How To Thrive After Losing Your Job

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The members of Connect: Professional Women's Network share their advice for bouncing back after a lay off. For more discussions and to join the Connect group, visit http://www.linkedin.com/womenconnect.

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  • Here is what I think a healthy, passionate, experienced woman is to do, who has so much to offer to the job market, who could make such a difference in the lives of so many. Call and write to their Congress and Senator's office and fight to have outsourcing laws changed. The problem with downsizing and restructuring is because we here in the US allow companies to send our jobs to other countries and I live in an "at will employment state." I was a loyal employee with 31 years of good performance reviews in 3 different departments and outstanding attendance. The company I worked for claimed my job was being eliminated due to cost cutting. Yet they did not transfer me to an open Administrative job and were able to pay out bonuses every year. The only way to get laws changes is to fight for what is right. Far too many hard working men and women in the US are working for greedy companies. The company I worked for was a privately held company so they had no stock holders to answer to, just greedy individuals that enough was never enough. I have even thought of setting up a “GoFund Me” page to get this fight going.
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  • @Karen La Du I totally feel for you and understand. The company I worked for eliminated my job after 31 years and 3 months to the day last July. I have years of experience in Accounting and being a Administrative Assistant yet the only job I have been able to get is a cashier at a gas station. This job was at a new gas station. They agreed to pay me more than minimum wage and have no business they cut my hours an are working the minimum wage employees.
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  • anyone with any advice please email me: khladu@comcast.net
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  • So what's a healthy, passionate, experienced woman to do who has so much to offer to the job market, who could make such a difference in the lives of so many to do? I am frustrated beyond belief.
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  • @Jackie Cesnik Hi Jackie, I lost one part time teaching position when the Catholic School closed in 2009, I lost the public school part time position when I was interviewed by 6 administrators who had never reviewed me in the classroom ( the administrators who had, for over 2 years were on their way to another position and not invited for their input and on maternity leave respectively), I lost the position to a district employee who had certification in the field but had never been in front of an Art Classroom. Later at a conference, I saw her, was introduced to her by my former co-teacher with whom I had a great relationship, and the woman burst into tears and apologized for "taking my job". I replied that the district must have chosen the most suitable candidate for the position and asked why she was crying when I was the one without a job? so this is my segue into her I am looking at turning 60 on March 8, 2016, taking 100$ a day substitute jobs in districts that use Jobulator services to get substitutes therefore it is a race to the phone or computer to click on the button and MAYBE get the job before the other 400 subs take it. I am no quitter, I have sustained myself through these past 6 years wtih private instruction which unfortunately fell off when we were flooded by Hurricane Sandy, I have worked as the housekeeper for my local church, cleaned houses, babysat, developed a line of products and successfully marketed them until my business partner stole my ideas and was belligerent enough to not want to make a reasonable settlement. No use using lawyers for such a small business. I sound like a melodrama. I am just angry. I have given up on teaching jobs. I have qualified for a training from the state for which I was not able to choose the courses I knew would boost my business and ability to better able market my art and products because the state has to approve the programs they think are right. So I sat for 3 months learning HTML coding so i could design website when all I wanted was to be proficient in Photoshop so I could work with a photographer or at least do my own work better. I am at the end of my rope. I don't know whether it is because I live in NJ or whether I have been out of the workforce for over 5 years or just nepotistic hiring. Why just the other day a principal whom I have known and who respects me greatly, interviewed me for a maternity leave art teaching position in a school where I had the respect and backing of at least 5 teachers, where my daughter went to high school, a school who values people who work in their fields and at the end of the interview which lasted an hour, she told me that she would send all her notes to the BOE office and that hopefully I would hear from them next but that her hands were tied, despite the fact that I would be reporting directly to her, and that she had to take the teacher the BOE told her to take. I knew then that I didn't get the position and in this world, we don't even get a curt email saying that I wasn't hired from the BOE.
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How To Thrive After Losing Your Job

  1. BROUGHT TO YOU BYAdvice from the women of Connect: Professional Women’s NetworkLaid Off? How to Flourish, Not Flounder
  2. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 2Make a plan. First, a survival plan. Can you pay basic bills? Whatdo you need to do in the short term to get by? Then, a long-termplan. What do you want to do with your life? If there are changesyou need to make to feel you are on YOUR path, not one someoneelse designed for you, this is the ideal time to make them.Diane GallagherPit Stop Pain Relief atRossitor for Racers
  3. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 3Work with a career coach to evaluate your options and rework yourresume. I was surprised by how much of my experience wastransferable to other disciplines. The coach I worked with gave megreat advice for editing and tailoring my resume to get it through theHR systems, past the recruiter, and in front of hiring managers.Jessica JohannesSenior CommunicationsProfessional
  4. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 4A friend in HR offered this advice: 1) Build a weekly routine thatincludes coffee/exploratory conversations with colleagues to shareyour enthusiasm for a new chapter. 2) Create a strong two-pagerésumé that features your skills as a professional who is open tonew opportunities. 3) Stay healthy: Exercise and eat well.Joanne VenaArts EducationProgram Designer
  5. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 5I survived a brutal layoff after 9/11, and my sweet spot now ishelping women reinvent themselves. My top three tips: 1) Figure outwhat you REALLY want to do in this next chapter. 2) Don’t jump toanything until you research whats right for you. 3) Learn the lessonsyour life has been trying to teach you..Kathy CaprinoWomen’s Leadership andCareer Coach
  6. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 6I have been laid off four times in as many years. My three top tips:Keep connected in your field, learn something new, and network.That is how my current position and I met.Patricia NelsonKFAI - Fresh Air Radio
  7. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 7You’re never too old to learn new tricks. Make your time off countwith classes and certifications. Want to collaborate with those whohave diverse skill sets? Classes can help you learn to speak theirlanguage and devise strategies for partnering to benefit you both.Certifications can help you sharpen the tools in your own toolbox..Kathy CatoeMarketer with apassion for social media
  8. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 8Being laid off was the VERY BEST thing to ever happen to mycareer. Here are my top three pieces of advice. 1: Do at least onething that you have not been able to make time for. 2: Get endorsedby your former coworkers/update your social-media profiles. 3:Consider part-time and freelance positions or projects.Jessica McGuireOSteenCertified Salesforce.comSales Cloud Consultant
  9. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2013 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 9FLICKR PHOTO CREDITS:Slide 1: hlkljgkSlide 2: Christina DuludeSlide 3: Penn StateSlide 4: SangudoSlide 5: Thompson RiversSlide 6: itupicturesSlide 7: walthampubliclibrarySlide 8: Steve & Jemma CopleyJoin the conversation!Connect: Professional Women’s Network, Powered by Citi, is anonline community on LinkedIn that helps women achieve thecareers they want and discuss the issues relevant to their success.For more great insights from Connect members, check out thediscussion: What are your top three tips for women goingthrough a layoff?Visit linkedin.com/womenconnect formore information and to join the group!
  10. CONNECT: PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK©2012 LinkedIn Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 10

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