Feminist Social Media Webinar for Teens

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  • Young teens, ages 12- 17 are mostly joiners, joining social networking sites. The second most popular activity is classified as “spectator” and these teens are reading blogs, watching peer-generated videos and listening to pod casts.
  • Where are you in online spaces?
  • According to a Pew Study, 56% of girls agree that social networking helps them feel closer and more connected to their friends.   52% have gotten involved with a cause or issue they care about through social networking. We’ll be focusing on three tools: Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. Each have their own demographics and serve a different purpose. If your campaign is a local protest, you’ll be based on a different platform than you would be if you were generating awareness about a sexist T-shirt company. So which tools are appropriate for your campaign? Ignite Social Media will give you key demographic information about who is on which platform so you can target key players in your campaign. http://www.ignitesocialmedia.com/social-media-stats/2011-social-network-analysis-report/#Tumblr
  • Twitter is a great place to post and share any existing content. Similarly, live tweeting TV-shows, protest and events brings your campaign to people’s attention. It also gives you followers for you to target once a particular event is over. -Make sure you tweet at people using the @ sign. - Tweet photos and original blog content. Create a # hastag for your campaign Add another hashtag to include your cause in other discussions:
  • Here’s list of some of the most useful tags. Hashtags tag and categorize tweets with relevant content so that they can be easily found and followed by others. Other Hashtags: #fem2 – general feminist hashtag #women #wmnhist –chronicles women’s history, notable women #activism #feminist, #feminism #sexism, #sexist, #gender #beauty, #bodyimage, #health #media, #film, #TV #sextech – sexuality and technology (e.g. sexting, textual harassment) #sparkchange-anti-sexualization Women’s Media Center hashtags: #WMC (or tweet at us @womensmediacntr) #WMCAction #WMCWatchin #sheparty
  • Facebook is a great place to have a localized campaign as most young people list their locations and are truthful about it. If you don’t want to use your personal profile to coordinate a campaign, create an anonymous one. If your identity is important to the cause, limit what people can see unless they are friends with you in Account tab>privacy settings. Facebook GROUPS work best for interacting with people: commenting, liking, posting links, etc Facebook PAGES work only if you want people to “like” things. It’s hard to generate discussions on a FB page because you can’t comment as the page, only as yourself. For example, if you had a Montclair HS Barbie Liberation Organization, you couldn’t comment on people’s posts as “Barbie”. As a result, FB pages limit the conversation to one way. Facebook http://mashable.com/2009/05/27/facebook-page-vs-group/
  • I would encourage everyone to get a tumblr if you don’t already have one. Tumblr is a micro blogging platform: a mixture of twitter and blogger. First of all, it’s the most feminist and female-dominated social media tool on the web. Second, and as a result, the content is snarky, smart and easily sharable. Third, it’s the most queer-positive site including straight allies. Tumblr can be used as a consciousness raising tool but the important thing to remember is that images get reblogged the most so spend time creating an image that has all ur event or cause details in it – text is harder to read while “tumbling” so copy/pasting a press release here ISN’T the best idea.
  • Ignore buzzwords. RSS , SEO , AdSense ,. If you have a buzz word buzzing in your head and you're not sure if it belongs on the ignore list, assume it does. 2. Pick a topic — you can change it when you know what you're doing. This is like dating. Pick something that seems good, and if it isn't, try again. Don't get hung up on topic. As in dating, you'll know when you've found one that's the right fit. There are some obvious things, like pick a topic you have a lot to say about, pick something that interests you , pick something that will help your career . This is great advice, but you already know that if you look for a perfect match you'll never actually go on a date. 3. Spend two seconds choosing software. Ignore the fact that there are lots of choices . I will give you two: Blogger and TypePad . Pick one. It doesn't matter which one. Click on the home page where it says open an account. Don't worry about what you click during setup. It's very hard to do damage that you can't fix later. 4. Post something right now. Don't tell yourself you'll do it tomorrow. Blogging is about courage to say something. Don't worry about being stupid because trust me, no one is reading your blog . Post anything. You can nix bad posts later. For now just start writing. 5. Practice, practice, practice. Post, post, post. Soon you'll find the link button and make a link. Maybe you'll find a category button and make a category. Maybe you won't find those buttons for weeks. Don't worry. You're practicing . And if you happen to write something really good you can feature it later , when people are reading. 6. Ignore your lack of readers. The hardest part is sitting down to post on a regular basis . Don't distract yourself with blog promotion until you're sure you can actually do the writing. If you can blog regularly for a month, you can be a blogger. When you get to number six, and you've made it through a month, go back over this post, and click all the stuff I told you to ignore.
  • Remixing popular culture is a fun way to put feminism into practice and subvert those Saturday morning cartoon ads. This gendered ad remixer was made by a few of my video friends. Just drag and drop two videos into the player and a remixer swaps the audio and video. From there you can post your favorites to YouTube or Facebook. This is a great tool if your campaign or cause revolves around media critique, gender roles and/or popular culture. Making remix videos is one fun and easy way to talk back to pop-culture.
  • The more hours of TV a girl watches, the fewer options she thinks she has in life; the more hours of TV a boy watches the more sexist his views become.  If female characters are added to media programming at the current rate, gender balance won’t occur for 700 years.  The point is to make something, a blog, a video, a tumblr. Anything that gets your voice out there. At the WMC, our goal is to always make women more visible in the media. Social media is one of the best ways for teens to do this. When you’re a teen in a social space, you represent your content. So make sure you keep certain details private. Depending on your cause, you might not want to tell people what town you’re based in or your AIM address. None of the social media tools used here require you to include these details so you can always opt out or make something up. For the longest time, my location on twitter was “Earth”.

