Presentation   baltimore regional talent development pipeline study
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Presentation baltimore regional talent development pipeline study

on

  • 267 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
267
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
267
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Presentation   baltimore regional talent development pipeline study Presentation baltimore regional talent development pipeline study Presentation Transcript

    • Baltimore Regional Talent Development Pipeline Study October 30, 2013
    • Socio-Economic and Labor Market Conditions
    • Highly-Educated Region Adults with Bachelor's Degree 40% 35% 30% 25% Baltimore Area United States 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1980 1990 2000 2010
    • Prosperous Region Median Household Income $70,000 $60,000 $50,000 $40,000 Baltimore Area United States $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $1980 1990 2000 2010
    • Economic Recovery Total Employment, Baltimore Region Residents 1,340 1,320 1,300 1,280 1,260 1,240 Source: Current Employment Statistics Database Aug, 2013 Aug, 2012 Aug, 2011 Aug, 2010 Aug, 2009 Aug, 2008 Aug, 2007 Aug, 2006 Aug, 2005 Aug, 2004 1,220 Aug, 2003 Total Employment (000) 1,360
    • Income Disparities Source: National Center for Smart Growth
    • Income Disparities Median Household Income 2012 $108,844 $89,179 $80,028 $76,645 $62,444 United States $51,371 $39,241 Howard County Anne Arundel County Carroll County Harford County Baltimore Baltimore County city Source: American Community Survey 2012 Estimates
    • Racial Disparities in Opportunity Average Unemployment Rate By Race 2006-2010, Baltimore Region 9.6% 7.8% 5.8% 5.6% 4.3% White 3.7% Black Latino Asian Other/Two or Total, All Races More Races Source: American Community Survey 2006-2010 Estimates
    • Educational Attainment Affects Opportunity Unemployment Rate By Educational Attainment, Baltimore Region, 2011 Educational Attainment Share of the Labor Force Less than high school 8% graduate High school graduate or 25% equivalent Some college or 28% Associates degree Bachelors degree or 38% higher Total Population 25 to 64 100% years Unemployment Rate Source: American Community Survey 2011 Estimates 20.7% 11.4% 7.9% 3.8% 7.8%
    • Elevated Number of Unemployed Baltimore Region Employment and Unemployment - Comparative Measures 1,400 140,000 1,357 120,343 Total Employment (000) 1,350 120,000 1,298 1,300 1,250 1,242 1,219 1,194 1,200 1,150 100,000 48,602 80,000 60,000 40,000 1,100 20,000 1,050 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Employment of Baltimore Region Residents (LAUS) Employment at Businesses/Governments in the Baltimore Region (QCEW) Unemployment of Baltimore Region Residents (LAUS) Source: Local Area Unemployment Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages Total Unemployed Persons 1,363
    • Barriers to Employment Opportunity Encountered by Low-Skilled Adults Transportation Barriers Low Basic Math and Literacy Skills Difficulties finding a job that can cover basic living expenses Lack of Technical Skills or Credentials Limited Social Network Lack of Experience
    • Best Practices for Workforce Development Among Low-Skilled Adults Career Pathways offer a clear sequence of education and training courses and credentials that are built around: Sector Strategies • • “Stackable” Training Aligned with the skill needs of industry sectors. Employers actively engaged in determining skill requirements. • • Multiple Entry/Exit Points • Enable workers of • varying education and skill levels to enter or advance in a specific sector or occupational field. Arranged or “chunked” in a non-duplicative progression of courses. Provide opportunities to earn credits that have labor market value. Contextual Learning • Intensive WrapAround Services Incorporate academic and career counseling and wraparound support services (particularly at points of transition). Instructional strategies • that make work a central context for learning and help students attain work • readiness skills. Designs for Working Learners • Meet needs of • nontraditional students who combine work and study. Source: The Promise of Career Pathways: Systems Change (2012) Accelerated/Integrat ed Learning Combine adult education with postsecondary technical training. Accelerate career advancement of participants. Industry Credentials Lead to the attainment of industry-recognized degrees or credentials that have value in the labor market.
    • Industry-Led Sector Strategies Produce Superior and Lasting Results Over the long-term, participants in sector-based workforce development… Are more consistently employed Have significantly higher earnings Source: Job Training the Works: Findings from the Sectorial Employment Impact Study
    • Goals of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study • Identify sector opportunities for lowskilled workers to progress into midskilled jobs that pay a family supporting wage. • Determine the training and educational pipeline linked to those careers. • Implement strategies to ensure a pipeline of qualified workers is available to meet the current and future workforce needs of the region’s high growth industries
    • How the Study Informs the Regional Workforce Development Plan 1 Regional Talent Development Pipeline Study 2 Analysis of Barriers to Employment Opportunity 3 4 Career-Related Transportation Barriers Analysis Career Pathways 5 Regional Workforce Development Plan
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study 1. There is a wide disparity in labor market outcomes and opportunities for high skilled vs. low skilled adults. • Workers who do not have a high school diploma or equivalent have unemployment levels more than five times higher than workers with a Bachelor’s degree. • One third of the region’s workforce is comprised of individuals who either have not completed a high school diploma or have attained a high school diploma or equivalent as their highest level of education.
