognized firms such as S.C. Johnson and Son, Sure-Gro Corporation, Home Hardware, and Apotex Pharmachem Inc. Industry Recommendations ► Efforts should be made to include the science and technical training needed to support and grow these industries.pg 19
  23. 23. NAIC 326 Plastics and Rubber Products ManufacturingThe plastics and rubber products manufacturing sector contributes a significant number of jobs in Grand Erie’s labour force, eventhough it represents a relatively small percentage of manufacturing businesses in the region. In June 2011, 39 firms employed635 people, representing a 23.78% increase in jobs since December 2008. NAIC 326 Plastic & Rubber Products NAIC 326 Plastic & Rubber Manufacturing Businesses Products Manufacturing Jobs Dec 2008 - June 2011 Dec 2008 - June 201130 80025 700 60020 50015 40010 300 200 5 100 0 0 2008 2009 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Brant Haldimand-NorfolkSource: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011 Source: Derived from Statistics Canada data, 2011The sector, made up of mostly small and medium sized firms, produces a variety of goods including plastic bags, pipes, bottles,and automotive parts to rubber hoses and tires - products that people need every day. There is increasing pressure on this sectorto develop products that are safer, more environmentally friendly, and sustainable.In 2010, the importance of this sector in relation to revenue generation and jobs was highlighted in Manufacturing: A Grand EriePerspective and in the Brantford Economic Development Strategy.8 Subsequent consultation with local employers suggested thata shortage of skilled workers with an understanding of the manufacturing processes required exists. Most identified difficulty inrecruiting and retaining skilled technical workers due to the lack of specific training. In 2011, Workforce Planning Board of GrandErie, in partnership with the western boards, Mohawk College, and the Excellence in Manufacturing Consortium released thePlastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing Sector Training Gap Analysis9 which identified employers were finding it difficult to findqualified applicants with the skills needed to adapt to rapidly changing technology.This detailed skills evaluation assessed 300-500 skills as a means of identifying specific training needs and recommendations.Industry Recommendations► Create partnerships with high school technology programs► Benchmark industry standards for experiential skills including reading, writing, mathematics, and computer literacy► Investigate academic upgrading programs for existing staff to further develop essential skills► Investigate apprenticeship trades to offset training costs and take advantage of apprenticeship tax credits► Establish a Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition tool and process to verify knowledge and skills in core areas 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 20
  24. 24. NAIC 332 Fabricated Metal Manufacturing Fabricated metals began trending downward a decade ago, losing five businesses in the Grand Erie region between 2003 and 2008. Is was reflected in revenues that dropped from $406,749,472 to $328,252 during the same period. Similar trends were observed in the loss of 260 jobs between 2001 and 2006. The sector continues to struggle today. Recent figures show that another 13 businesses have disappeared between December 2003 and June 2011 resulting in the loss of an additional 327 jobs. NAIC 332 Fabricated Metal Product NAIC 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing Businesses Manufacturing Jobs Dec 2008 - June 2011 Dec 2008 - June 2011 120 2000 100 1500 80 1000 60 500 40 20 0 2008 2009 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011 Source: Derived from Statistics Canada data, 2011 In spite of this decline, fabricated metal manufacturing continues to be the largest source of jobs, employing more than 1,400 people. Clearly, it is important to pay attention to this sector and to support companies and workers as they transition to changing market demands. Fabricated metal manufacturing produces essential goods needed in our economy. Products include architectural and structural metals, boilers and shipping containers, hardware, springs and wire, and other metal product. Many of these products supply the automotive industry which has undergone difficult challenges including the shift of manufacturing to the U.S. and Mexico, the shift from production to parts supplier, and the increasing flow of product from China. In 2010 and 2011 local businesses confirmed these trends and noted they were doing their best to retain employees through cost-cutting measures.10 Looking ahead, local businesses within this sector noted that few entry-level or production workers would be needed and that existing and future entrants into the sector would require advanced skills in welding, CNC operations, and skilled trades. Industry Recommendations ► Industry recommendations identified the need for post-secondary and apprenticeship programs that are flexible, affordable, and innovative.pg 21
