2010 W C S Policies

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Student Handbook of Policies and Procedures

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2010 W C S Policies

  1. 1. 101st Season 93 Camp School Road Wolfeboro, NH 03894-0390 TEL: (603) 569-3451 FAX: (603) 569-4080 E-mail: school@wolfeboro.org www.wolfeboro.org Season For Success
  2. 2. Wolfeboro 101st Season The Summer Boarding School Since 1910 Season For Success Policies& Procedures STUDENT HANDBOOK FOR 2010
  3. 3. 101st Season Season For Success Individual Goals • Support Accountability • Structure Encouragement • Success
  4. 4. 1 AN IMPOR TANT MESSAGE TO STUDENTS & PARENTS T he purpose of Wolfeboro’s policies and procedures is to assure an environment of respect and responsibility for self, for others, and for the welfare of the community as a whole. Within such a positive framework the individualized objectives established for each student are best met and the healthy and productive Wolfeboro Experience best preserved. Application for admission implies a commitment from both student and parent. Wolfeboro expects the student to arrive with a thorough understanding of this Handbook’s contents and a commitment to comply. Parents are also expected to be knowledgeable about Wolfeboro’s policies and procedures and committed to entering a partnership with the School in endorsing and supporting them. While this Handbook provides an overview of policies and procedures, it cannot cover every detail or individual situation. The Head of School will be pleased to respond to any question or concern not addressed within. Wolfeboro
  5. 5. 2 POLICIES & PROCEDURES TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ACADEMICS.................................................................................. ...4 Teaching and Extra Help.....................................................................4 Learning and Studying ........................................................................5 Daytime Session.............................................................................5 Evening Session...................................................................... .......5 Grades and Reports.............................................................................6 Planbooks............................................................................................6 Final Examination................................................................................6 ACTIVITIES......................................................................................7 WLM Program.....................................................................................7 (Water, Land and Mountains — required for students 14 and under) MAPS Program...................................................................................8 (Mountains, Arts, Physical Fitness and Safety — required for students ages 15 and 16).....................................................................8 SAE Program ......................................................................................8 (Seventeen and Eighteen — required for students ages 17 and 18) Intramural Sports (required for all students)........................................9 Swimming and Sailing..........................................................................9 Lifeguard Training...............................................................................9 Tennis....................................................................................... ........10 Fall Sports Training...........................................................................10 Aerobics............................................................................................ 10 Art.............................................................................................. ......10 Weekends.................................................................................. ........11 Religious Services..............................................................................11 HEALTH AND SAFETY .............................................................12 Medical Staff and Facilities.................................................................12 Student Medications..........................................................................12 Student Physical Examination............................................................12 Injury, Sickness, Emergency...............................................................13 Waterfront Safety...............................................................................13 Other Safety Concerns........................................................................ 3 1 Special Dietary Concerns...................................................................13 Wolfeboro
  6. 6. 3 POLICIES & PROCEDURES TABLE OF CONTENTS Page STUDENT EXPECTATIONS...................................................14 Academic Honesty.............................................................................14 Orientation.......................................................................................14 Attendance and Punctuality...............................................................14 Respect, Privacy, and Restrictions......................................................14 Appearance.................................................................................... ...15 Work Assignments .............................................................................15 Tent Inspection.................................................................................15 Alcohol and Drugs............................................................................16 Tobacco........................................................................................ ....16 Respect for Property..........................................................................16 Radios and Music Players..................................................................16 . Automobiles......................................................................................17 Off-Campus Expectations..................................................................17 Visitors and Weekend Leaves.............................................................17 Final Week.........................................................................................17 THE DINING ROOM..................................................................18 SERVICES.........................................................................................19 Student Accounts and Allowances ......................................................19 School Store......................................................................................19 Security of Valuables..........................................................................19 Laundry and Linens...........................................................................19 Parent-Student Communications - Telephone....................................20 Fax, Mail, Cell Phones, E-mail and Internet Access............................21 Personal Computers...........................................................................21 FOR PARENTS...............................................................................22 Preparing for Wolfeboro....................................................................22 Accommodations...............................................................................22 Local Car Services.............................................................................22 Directions by Car.............................................................................. 23 Wolfeboro
  7. 7. 4 ACADEMICS W olfeboro’s raison d’être is academics. Every effort is made to ascertain each student’s individual academic goals and to design and implement a program to meet those goals. Each student is required to carry a full academic schedule. The Head of School and Academic Dean are responsible for coordinating each student’s academic program with schools, consultants and parents. Teaching and Extra Help Of the teachers’ many responsibilities, none is more important than ensuring that: (1) each student learns each lesson well each day, (2) each assignment is completed to the fullest extent of the student’s ability, and (3) each assignment is completed when due. Teachers require an immediate response from any student whose work for a given day is incomplete or unsatisfactory. For example, a student with a few math problems incomplete or a composition poorly written is required to finish the problems and rewrite the composition during his or her next unscheduled time segment and return the work immediately to the teacher. There are many opportunities for students to get extra help. Since classes are small, teachers can have students from other sections in or near the classroom working on lessons while a different group is being taught. Thus, a student can get extra help by remaining after class or by returning to the classroom during an unscheduled period. The time directly before and after meals is also a good time for extra help sessions. Students are encouraged to seek extra help on their own initiative. When they do not, teachers take the initiative to see a student at the very first opportunity. Since both teachers and students live on or near the campus, it is always possible for academic work to be completed on a timely basis. Teachers do their part to assure that students achieve this goal, and the students’ complete cooperation is expected in this partnership. Wolfeboro
  8. 8. 5 ACADEMICS Learning and Studying An academic atmosphere is maintained throughout the School during the daytime academic session and evening study periods. Daytime Session The daytime academic session is from 8:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. when students are in one of four places: (1) in an assigned class (2) with a teacher getting extra help or working on a lesson (3) working in a Study Hall at the request of a teacher (4) in their tents under residential staff supervision, engaged in productive activity such as preparing a lesson, reading, resting, or writing a letter. Evening Session The evening study period is from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. with an 8:30 p.m. fifteen-minute break. Based on individual need, students spend the study periods in a Study Hall or in their tents under close staff supervision. Most students are assigned to one of three Study Halls, each of which is well supervised by a faculty member. Study Hall structure includes the following key points: (1) Students are expected to arrive promptly and fully prepared to work productively and independently for the entire period. (2) Students remain in assigned seats throughout the period. (3) Food and beverages are not allowed. (4) Quiet and sustained student productivity is insured. Wolfeboro