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study 2. The region’s job opportunities fall mainly into two categories: (1) high-paying jobs requiring at least a Bachelors degree and (2) jobs that require few technical skills and pay less than a living wage. • Mid-skilled job opportunities that pay a living wage comprise a small portion of the labor market. • This trend is evident at a macro level and for most industry sectors, making it difficult for low skilled workers to recognize and progress into specialized mid-skill career paths that pay family-supporting wages.
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study 3. A review of occupational hiring requirements in 13 industry sectors reveals that six sectors offer the greatest promise for low skilled workers to move into family-supporting, mid-skilled jobs: 1. The healthcare sector, 2. The construction sector, 3. The information technology sector (including cybersecurity), 4. The transportation and warehousing sector, 5. The business services sector, and 6. The manufacturing sector.
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study Share of Jobs by Minimum Education Required to Begin Work, 13 Selected Industry Sectors 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Jobs with Minimum Entry Requirements of a High School Diploma or Less Jobs Requiring an Associates Degree, Post-Secondary Award, or Some College Jobs Requiring a Bachelor's Degree or Higher
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study Share of Jobs by Minimum Education Required to Begin Work, 13 Selected Industry Sectors 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Jobs with Minimum Enrty Requirements of a High School Diploma or Less Jobs requiring and Associates Degree, Post-Secondary Award, or Some College Jobs Requiring a Bachelor's Degree or Higher
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study 4. There are 39 occupations in the six sectors that are midskilled occupations where workers can progress into a position earning a living wage.
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study Healthcare Construction 1. Medical Assistants 2. Medical Records and Health Information Technicians 3. Pharmacy Technicians 4. Surgical Technologists 5. Radiologic Technologists and Technicians 6. Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians 7. Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses 8. Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics 9. Registered Nurses 10.Respiratory Therapists 11.Dental Hygienists 1. Electricians 2. Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters 3. Carpenters 4. Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators 5. Highway Maintenance Workers 6. Brickmasons and Blockmasons 7. Glaziers 8. Elevator Installers and Repairers 9. Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers *Note: Also a top manufacturing occupation IT / Cybersecurity 1. Computer Support Specialists* 2. Computer Systems Analysts* 3. Network and Computer Systems Administrators 4. Information Security Analysts, Web Developers, and Computer Network Architects Transportation & Logistics 1. Industrial Truck and Tractor Operators 2. Heavy and TractorTrailer Truck Drivers 3. Cargo and Freight Agents 4. Dispatchers 5. Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists Business Services 1. Tax Preparers 2. Human Resources Assistants 3. Hazardous Materials Removal Workers 4. Environmental Science and Protection Technicians, Including Health 5. Civil Engineering Technicians* 6. Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians* 7. Mechanical Engineering Technicians 8. Other Engineering Technicians 9. Architectural and Civil Drafters 10.Mechanical Drafters*
    • Key Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study Future Hiring Demand 2012-2020, Selected Sectors and Selected Occupations 143,712 Unemployed Persons in the Baltimore Region 2012: 105,000 Projected Hiring in 39 Selected Mid-Skill Occupations (2012-2020): 35,800 49,374 46,787 35,804 17,254 14,450 7,163 Healthcare Occupations 17,839 12,458 7,166 Construction Occupations Information Technology Occupations Hiring in Selected Occupations (Economy-Wide) 4,449 Transportation and Logisitcs Occupations 2,576 Business Services Occupations Five-Sector Total Hiring in the Sector (Total, All Occupations)
    • Detailed Findings of the Baltimore Talent Development Pipeline Study