  25. 25. NAIC 333 Machinery ManufacturingThe machinery manufacturing sector is an important sub-sector of the area’s economy. Grand Erie’s machinerymanufacturing sector equals or doubles the proportion of machinery manufacturing businesses across Ontario. Thesector represents .69% of Brant’s (CD) businesses and .39% of Haldimand-Norfolk’s (IOntario = .39%) and is the 2ndlargest source of jobs in the manufacturing sector.The downward trends affecting manufacturing hit this sector later than others. The machinery manufacturing sectorlost only one business between 2003 and 2008, but experienced revenue growth during this same period. In theyears that followed (December 2008 – June 2011) larger declines were experienced with the loss of 12 businessesand 168 jobs. NAIC 333 Machinery NAIC 333 Machinery Manufacturing Businesses Manufacturing Jobs Dec 2008 - June 2011 Dec 2008 - June 2011 100060 80050 6004030 40020 200 2008 2009 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 Brant Haldimand-Norfolk Brant Haldimand-NorfolkSource: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011 Source: Derived from Statistics Canada data, 2011In response to this sector’s importance in the local economy, the Workforce Planning Board consulted withbusinesses in 2010 to assess their labour force challenges and needs. Employers confirmed that the top occupationswithin the sector would continue to focus on welders, machinists, mechanical engineers, skilled trades, and materialhandlers and shippers.11 General labourers will continue to decline.Industry Recommendations► Workers entering this sector must have technical or engineering training at the college or university level and demonstrate self-motivation, innovative thinking, and learning ability. 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 22
  26. 26. Tourism Grand Erie is home to two jewels – the winding Grand River and the sandy shores of Lake Erie – making the region an ideal tourism location. Flowing through the County of Brant, the City of Brantford and Haldimand County, the Grand River provides excellent opportunities for recreation, fishing, camping and eco-related activities. Nearby, along the southern shores of Lake Erie, Norfolk County and Haldimand County host a thriving cottage industry, a wonderful motorcycle and trail system, and an excellent birding environment. Each county has distinctive tourism advantages. Brantford is the “Tournament Capital” of Ontario, is the home to rich historical sites such as the Bell Homestead and Mohawk Chapel, and the location of one of Ontario’s most vibrant casinos. Brant County, Six Nations of the Grand River and the Mississauga of the New Credit each offer small town hospitality, festival and cultural opportunities, and a growing agriculture and culinary tourism sector. Haldimand County hosts three auto speed racing tracks and a growing Farm Fresh program promoting farmer markets and farm gate products. Norfolk County offers visitors opportunities associated with a growing wine industry, culinary experiences and eco-adventures. Clearly, tourism is an important economic driver in Grand Erie and is the source of considerable employment, but it is difficult to measure the exact number of businesses and jobs as tourism is derived from several industry sectors. To provide some definition, Statistics Canada identifies transportation, accommodation, food and beverage services, recreation and entertainment, and travel services as the primary industries. Snapshot of Business and Employment in Grand Erie Tourism Sector Using the sectors identified above, statistics show that the major industry sectors in Grand Erie’s tourism sector include Food Services and Drinking Places (NAIC722), Amusement, Gambling and Recreation Industries (NAIC713), Accommodation Services (NAIC721), and Performing Arts, Spectator Sports and Related Industries (NAIC711). These sectors represent 758 small and medium sized businesses and 8,022 jobs across the City of Brantford and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk. These numbers reflect a decline of 21 businesses and 389 jobs since December 2008, suggesting that tourism is very sensitive to both the global and domestic economic climate. The tourism sector is also affected by shifting demographics (aging population) and shifting travel patterns .pg 23
  27. 27. Top Tourism Industry Sectors by Number of SME Employers and Number of SME Employment 2008 - 2011 # OF BUSINESSES # OF BUSINESSES # OF JOBS JUNE # OF JOBS DEC NAIC DESCRIPTION JUNE 2008 DEC 2011 2008 2011 Performing Arts, Spectator Sports 711 58 55 89 81 and Related Industries Amusement, Gambling and BRANT 713 64 64 440 643 Recreation Industries 721 Accommodation Services 19 21 126 140 722 Food Services and Drinking Places 278 278 3,598 3,761 TOTAL 419 418 4,253 4,625 Performing Arts, Spectator Sports HALDIMAND-NORFOLK 711 38 34 165 161 and Related Industries Amusement, Gambling and 713 68 65 572 592 Recreation Industries 721 Accommodation Services 49 46 271 302 722 Food Services and Drinking Places 205 195 2,372 2,342 TOTAL 360 340 3,380 3,397Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns, 2011Despite the slight decline in businesses and jobs, the prospects for tourism remains strong. Revenue figures released in “AnOverview of Tourism in Norfolk County”, September 2011 show that visitor spending in Norfolk County grew from $38.7 Million in2004 to $60.7 Million in 2009. More than $76 Million dollars enters the local economy in Brantford12, and about $17 Million labourincome and $1 Million in commercial taxes occurs in Haldimand.13 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 24