  9. 9. 6 ACADEMICS The structure has proven to be beneficial in many ways. It provides uninter- rupted focus on the task at hand. Requiring students to work independently for at least one hour teaches and fosters good study habits including planning ahead, being organized and prepared, and appreciating the wisdom of seeking extra help during the many times it is available. Evening Study Hall assignments are revised weekly based on the Thursday grade reports. Grades and Reports Grades and written reports are submitted by teachers and residential staff each Thursday morning and are distributed to students at 12:30 p.m. the same day. These weekly reports are not sent home by the School. Students may keep a copy of reports or send a copy home. Parents receive comprehensive reports from each teacher at the end of the third full week. Final teacher reports are mailed to parents a few days following the close of school. A comprehensive summary report is sent to parents within the two weeks preceding Labor Day. Planbooks During orientation, each student is issued a planbook — a valuable and required tool for teaching and learning. Students use the planbook to record and organize assignments and schedule their study time. Faculty and staff regularly review the planbooks to assist students in using them productively and to monitor the students’ study activities and progress. Final Examinations Students will have examinations during the final Thursday, Friday and Saturday of the session. Any student departing prior to a scheduled examination will not have the option to take the examination early. Wolfeboro
  10. 10. 7 ACTIVITIES T he non-academic program is an integral part of The Wolfeboro Experience and contributes to and supports the educational objectives established for each student. The program is designed to expose students to a wide variety of activities, including water and field sports, tennis, basketball, camping, studio art, weight training, weekend trips to movies, mountains, amusement and water parks, and other places of interest. In addition to required activities delineated in this section, other activities may be required for certain groups, depending on need or interest. For activity purposes, the age of a student is determined by the student’s age on July 15th. Water, Land and Mountain Program (WLM) (Required for all 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 year old students) A. Required for students 14 and under. B. At the discretion of the School, certain 15-year-old students may have a WLM requirement as opposed to a MAPS requirement. The WLM Program is specially designed to provide the youngest students with a variety of experiences utilizing the School’s and the surrounding area’s natural resources. The structured daily sessions focus on teaching skills as well as fostering physical fitness. WLM participants are organized into five groups, and each group rotates through one week of each of the following activities. (During the sixth week, the five groups participate in activities together.) (1) New Hampshire Hiking — daily activities designed to prepare students for local day hikes in the Lakes Region or nearby White Mountains. (2) Swimming and Water Safety — four one-hour sessions. (3) Sailing and Canoeing — four one-hour sessions. (4) Physical Fitness — a variety of exercise activities. (5) Camp Sports — a variety of group sports. Wolfeboro
  11. 11. 8 ACTIVITIES Mountain, Arts, Physical Fitness and Safety Program (MAPS) (Required for all 15 to 16 year old students) MAPS is required for students 15 and 16. At the discretion of the School, certain 15-year-old students may have a WLM requirement as opposed to a MAPS requirement. The MAPS Program requires participation in each of the following three activities: (1) New Hampshire Hiking — daily activities designed to prepare students for local day hikes in the Lakes Region or nearby White Mountains. (2) Safety/Art — each student selects a two-week, eight-hour course in either: Standard First Aid with CPR or Basic Water Rescue or Studio Art (3) Sports — each student selects a two-week, eight-hour program of either (a) Fall Sports Training or (b) Sports Option: (a) Fall Sports Training To prepare for sports such as football, soccer, cross country or field hockey. Activities include weight training, running, flexibility and agility drills. or (b) Sports Options Select one or two sports from the following list. If two sports are selected, each will meet for one week. A single sport selection will meet for two weeks. Each sport will include drill and instruction. Sport Options: Basketball, Softball, Soccer, Tennis, Volleyball. Other options may include Aerobics and Jogging. Students have the option to attend supplementary sessions of art, Fall Sports Training and a variety of sports on a regular basis. Students enrolled in Lifeguard Training are exempt from (2) and (3). Wolfeboro
  12. 12. 9 ACTIVITIES Seventeen and Eighteen (SAE) (Required for all 17 and 18 year old students) 1. New Hampshire Hiking _ daily activities designed to prepare students for local day hikes in the Lakes Region or nearby White Mountains. 2. In addition, Students must _ participate for at least one hour in an activity of their choice. Most available options are listed in this handbook. FOR ALL STUDENTS Intramural Sports (Required Attendance for All Students.) Intramural sports are the core of the School’s Physical Education Program. Students are divided into two leagues-- one league for students approxi- mately 15 and younger; one for 16 and older. Each league consists of six teams with two coaches per team. Daily activities include volleyball, softball, soccer and basketball; the waterfront and playing fields host a variety of other intramural team activities. Most games are played between supper and evening study (6:40 p.m. to 7:20 p.m.). Swimming / Boating During orientation all students are given a swimming test, and non-swim- mers are assigned to a swimming class. An optional basic sailing test is also given. Students seeking sailing proficiency are given the opportunity for sailing instruction. Both swimming and sailing are included in the WLM Program for all students 14 and younger. In addition, all students have the opportunity to use canoes and kayaks on a regular basis. Lifeguard Training (Optional for Older Students.) A 35-hour Red Cross Lifeguard Training course is offered to students with competent swimming skills; the course meets most afternoons. Students who successfully complete the course receive Red Cross Lifeguard Certification as well as Adult CPR and Standard First Aid certification. This is a fee-based course; related costs are applied to the student’s personal expense account. By special request, a 15-year-old may be considered for the course. Wolfeboro