    • Detailed Findings: Projected Job Creation and Total Hiring Demand New Job Creation by Sector 2012-2020 Healthcare 20,049 Business Services 15,608 Education 12,509 Total Hiring Demand Incl. Turnover Healthcare 49,374 Business Services 46,787 Hospitality & Tourism Hospitality & Tourism 6,000 Retail Trade Construction 5,867 Education Bioscience 5,825 39,658 Construction 37,514 33,270 17,254 Retail Trade 4,695 Bioscience 15,694 Information Technology 4,479 Finance & Insurance 14,783 Transportation And Warehousing 1,842 Information Technology 12,458 Finance & Insurance 1,624 Manufacturing 11,889 Wholesale 1,528 Wholesale Manufacturing 789 Transportation & Warehousing Utilities 440 Utilities 10,093 7,746 1,532
    • Detailed Findings: Projected Job Creation and Total Hiring Demand New Job Creation by Sector 2012-2020 Healthcare 20,049 Business Services 15,608 Education 12,509 Total Hiring Demand Incl. Turnover Healthcare 49,374 Business Services 46,787 Hospitality & Tourism Hospitality & Tourism 6,000 Retail Trade Construction 5,867 Education Bioscience 5,825 39,658 Construction 37,514 33,270 17,254 Retail Trade 4,695 Bioscience 15,694 Information Technology 4,479 Finance & Insurance 14,783 Transportation And Warehousing 1,842 Information Technology 12,458 Finance & Insurance 1,624 Manufacturing 11,889 Wholesale 1,528 Wholesale Manufacturing 789 Transportation & Warehousing Utilities 440 Utilities 10,093 7,746 1,532
    • Detailed Findings: Share of Jobs by Minimum Educational Requirements Associate's Degree, PostLess than High High School Diploma Secondary Award, or Some School or Equivalent College, less than a Bachelor's Degree Bioscience Business Services Construction Education Finance & Insurance Healthcare Hospitality & Tourism IT Manufacturing Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Utilities Wholesalers Bachelor's Degree or Higher 2% 13% 18% 4% 6% 11% 76% 2% 15% 62% 25% 36% 65% 28% 64% 30% 20% 28% 55% 31% 13% 12% 12% 5% 4% 38% 2% 13% 11% 3% 60% 38% 5% 63% 26% 22% 2% 57% 19% 3% 24% 4% 15% 66% 63% 61% 4% 11% 8% 6% 22% 16%
    • Detailed Findings: Average Wages by Minimum Educational Requirements Less than High School Bioscience Business Services Construction Education Finance & Insurance Healthcare Hospitality & Tourism IT Manufacturing Retail Trade Transportation And Warehousing Utilities Wholesalers Associate's Degree, PostHigh School Diploma Secondary Award, or Some or Equivalent College, less than a Bachelor's Degree Bachelor's Degree or Higher $13.90 $12.39 $16.19 $11.39 $12.87 $11.05 $10.02 $13.30 $13.30 $11.77 $24.37 $20.81 $23.01 $17.05 $23.63 $18.42 $18.62 $24.73 $20.40 $19.55 $33.55 $32.58 $40.91 $28.11 $45.04 $27.50 $47.91 $33.86 $36.36 $45.67 $42.05 $42.60 $38.91 n.a. $41.36 $40.46 $31.64 $44.33 $43.27 $47.61 $14.34 $19.98 $44.14 $41.44 $14.11 $13.65 $23.18 $23.99 $38.23 $42.28 $41.98 $43.42
    • Detailed Findings: Talent Development Pipeline • 2,049 post-secondary educational programs in the Baltimore Region that reported combined enrolment of 199,218 students during the 2011-2012 period. Regional Post-Secondary Enrolment in Programs Linked to Each Sector • • • 1,778 college and university programs with combined enrolment of 184,844 students in 2012. 186 WIA-eligible training programs with combined enrolment of 7,939 students (2012). 85 other programs (non-WIA eligible) with combined enrolment of 6,435 students. 46,250 graduates from all programs in the most recent year of reporting (2011-2012). 64,015 Business Services • Education 61,648 Healthcare 48,194 Bioscience Information Technology 28,869 15,117 Hospitality & Tourism 7,485 Finance & Insurance 6,995 Manufacturing 4,556 Wholesale 3656 Transportation and Warehousing 2,957 Construction 2,792 Utilities Retail Trade 1493 888
    • Detailed Findings: Talent Development Pipeline • 2,049 post-secondary educational programs in the Baltimore Region that reported combined enrolment of 199,218 students during the 2011-2012 period. Regional Post-Secondary Enrolment in Programs Linked to Each Sector • • • 1,778 college and university programs with combined enrolment of 184,844 students in 2012. 186 WIA-eligible training programs with combined enrolment of 7,939 students (2012). 85 other programs (non-WIA eligible) with combined enrolment of 6,435 students. 46,250 graduates from all programs in the most recent year of reporting (2011-2012). 64,015 Business Services • Education 61,648 Healthcare 48,194 Bioscience Information Technology 28,869 15,117 Hospitality & Tourism 7,485 Finance & Insurance 6,995 Manufacturing 4,556 Wholesale 3656 Transportation and Warehousing 2,957 Construction 2,792 Utilities Retail Trade 1493 888