  28. 28. The Labour Force Tourism is Ontario’s largest sector of employment for young people and the largest source of seasonal employment, and as a result, is often thought of as providing only short-term, low-paying work characterized by high turnover. This perception could prevent communities across Grand Erie from developing the skilled labour force required to sustain and grow tourism. In truth, employment opportunities in the tourism sector vary from entry level jobs requiring on the job training to highly specialized jobs requiring advanced education. Examples of these jobs include management positions, campground operators, event coordinators, golf course maintenance workers, outdoor adventure guides, and food and beverage servers, to name a few. What Skills Will Be Needed? All tourism jobs share common essential skills – they require workers who excel in the following: ► Customer service ► Problem solving ► Risk management ► Finding information ► Job task planning and organizing ► Working with others ► Computer proficiency ► Language proficiency Industry Recommendations ► The skills training and development relating to tourism must be a priority for the City of Brantford and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk if they wish to grow and sustain the tourism-related industries.  pg 25
  29. 29. Service-Producing SectorsThe service industry is made up of a broad variety of industries including retailers, wholesalers, transportation and warehousing,publishing, financial, education, health, and professional, scientific, and technical industries.14Over 9,700 businesses employing 45,900 people form the backbone of Grand Erie’s service, representing 60.3% of all businesses inHaldimand and Norfolk and 74.5% in Brant.The economic impact on the region differs slightly. Eighty-eight businesses were lost in Haldimand-Norfolk resulting in 391 fewerjobs. In contrast, the modest growth of twenty businesses contributed to 457 new jobs.The overall picture for the region shows that retail and wholesale trade, followed by health care and social assistance lead GrandErie in service related jobs. This may be evidence of the growing efforts to build Grand Erie’s tourism and knowledge sectors andof the changing consumer patterns of an aging population. In contrast, declines in the education, professional, scientific andtechnical professions, and administrative and support industries reflects the declining youth population. Our rural populations areat particular risk and should give consideration to strategies that attract and retain youth in our labour force.The following chart highlights employment changes for each census division by industry sector. BRANT BRANT H-N H-N NAIC – Description Employment Employment Employment Employment 2008 2011 2008 2011 41 Wholesale Trade 2,455 2,059 1,481 1,487 44-45 Retail Trade 4,835 5,066 4,611 4,349 48-49 Transportation and Warehousing 1,754 1,841 1,510 1,185 51 Information and Cultural Industries 309 327 235 260 52 Finance and Insurance 1,687 1,595 1,427 1,499 53 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 1,023 1,130 226 171 54 Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 1,483 1,541 1,162 1,095 55 Management of Companies and Enterprises 699 778 296 227 56 Administrative and Support, Waste management and 1,505 1,379 961 947 Remediation Services 61 Educational Services 498 446 267 198 62 Health Care and Social Assistance 2,554 2,835 1,690 2,037 71 Arts, Entertainment and Recreation 567 768 749 765 72 Accommodation and Food Services 3,724 3,901 2,643 2,644 81 Other Services (except Public Admin) 2,390 2,389 1,660 1,696 91 Public Administration 200 214 148 76Source: Derived from Statistics Canada Data, 2011 = Growth 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 26
  30. 30. Utilities The utilities sector is made up of companies engaged in operating electric, gas and water utilities. They generate, control and distribute electric power, natural gas and water. The main sub-sectors in this industry include: ► Electric Power Generation, Transmission and distribution – NAICS 2211 ► Natural Gas Distribution – NAICS 2212 ► Water, Sewage and Other Systems – NAICS 2223 Although the sector is relatively small throughout Grand Erie, the sector has strong connections to green activities related to renewable energy, bioenergy, hydrogen and fuel cells, energy saving lighting and HVAC, and advanced batteries, energy storage and charging systems.15 Grand Erie’s utility sector is currently made up of 22 small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) and one larger firm employing between 100 and 199. Employment in the SMEs totaled 320 in 2011, with an additional 100-199 working in the larger firm. These numbers reflect the loss of three businesses and 14 jobs since 2008. Future changes are expected as the future of Ontario Power Generation’s coal-fired facility in Nanticoke winds down operations. Negotiations are currently underway with the government to convert the facility to a natural gas operation. This transition will have implications for current workers facing lay-off or who require skills upgrading.pg 27