  13. 13. 10 ACTIVITIES Tennis Optional tennis instruction is available two hours a week. In addition, courts are available for recreational play during most non-academic times. Fall Sports Training A one-hour training program, three or four days per week, is an option for students preparing for sports such as football, soccer, cross country or field hockey. Activities include weight training, running, flexibility and agility drills. Aerobics A one-hour aerobics program, three or four days per week, is an option for any student. Studio Art In addition to being an option within the MAPS Program for students age 15 and 16, Studio Art courses to include painting, drawing and sculpture are open to all students each week. Wolfeboro
  14. 14. 11 ACTIVITIES Weekends Extensive weekend activities begin following the noon meal on Saturdays. While some groups of students are away on overnight camping trips, all others will participate in trips to nearby recreational areas, the seashore, the movies, or other places of interest. Trips often include stops at a favorite restaurant. The cost of most weekend trips is charged to the student’s personal account. Religious Services Many religious denominations are represented in the Town of Wolfeboro and the surrounding area. Transportation is provided to students wishing to attend services during the weekend. Wolfeboro
  15. 15. 12 HEALTH AND SAFETY Medical Staff and Facilities The ratio of students to staff enables Wolfeboro to place top priority on health and safety. The School is fortunate to have a large, fully-equipped hospital within two miles of the School. Students are under the direct supervision of a local physician. A registered nurse is on duty at all times and is available in the Health Center around mealtime to attend to routine medical concerns. The nurse arranges for all outside medical care including transportation to the doctor or hospital. The School’s physician is available to see students in his office on a daily basis in the early afternoon as well as being on-call for any emergencies. Student Medications The Health Center is well stocked with all the usual medications and supplies; parents and students are asked to please leave the “medicine chest” at home. Only prescription medications and the doctor’s written order for their dispensing should be brought to the School. NOTE: The School’s policy strictly prohibits possession of any steroid-type substance to include “protein powders.” Both parents and physician must complete the required medical forms and return them to the School before the specified June deadline. Students are responsible for reporting to medical personnel at the designated times for daily medications without prodding by staff. Failure to comply with physician’s directions or abuse of any medication constitutes cause for dismissal. Student Physical Examination A physician-signed Physical Examination and Permission to Treat Form must be submitted to the School before Opening Day. These forms are required for residency at Wolfeboro. Forms will be mailed in early spring as part of our supplementary information packet and will also be available on the School’s website at www.wolfeboro.org. Wolfeboro
  16. 16. 13 HEALTH AND SAFETY Injury, Sickness, Emergency Student orientation includes instructing students on procedures to follow in the event of an injury, illness, or emergency. They are instructed to immediately notify a staff member, not move the student and not attempt any kind of first aid unless there is absolutely no alternative. They are also instructed to not leave the ill or injured student alone until properly trained medical assistance arrives. Waterfront Safety The waterfront is intended for safe recreation. To ensure this, the School adheres to judicious safety precautions. Students may swim, boat or go onto the docks only during authorized times and with proper supervision. Swimming times and boating times are clearly announced and posted each morning. Other Safety Concerns For obvious reason, students may not possess knives of any kind or any other item that might cause harm or damage. Although aerosols and glass containers are not permitted, students may possess shaving gel as well as ‘pump spray’ products such as insect repellent. Special Dietary Concerns Wolfeboro proudly and firmly adheres to a pleasant, seated, family-style dining room format with a set menu. Accordingly, the school is not prepared to meet special dietary requests, but several healthy food options are available at each meal. Wolfeboro
  17. 17. 14 S T U D E N T E X P E C TAT I O N S E nrolling at Wolfeboro implies a sincerity of purpose and a sense of responsibility. While an attentive and supportive staff provides every opportunity for a student to succeed, the School is steadfast in holding students accountable. Students must be willing, able, and committed to abide by the School’s policies, not only to assure a positive experience for themselves, but to assure the welfare of the School as a community. Respect and responsibility for self, for others, and for the community as a whole are keynotes to Wolfeboro’s philosophy. The School reserves the right to dismiss any student at any time for violation of rules and regulations or whose behavior has a negative influence on the positive spirit of The Wolfeboro Experience. Academic Honesty It is assumed that all students will practice scholastic integrity at all times. Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. Orientation Several orientation sessions are held during the first few days of school. Upon arrival, each student is given a campus map, a student and staff roster, a statement of Dining Room manners, procedures for Study Hall, procedures for waiters and waitresses, individual academic schedules, and the Student Handbook of Policies and Procedures. Parents can be assured that all students will be constantly directed and supervised at all times. Attendance and Punctuality All scheduled classes, meals, appointments, and assigned activities are considered mandatory commitments and are expected to be attended with promptness. Respect, Privacy, and Restrictions Students are expected to be fully respectful of faculty, staff, and other students at all times. Respect for self and others includes the absence of bullying, theft, all forms of harassment, to include verbal abuse, inapropriate physical contact, or improper demonstration of affection or attention as well as language not deemed to be respectful or in good taste. Wolfeboro
  18. 18. 15 S T U D E N T E X P E C TAT I O N S Students are expected to remain on campus at all times except when leaving campus is scheduled, accompanied by staff, or approved by the School. Girls and boys must respect the absolute privacy of each others residential areas. No boy may ever enter the girls’ residential area, and no girl may ever enter the boys’ residential area. Girls and boys remain on their respective residential campuses between lights out at 10:00 p.m. and 7:05 a.m. Appearance Students are expected to maintain a clean and neat appearance. Bizarre, torn, ill-fitting or otherwise inappropriate dress is not permitted. Clothing must be devoid of offensive language or symbolism. No visible body pierc- ing is permitted with the exception of earrings for females. Facial hair is not permitted. Boys’ hair must be kept well-groomed and above collar length; girls’ and boys’ hair will be in keeping with traditional styles. Judgments regarding student appearance are made by the Dean of Residential Life, the Heads of the respective residential campuses and, as appropriate, by medical personnel. Work Assignments All students assist in maintaining a neat and clean school by keeping their own tents and tent areas clean and organized and by spending approxi- mately twenty minutes a day helping with such chores as sweeping classrooms or the Dining Room. Most students are also responsible for a nine-day assignment waiting on tables in the Dining Room. Tent Inspection Students’ tents are expected to be neat at all times. Each student’s tent is inspected on a daily basis before the first academic period and on Sundays before activities. Beds are to be made and clothes and belongings arranged and stored in an orderly manner. The floor must be swept and the tent area free of litter. Examination of any tent and personal belongings may be made at any time when authorized by the Head of School. A staff member will be authorized to examine a tent only when reasonable evidence or circumstances suggest such a need. Except in special circumstances, the staff member will be accompanied by at least one of the tent’s occupants. Wolfeboro
  19. 19. 16 S T U D E N T E X P E C TAT I O N S Tent Inspection (Continued) This policy does not preclude examinations by a member of the staff alone if the situation warrants. Alcohol and Drugs Possession, transportation or use of alcoholic beverages, illegal drugs of any kind including prescription medication, or apparatus clearly intended for the use of drugs will result in immediate dismissal. It is assumed that no student will abuse any substance of any kind, including prescription medications. NOTE: Dismissal may also result from other inappropriate student behavior. Tobacco The School does not foster or support any activity which is detrimental to the health and safety of its students. For this reason, no student is permitted to use tobacco in any form or manner. Parents should not seek admission for a student unwilling or unable to comply with this policy. Respect for Property Theft of or damage to property of another individual or of the School is cause for serious disciplinary action. The cost of willful damage to School property will be charged to a student’s personal account. The School is not responsible for student’s personal clothing or other possesions. All possessions must be clearly marked with the student’s name. NOTE: Inappropriate items of any kind confiscated from students will not be returned. Radios and Music Players Students may have audio equipment such as ipods for use only in residential tents and on trips. Use is restricted to appropriate times of the day and at volumes which will not distract from other students’ wishes to read, study or relax without disturbance. Please note that the use of headphones is limited to the student’s residential tent and off-campus trips. Due to risks inherent in an outdoor setting, ie: weather, older or ‘backup’ ipods are recommended. Wolfeboro