    • Regional Education and Training Capacity Sector Bioscience Business Srvs. Construction Education Finance & Ins. Healthcare Hospitality & Tourism IT Manufacturing Retail Trade Transportation & Warehousing Utilities Wholesale Training and Education Capacity Enrolment in Enrolment in WIA- All Programs Less WIA-Eligible Programs Less Eligible Training than a Bachelor's Training Programs than a Bachelor's Programs Degree Degree 7 119 115 6,072 56 1,000 341 18,115 26 586 62 2,677 2 338 142 40,329 7 144 52 2,881 66 4,153 218 20,150 Total Educational and Training Programs Total Enrolment All Programs 384 767 65 413 101 459 28,869 61,648 2,792 64,015 6,995 48,194 7 244 39 2,212 115 7,485 28 176 151 5,490 271 15,117 9 4 189 99 38 9 1,506 649 72 15 4,556 888 15 1,668 44 2,918 45 2,957 9 1,129 10 33 486 2,201 17 45 1493 3656
    • Regional Education and Training Capacity Sector Bioscience Business Srvs. Construction Education Finance & Ins. Healthcare Hospitality & Tourism IT Manufacturing Retail Trade Transportation & Warehousing Utilities Wholesale Training and Education Capacity Enrolment in Enrolment in WIA- All Programs Less WIA-Eligible Programs Less Eligible Training than a Bachelor's Training Programs than a Bachelor's Programs Degree Degree 7 119 115 6,072 56 1,000 341 18,115 26 586 62 2,677 2 338 142 40,329 7 144 52 2,881 66 4,153 218 20,150 Total Educational and Training Programs Total Enrolment All Programs 384 767 65 413 101 459 28,869 61,648 2,792 64,015 6,995 48,194 7 244 39 2,212 115 7,485 28 176 151 5,490 271 15,117 9 4 189 99 38 9 1,506 649 72 15 4,556 888 15 1,668 44 2,918 45 2,957 9 1,129 10 33 486 2,201 17 45 1493 3656
    • Gaps in Training Capacity Job Opportunity 57,089 4.70% 15,694 Pct. Of Jobs with Minimum Education Requiremen t Less than a Bachelors Degree 40% 190,554 15.60% 46,787 67,953 5.60% Education Finance & Insurance Healthcare Hospitality & Tourism Information Technology Manufacturing 116,339 Average Annual Earnings 2012 Enrollment Average Hourly Wage 2012 Programs WIA-Eligible Training Enrollment Share of Total Hiring Workforce Demand (Employed (Including in the Turnover) Region) 2012-2020 All Education and Training Programs Lasting Less than Four Years Programs Sector Employment Earnings for Occupations in the Sector Training and Education Capacity 7 119 115 6,072 $36.09 $75,144 62% 56 1,000 341 18,115 $29.55 $61,550 17,254 95% 26 586 62 2,677 $24.62 $51,216 9.50% 33,270 37% 2 338 142 40,329 n.a. $58,992 71,452 5.90% 14,783 74% 7 144 52 2,881 $28.45 $59,183 188,405 15.50% 49,374 78% 66 4,153 218 20,150 $25.95 $54,288 118,294 9.70% 39,658 98% 7 244 39 2,212 $12.87 $26,719 49,182 4.00% 12,458 43% 28 176 151 5,490 $36.82 $76,586 62,863 5.20% 11,889 81% 9 189 38 1,506 $25.43 $52,891 Retail Trade Transportation & Warehousing Utilities 138,329 11.30% 37,514 97% 4 99 9 649 $16.56 $34,451 32,100 2.60% 7,746 94% 15 1,668 44 2,918 $20.94 $43,565 5,894 0.50% 1,532 78% - - 10 486 $28.73 $59,760 Wholesale 46,389 3.80% 10,093 84% 9 1,129 33 2,201 $26.93 $56,008 2012 Bioscience Business Services Construction
    • Implications for the Regional Workforce Development Plan • Industry-led partnerships will be an important component of the plan, especially in high-opportunity sectors. • Many mid-skilled family-supporting jobs are specialist/niche occupations (100s of job openings, rather than 1,000s). Resources will be needed to offer a broad menu of training options for these diverse occupations. • Efforts to increase graduation rates and promote a successful transition to post- secondary education and/or training are essential.
    • Implications for the Regional Workforce Development Plan • Training to prepare low-skilled workers for promising entry-level positions will require a combination of essential skills training, basic math and literacy education, and technical skills training needed for mid-skilled occupations. • Strategies to reduce transportation barriers, social barriers, and other barriers should be designed to support workers in high-opportunity sectors. • Example: Ensure transit service is available to areas where transportation & logistics businesses are located, and is available for 2nd and 3rd shift workers).
    • Next Steps • • • • Study of Barriers to Employment Opportunity GIS Analysis of the Journey to Work Career Pathways Mapping Regional Workforce Development Plan Preview: Off-Peak Transit Times for Cherry Hill Residents to Travel to Transportation and Logistics Sector Jobs