Transcript

  • 1. Feminist Social Media Webinar For Teens. a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
  • 2. a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
  • 3. Where are you? a Progressive Girls' Voices Program Would you classify yourself as a creator? Joiner? Spectator? Critic? Collector (of information)? Inactive?
  • 4. Connection. a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
      • According to a Pew Study, 56% of girls agree that social networking helps them feel closer and more connected to their friends.  
      • 52% have gotten involved with a cause or issue they care about through social networking.
    • http://bit.ly/qp7mJ0
    • key demographic information
    • target key players in your campaign.
  • 5. SoMe: Twitter a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
  • 6. SoMe: Twitter a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
  • 7. SoMe: Facebook a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
    • Great for local campaigns
    • Limit access to profile for everyone or just certain people.
    • Group vs. Page vs. Person
    • http://on.mash.to/rrzMh
    • More info on groups vs. pages
  • 8. SoMe: Tumblr a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
    • Most feminist and female-dominated social media tool on the web.
    • The content is snarky, smart and easily sharable.
    • Most queer-positive site including straight allies.
    • Most teens are micro blogging here
  • 9. Blogging. 
    • 1. Ignore buzzwords.
    • 2. Pick a topic — you can change it when you know what you're doing.
    • 3. Spend two seconds choosing software.
    • 4. Post something right now.
    • 5. Practice, practice, practice.
    • 6. Ignore your lack of readers.
    •  
    • 7. When in doubt, Tumblr
    a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
  • 10. Remixing. a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
    • Great tool if your campaign or cause revolves around media critique, gender roles and/or popular culture.
    • Easy way to integrate video
    • Able to post right to YouTube and Facebook .
  • 11. Make something, anything. 
      • The more hours of TV a girl watches, the fewer options she thinks she has in life; the more hours of TV a boy watches the more sexist his views become. 
      • If female characters are added to media programming at the current rate, gender balance won’t occur for 700 years.   
    • source: Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
    a Progressive Girls' Voices Program
  • 12.
    • stay connected.
      • Sign up for our news brief  
      • Video Journalism Webinar: Girls State of the Union
      •   "Join Us" womensmediacenter.com
      • Twitter List - send me your handle 
    a Progressive Girls' Voices Program