  20. 20. 17 S T U D E N T E X P E C TAT I O N S Automobiles Students are not permitted to have automobiles at the School, nor are students allowed to drive or ride in any vehicle without the express knowledge and consent of the School. Off-Campus Expectations All policies regarding student behavior apply to students when they are off- campus on school-sponsored activities and trips or otherwise considered to be under the egis and responsibility of the School. Visitors and Weekend Leaves With prior arrangements by parents, students may travel to and from campus with an adult member of the family (over the age of 25) after the final class on Saturday and return by 5:30 p.m. on Sunday. Students may not take another student for an overnight stay but may do so for a day visit and/or dinner provided the School receives 24 hour advanced approval of the parents of both the host and guest. For students who reside outside the United States or whose parents may not be readily available, the Head of School may act on the parents’ behalf in granting permission for weekend leaves. NOTE: Weekends 2,3,4 and 5 are designed as “open” weekends for both visitation and overnight purposes. The first and final weekends (1 and 6) are designed as “closed” weekends with regard to both visitors and permission to leave campus. In addition, a student may not take a weekend on which a mandatory camping trip is scheduled. Students may not have visits from peers at any time. Parents are welcome to visit at any time. Parents are requested to notify the School prior to visiting so that their visit is not disruptive to normal school operation or a student’s specific obligations. Final Week The School does not permit visitors or student leaves during the final week of school. Visitations and leaves can be a distraction as students prepare for exams and as we all work to solidify The Wolfeboro Experience. We trust that parents will support us in our endeavor to maximize every student’s opportunity to succeed. Wolfeboro
  21. 21. 18 THE DINING ROOM A separate section of this Handbook is devoted to the Dining Room because it is an important part of Wolfeboro’s total program. Good eating habits and a positive experience within the Dining Room are high priorities. Considerable time and energy are expended to make mealtimes a socially bonding and enjoyable learning experience for everyone. In short, the Dining Room sets the tone for The Wolfeboro Experience. The structure, ambience and emphasis on good manners in the Dining Room support the educational goals of the overall program. Women are seated upon arrival, and men remain standing until the Head of School and Dean of Residential Life are seated. A non-denominational grace is said and all announcements made before waiters proceed to the kitchen. Dining Room tables seat eight to ten people. Students are assigned to a specific table, and seating assignments are changed every nine days to preclude any two students from being seated together more than once. All students are required to attend all meals. Nearly all students wait on their assigned table for one seating period and are trained and supervised by the Dining Room Manager. Each table is headed by an experienced member of the staff, and a second member of the staff sits at the other end of the table and functions as Assistant Table Head. Staff members’ families are also at the table. The Head of the Table serves the food, directs the waiter, and is responsible for attendance, manners, and fostering meaningful conversation. Wolfeboro
  22. 22. 19 SERVICES Student Accounts and Allowances An individual account is set up for each student beginning with the deposit required upon acceptance to cover books, supplies, weekly allowances, incidental expenses and costs of optional weekend trips and/or activities. A $15.00 allowance is distributed weekly. The student must take the full amount or none at all — they may not forego one week’s allowance and receive a double allowance the next week. The School is basically a non-cash community. Parents are asked not to send additional cash to students. Cash is needed only for the soda machine and occasional trips to town. School Store The Store is located in the Student Center and carries books, academic supplies and various sundries in addition to personal items students may need on a day-to-day basis. Store purchases are charged to the student’s personal account. Security of Valuables The School is not responsible for student’s personal clothing or other posses- sions. All possessions must be clearly marked with the student’s name. Students are strongly urged to leave valuable items such as jewelry and other cherished possessions at home. Students will be asked to bring passports, plane tickets, money or other valuables to the Johnson Center immediately upon arrival. These items are tagged, securely stored, and returned at the end of session or released during the session as appropriate. *Confiscated items such as aerosol products and glass containers will not be returned. Laundry and Linens Upon arrival, students are issued a laundry bag, two sheets, a pillow case, and one blanket. A student may bring a pillow or purchase a pillow at the School Store. The cost for the laundry and linen service is charged to the student’s personal account and the accounts are charged for lost items. Student laundry is picked up and returned weekly. All clothing must be clearly marked. Wolfeboro
  23. 23. 20 SERVICES Parent - Student Communications Telephone Public telephones are provided on the boys’ and girls’ campuses for out- going calls only during designated times. The telephones are intended for students to call parents and family and not for lengthy conversations with peers. A one-time flat fee is charged to the student expense account for personal telephone use and covers all student calls for the entire session. NOTE: Mandatory activities might prohibit a student’s access to a public telephone. Parents are urged to keep conversations brief and to be sensitive to the student’s program obligations. Students may place a call home via campus telephones as follows: Monday - Saturday: 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday: 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please be aware that most students are enjoying off-campus activities on Saturdays and Sundays. Parents cannot reach students via the public telephones as they do not service incoming calls. Parents may phone the School office between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. to leave a message for the student to return the call at an appropriate time. In some instances, students may not be able to return the call until the following day and often not at the specific time requested by a parent. NOTE: 1) In the interest of good education, it is the School’s policy not to interrupt a student’s schedule for telephone calls or messages except in dire emergencies. 2) Students will not have access to public telephones during the first week of the session. Daily access to on-campus telephones will begin near the end of the first full week of classes. Wolfeboro
