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2010 Course Book

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Course Offerings for 2010

Course Offerings for 2010

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  • 1. 101st Season 93 Camp School Road P.O. Box 390 Wolfeboro, NH 03894-0390 TEL: (603) 569-3451 FAX: (603) 569-4080 E-mail: school@wolfeboro.org www.wolfeboro.org Season For Success
  • 2. Wolfeboro The Summer Boarding School 101st Season Since 1910 Season For Success Course Book ACADEMIC PROGRAM & ADMISSION FOR 2010
  • 3. Since 1910 a summer on the shore of Rust Pond has meant a "Season For Success" for thousands of young people. Wolfeboro
  • 4. 1 Course Book Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t s TABLE OF CONTENTS 101st Season 2009 Administration and Faculty.........................................2 2009 Residential Staff and Board of Directors.....................3 Independent Schools Represented........................................4 Program of Studies..............................................................6 Middle School Courses........................................................8 Upper School Courses.........................................................8 Course Descriptions.............................................................9 Reading...............................................................................9 Written Expression.............................................................10 Literature...........................................................................12 Science...............................................................................13 SAT Preparation.................................................................13 History..............................................................................14 Mathematics.......................................................................15 Foreign Language..............................................................16 English as a Second Language...........................................17 Admission..........................................................................18 School Facts.......................................................................19 Life At School Wolfeboro
  • 5. WOLFEBORO: THE SUMMER BOARDING SCHOOL 2 ADMINISTRATION Edward Cooper, Head of School William Cooper, Corporate Manager Alphonse Orio, Sr., Dean of Residential Life Wolfeboro, NH Wolfeboro, NH Deptford Township High School Appointed: 1978 Appointed: 1967 Deptford, NJ Appointed: 1982 Laura Cooper, Dean of Faculty Joyce Ferris, Academic Dean Brewster Academy Wolfeboro, NH Peter Orio, Director of Student Activities Wolfeboro, NH Appointed: 2005 Monongahela Junior High School Appointed: 1979 Sewell, NJ Appointed: 1985 FACULTY Patricia Alonso Schaft, Spanish Torey Davie, English Bradley Jarvis, ESL Robert Piazza, English Rutland High School Wyoming Seminary Yanbu International School Hamden Hall Country Day School Rutland, VT Kingston, PA Saudia Arabia Hamden, CT Appointed: 1998 Appointed: 2008 Appointed: 2004 Appointed: 2008 Jack Bowers, Mathematics Edward Dobry, Reading Matthew Kearney III, English Kyle Reynolds, English Hill School Central Catholic High School Mercersburg Academy Brewster Academy Middleburg, VA Reading, PA Mercersburg, PA Wolfeboro, NH Appointed: 2007 Appointed: 1980 Appointed: 2000 Appointed: 2001 Sarkis Boyadjian, Mathematics Ellen Ferguson, English William Mandigo, Jr., Mathematics Roger Richard, History Westover School Montclair Kimberley Academy Middlebury College Morristown-Beard School Middlebury, CT Montclair, NJ Middlebury, VT Morristown, NJ Appointed: 2002 Appointed: 2007 Appointed: 1984 Appointed: 2007 Curtis Brown, Mathematics Larch Fidler, English William Mandigo, Sr., History Ted Schaft, Mathematics St. Mark’s School (retired) Morristown-Beard School Burrillville School District (retired) Woodstock Union High School Southborough, MA Morristown, NJ Harrisville, RI Woodstock, VT Appointed: 1967 Appointed: 2008 Appointed: 1992 Appointed: 2007 Susan Chiulli, English Robert Googins, English Peter Mann, French Kimberly Severance, Studio Art Woodstown Middle School Kingswood-Oxford School (retired) Brewster Academy Valley View Community School Woodstown, NJ West Hartford, CT Wolfeboro, NH Farmington, NH Appointed: 2008 Appointed: 1981 Appointed: 2001 Appointed: 2004 Daniel Chretien, Mathematics Tom Greenwood, English Frank Massey, English Beth Shiffler, Mathematics Winchendon School Episcopal Academy Bement School Fenn School Winchendon, MA Newton Square, PA Deerfield, MA Concord, MA Appointed: 2001 Appointed: 1999 Appointed: 2009 Appointed: 1997 Jim Connor, History Tom Herold, English Kevin McCarthy, History Timothy Stark, Latin Blair Academy Hotchkiss School Worcester Academy Harvey School Blairstown, NJ Lakeville, CT Worcester, MA Katonah, NY Appointed: 1991 Appointed: 2009 Appointed: 1996 Appointed: 1978 Mark Crawford, Science Anne Marie Hestnes-Harris, ESL Kathleen McLead, Mathematics Michael Sweeney, Mathematics Rye Country Day School Hartford Area Career & Tech Ctr. Upper Darby High School Mercersburg Academy Rye, NY White River Junction, VT Drexel Hill, PA Mercersburg, PA Appointed: 2009 Appointed: 1987 Appointed: 2005 Appointed: 2008 John Daly, Reading Barbara Jarvis, ESL Robert Merrifield, Science Hyun Cathy Yun, ESL Forman School Yanbu International School Blair Academy Walnut Hill School Litchfield, CT Saudia Arabia Blairstown, NJ Natick, MA Appointed: 2006 Appointed: 2004 Appointed: 2004 Appointed: 2009 Robert Parker, Summer Reading The Hill School Pottstown, PA Appointed: 1981 Wolfeboro