  31. 31. Get InvolvedThe question we are asked most often is “what are we going to do to get our jobs back?” and it is a question that is impossible toanswer. We can, however, look at the wonderful things our communities have to offer; the strength of our people, and our desireto succeed and use these attributes to build new opportunities.Our economic strongholds, manufacturing and agriculture will continue to be important sources of employment in the future.It is our job as a community to work with our local employers to identify what skills and education workers will need to becomeleaders in innovation, technology, and change management.We will also need to work together to support people with the education, training, and skills development needed for growingand emerging sectors. We need to assess whether our traditional methods of delivering these services fits with emerging needs.There is no room for blame – experienced workers without the skills needed in today’s job market were more than sufficientlyqualified when they entered the workforce. In contrast, our youth and newcomers who are well educated lack on-the-jobexperience needed to enter the workforce. For others, such as our aboriginal residents and people with disabilities, findingemployment has always been challenging and the recent economy increases the barriers.We have an opportunity to be innovative, creative and entrepreneurial as we shape the future. As community members youidentified the leading edge workforce needed for our future. Please get involved. Your talent, passion, and ability to lead is needed to move “ideas into action”. 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 28
  32. 32. References 1. Mayor’s Remarks: Accommodation Review: Student attendance dwindling at all public schools 2. Statistics Canada, Annual Labour Force Survey 3. Grand Erie Immigrant Profile. www.workforceplanningbord.org/immigration 4. Brant County: Agriculture and Labour Force Analysis Study. http://www.workforceplanningboard.org/files/upload/Ag_Study_BrantCountyReport-final.pdf Norfolk County: Agriculture and Labour Force Analysis Study. http://www.workforceplanningboard.org/files/upload/Ag_Study_NorfolkCountyReport-final.pdf Haldimand County: Agriculture and Labour Force Analysis Study. http://www.workforceplanningboard.org/files/upload/Ag_Study_HaldimandCountyReport-final.pdf 5. Post Secondary Education as a catalyst for Economic Development Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie. Forging Apprenticeships 6. Manufacturing: A Grand Erie Perspective, 2010. http://www.workforceplanningboard.org/files/upload/workforce_planning_manufacturing.pdf 7. Bureau of Labour Statistics. http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg/cgs008.htm 8. Brantford Economic Development Strategy. 2010 9. Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing Training Gap Analysis. http://www.workforceplanningboard.org/files/upload/Investing_in_Training_report.pdf 10. Trends, Opportunities and Priorities, 2010 11. Trends, Opportunities and Priorities, 2010. TOP 2010 12. Brantford’s Business/Marketing Plan 2011-12. www.discoverbrantford.com 13. http://www.haldimandcounty.on.ca/Business.aspx?id=974 14. Industry Canada. Service Industry NAICS 15. The Future of the Green Economy: Grand Erie, Hamilton, and Niagara. http://www.workforceplanningboard.org/files/upload/GreenJobsReport.pdf  pg 29
  33. 33. Consultation ParticipantsAnnex Business Media MTCUBrant Jobs Norfolk District Business Development CorporationBrant Skills Centre Norfolk Assoc. for Com. LivingCareerLink Norfolk County Economic Development and TourismCarrier Transport Norfolk County – Mayor Dennis TravaleCity of Brantford Social Services Norfolk Federation of AgricultureCommunity Resource Service Norfolk General HospitalConsultant OMAFRACounty of Brant-Economic Development and Tourism Patriot ForgeFanshawe College (2) Roundtable on PovertyGrand Erie District School Board (3) School College Work Grand RiverGrand River Community Health Care (2) Six Nations Band CouncilGrand River Employment & Training (9) Six Nations Elected CouncilGrand River Post Sec Ed. Office Board (2) Six Nations PolytechnicGrand Valley Educational Society St. Joseph’s Lifecare CentreHaldimand County St. Leonard’s Community ServicesIndependent Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Two Rivers Community Dev. CentreInstitute of Food Proc. Tech.-Conestoga College (2) US SteelJohn Noble Home YMCA Immigrant Settlement ServicesJoint Apprenticeship Training, Local 67 YMCA Immigrant Settlement ServicesKelly Services (3)KJ Business SolutionsLaurier UniversityLockwood ManufacturingMarch of Dimes CanadaMedix School (2)Economic Development ConsultationsCounty of Brant – Economic Development and TourismCity of Brantford - Manager – Economic Development and TourismCity of Brantford - Economic Development OfficerNorfolk County – Economic Development and TouriismHaldimand County – Economic Development and Tourisment and Tourism 2012 Labour Market Plan | pg 30
  34. 34. Definitions References to appendix A and appendix B have been combined and are reflected in the glossary of terms below: Base Indicators: These eight local labour market indicators are Labour Market Challenges: A challenge refers to the possibility that Total employment and Sector Employment, Employment in Small there is an imbalance in demand and supply of labour [including and Medium Enterprises, Number of Employers, Industrial Structure skills, occupation and education]. A challenge by its very nature offers of Employers, Population Dynamics, Migration, Occupation and both a “problem” and an “opportunity”. An unemployed or under- Education. employed worker is a wasted resource and a problem. However, that worker’s potential is also an opportunity to be deployed elsewhere. Base Profile: The Base Profile consists of the Base