  24. 24. 21 SERVICES Parent - Student Communications (Continued) FAX A FAX machine is available for use by parents and students for either incoming or outgoing messages. Students from overseas find communica- tions by FAX very convenient since messages can be received during the night and returned the following day without concern for time differences. There is a small charge for outgoing FAX transmissions. Mail Mailboxes for student outgoing mail are located in the Dining Rooms. Mail is taken to town each morning, and incoming mail is distributed daily at “mail call” at 5:15 p.m. Package arrival notices are issued with the mail, and parcels are claimed at the School Store. Cell Phones, E-mail and Internet Access Students are not permitted to have cell phones of any kind to include any device which contains telephone capabilities. In addition, students do not have access to e-mail services or the internet. A clarification of the School’s policy on students traveling to or from the School with cell phones is provided to families via our supplementary information publication. This information is also available in the spring through our website at www.wolfeboro.org. Personal Computers In general, computers are not permitted. From an academic standpoint, it is the school’s belief that academic progress to include abilities in written expression is maximized over the course of our six and one-half week session without the use or distraction of computer technology. By special permission, a laptop computer may be permitted for academic purposes only. Permission to bring and use a laptop must be obtained from the Academic Dean. Any laptop which becomes a distraction to the student or other students will be confiscated and returned home. *Unauthorized computers will be shipped home at the family’s expense. Wolfeboro
  25. 25. 22 FOR PARENTS Preparing for Wolfeboro In early spring, parents are provided with supplemental information to include transportation information, medical forms, “What to Bring” and all other information needed to prepare the student for the session. This information will also be available for download at www.wolfeboro.org. Most students traveling by air arrive at Manchester (New Hampshire) Airport or Boston’s Logan Airport on Opening Day and are met by members of the School staff. Chartered buses transport students to Wolfeboro. More specific information about travel to and from Wolfeboro is provided at the time of acceptance. Incidental Travel Parents are responsible for funding of all incidental travel to and from campus. The school is pleased to provide assistance with travel arrangements if requested. Local Car Services are available for airport transportation, as well as travel to other destinations. Local Car Services Winnipesaukee Livery 603/569-3189 Feliciano Limousine, LLC 603/332-3641 Accommodations The Town of Wolfeboro and the Lakes Region of New Hampshire, in general, is a popular summer resort area. Parents planning to visit should make reservations as soon as possible. The following is a partial list of local accommodations. Additional local information is available at www.wolfeboro.com and www.wolfeborochamber.com. The Wolfeboro Inn 603/569-3016 The Lakeview Inn 603/569-1335 The Lake Motel 603/569-1100 Piping Rock Motel & Cottages 603/569-1915 Bayside Motel (Alton) 603/875-5005 B. Mae’s Resort Inn (Gilford) 603/293-7526 The Margate Resort (Gilford) 603/524-5210 Lake Opechee Inn and Spa (Laconia) 603/524-0111 The Inn and Spa at Mills Falls (Meredith) 603/279-7006 The Inn at Church Landing (Meredith) 800/622-6455 Wolfeboro
  26. 26. 23 FOR PARENTS Directions by Car FROM BOSTON - 2 hours Interstate 95 North to Portsmouth, NH. Route 16 (Spaulding Turnpike) Northwest to Rochester, NH - take Exit 15. Route 11 to Alton traffic circle at intersection of Route 28. Route 28 North toward Wolfeboro - 9.8 miles. Turn right (135 degrees) onto Pleasant Valley Road and travel about 1/2 a mile. Look for a gravel road bearing right into a wooded area. The road is marked with the School sign. OR Take Interstate 93 North to Exit 9 - Manchester, NH, Route 28. Route 28 North to Alton traffic circle - continue on Route 28 North toward Wolfeboro - 9.8 miles. Turn right (135 degrees) onto Pleasant Valley Road and travel about 1/2 a mile. Look for a gravel road bearing right into a wooded area. The road is marked with the School sign. FROM WESTCHESTER COUNTY, NY - 6 hours Interstate 684 North to Brewster, NY. Interstate 84 through Hartford, CT to Massachusetts Turnpike, Route 90. Massachusetts Turnpike to Route 495, Exit 11A. Route 495 North to Route 93, Exit 40. Route 93 North to Exit 9 - Manchester, NH, Route 28. Route 28 North to Alton traffic circle - continue on Route 28 North toward Wolfeboro - 9.8 miles. Turn right (135 degrees) onto Pleasant Valley Road and travel about 1/2 a mile. Look for a gravel road bearing right into a wooded area. The road is marked with the School sign. NOTE: GPS and online map programs may not provide accurate local directions. Drivers are urged to follow the directions written above when approaching the town of Wolfeboro. Wolfeboro
  27. 27. 24 NOTES Wolfeboro
  28. 28. Wolfeboro

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