Indicators and the Ontario Contextual Data. Local: Local refers to the CD or CMA or the area of the Local Board as relevant in the particular context. Business Pattern Data: The Canadian Business Patterns database provided by Statistics Canada identifies the number of business Local Knowledge or Intelligence: Local knowledge refers to establishments (employers) within a Census Division (CD). The information, not impressions or perspectives without benefit of database also identifies the number of employers by detailed industry support, received from local business groups, educational institutions, and for nine different employee size ranges. Canadian Business economic development bodies, key sector informants, service Pattern data is available every six months (June and December) with providers and community leaders. an approximate five week time lag for release. Mobility: Mobility refers to the movement of a worker from one Census Division (CD): A Census Division is a group of neighbouring employer to another, from one industry to another, from one skill to municipalities joined together for the purposes of regional planning. another or to one location from another. Census Division is the general term for provincially legislated areas NAICS: The North American Industry Classification System [NAICS] such as county and regional districts. is the system used by the statistical agencies of Canada, the United Census Metropolitan Area (CMA): A Census Metropolitan Area is a States and Mexico to classify business establishments for the purpose large urban area (known as urban core) together with adjacent urban of collecting, analyzing, and publishing statistical data related to the and rural areas (known as urban and rural fringe) that have a high economy. degree of social and economic integration with the urban core. A NOC: The National Occupational Classification [NOC[was developed CMA has an urban core population of at least 100,000. by Human Resources Skills Development Canada in collaboration Economic Region (ER): Statistics Canada defines an Economic with Statistics Canada to describe in a consistent framework the work Region as a geographic unit generally composed of several Census done by Canadians. Divisions within a province. Economic Regions enable reliable labour Net Employment Rate: The Net Employment Rate shows the net force estimates for areas that too small on their own, so they are change in employment as a proportion of total employment at the grouped with a neighbouring region(s). beginning of the identified period (i.e. 2001). Employment: The employment numbers in the Base Profile refer to Private Sector Employer: Private sector employers refers to any total employment, including full and part time. employer that is a legal private corporation, a partnership or sole Generation Loss Ratio: The Generation Loss Ratio shows the proprietorship. number of jobs created for every 100 jobs lost. Public Sector Employment: A public sector employer refers to a Industrial Sectors: The industrial sectors described refers to the government agency or owned entity and strongly affected by public classification into which all economic activity is placed. See NAICS policy. For our purposes, it refers to the following sectors postal below. services [491], monetary authorities [521], educational services [611], ambulatory health care [621], hospitals [622], nursing/residential care Job Generation Rate: The Job Generation Rate shows the number of [623], social assistance [624] and public administration [913, 914 and jobs created as a proportion of total employment at the beginning of 919]. the period identified (i.e. 2001). Research: For our purposes, after the Base Indicators have been Job Loss Rate: The Job Loss Rate shows the number of jobs lost as investigated with the aid of the Challenge Questions, further research a proportion of total employment at the beginning of the defined areas or questions may have been identified. Such further research period (i.e. 2001). might use primary data [collected directly by the researcher] or use Labour Force Survey [LFS]: The Labour Force Survey is the primary secondary data [collected by Statistics Canada or other statistical source of employment data for Canada, the provinces, economic agency]. regions and major urban areas [Census Metropolitan Areas – CMA]. Small and Medium Enterprise (SME): Small and Medium Employers It is generated by a statistically representative sample of Canadian are those that employ 99 workers or less. households and is generated every month. Taxfiler: Statistics Canada, Small Area and Administrative Data Labour Market Adjustment: Labour market adjustment refers to the Division (Taxfiler) generates a wealth of socio-economic and response of the labour market to changes in the demand for or supply demographic data derived from personal income tax returns of labour. Successful adjustment implies that workers are moving submitted each year by Canadians. Data is usually available about 18 from areas of declining demand to those of increasing demand. months after the year in question. Unsuccessful adjustment suggests that workers are unable to find new employment opportunities and/or that employers are unable to meet their needs for labour.pg 31
  35. 35. Our Vision“A skilled, adaptable workforce contributing to a vibrant economy” www.workforceplanningboard.org

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