  • 6. WOLFEBORO: THE SUMMER BOARDING SCHOOL 3 RESIDENTIAL CAMPUS HEADS Peter Gaynor Jeff Mandigo Sara Parker Upper School - Boys Campus Head Middle School - Boys Campus Head Girls Campus Head Stoneleigh-Burnham School Salisbury School Naples, FL Greenfield, MA Salisbury, CT RESIDENTIAL LIFE STAFF Melanie Bozoian, RN Tracey Ferriter Sean Murphy Brian Small Health Center Director Williams College Chungdahm Learning Institute Rowan University Manchester Memorial High Williamstown, MA Hwaseong, South Korea Glassboro, NJ Manchester, NH Nathan Fisher Kathleen Nicholson Michael Small Philip Chaput Rowan University Assistant Campus Head Gloucester County College Thetford Academy Glassboro, NJ Kimball Union Academy Sewell, NJ Thetford, VT Meriden, NH Catherine Gaynor Michelle Smart Caitlin Connelly Waterfront Director/Summer Reading Al Orio, Jr. Assistant Campus Head Assistant Campus Head Stoneleigh-Burnham School Assistant Campus Head Springfield College Miss Porter’s School Greenfield, MA Perkiomen School Springfield, MA Farmington, CT Pennsburg, PA Larrissa Hoffman-Terry Michael Wetzler Daniel Cooper St. Lawrence University Raymond Orio St. Lawrence University Assistant Campus Head Canton, NY Lebanon Valley College Canton, NY Avon Old Farms School Annville, PA Avon, CT Tyler Kallen Natalie White Rochester Institute of Technology Kathleen Phelan Rivendell Academy Kimberly Cooper Rochester, NY Temple University Orford, NH St. Lawrence University Philadelphia, PA Canton, NY Colin Lantry David Woodley Middlebury College Mary Roseen Assistant Campus Head Hannah Corkery Middlebury, VT Camping Program Director Poly Prep Country Day School St. Lawrence University Miss Porter’s School Brooklyn, NY Canton, NY Fani Martines Farmington, CT Boston College Lani Wright Emily DeSimone Chestnut Hill, MA Rosa Rumery, RN Middlebury College Emerson College Assistant Nurse Middlebury, VT Boston, MA Tyler McDougold Wolfeboro, NH Mount Allison University Gaetan DeSimone Sackville, New Brunswick Tiffany Seigars, RN Marywood University Canada Assistant Nurse Scranton, PA Wolfeboro, NH BOARD OF DIRECTORS George K. Allison Edward A. Cooper Jennifer G. Haskell Ann Carol Price Frederick H. Wandelt III Pennsburg, PA Wolfeboro, NH Wolfeboro, NH Columbia, SC Watertown,CT Malcolm A. Borg William A. Cooper Daniel G. Lee, Jr. Eric G. Ruoss Hackensack, NJ Wolfeboro, NH Fryeburg, ME Wilmington, DE Wolfeboro
  • 7. INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS REPRESENTED IN 2009 4 Academy at Charlemont Escola Viva Miami Country Day School Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart Allendale Columbia School Far Hills Country Day School Midland School Tabor Academy American International School Fay School Miss Hall’s School Taft School American School Foundation Fessenden School Miss Porter’s School Taipei American School American School of Kuwait Forman School Morristown-Beard School Tec Milenio American School of London Foxcroft School Moscow Secondary School Tilton School Avon Old Farms School Frederica Academy Najd International School Town School Belen Jesuit Preparatory School Gould Academy Nanke International School Trevor Day School Bement School Governor’s Academy Newton Country Day School Trey Whitfield School Benjamin School Graded School Norfolk Academy Trinity-Pawling School Berkshire School Grandview Preparatory School Oldfields School Ursuline Academy Berwick Academy Grier School Palmer Trinity School Videdalskolan Blue Ridge School The Gunnery Perkiomen School Villa Maria Academy Brewster Academy Highland School Ransom Everglades School Washington Waldorf School Canadian International School The Hill School Rectory School Webb School (TN) Cardigan Mountain School HKUGA College Regent School Webb Schools (CA) Cheshire Academy Hoosac School Rivers School West Hill Institute Choate Rosemary Hall Horace Mann School Rocky Hill School Westmark School Christ School Hotchkiss School Rosarian Academy Westover School Colegio Internacional de Caracas Indian Mountain School Rumsey Hall School Wichita Collegiate School Colegio Navarrete Institut auf dem Rosenberg Runnels School Wilbraham & Monson Academy Colegio San Patricio Instituo San Carlo St. Bernard Academy Winpenny School Colegio Vista Hermosa International School of Turin Saint Edwards’ School Woodward Academy Commonwealth Academy Instituto Leone XIII St. James School Zurich International School Dar Al Fikr School Kent School St. John’s School Darlington School Kents Hill School St. Mark’s School Darrow School Kimball Union Academy St. Paul’s College Deerfield Academy La Lumiere School St. Stephen’s Episcopal School Delaware Valley Friends School Lake Forrest Country Day Salisbury School School Derryfield School Seattle Preparatory School Landheim Schondorf Dunham School Seoul International School Lawrence Academy E.F. International Academy Sierra Canyon School Lyford Cay International School Eagle Hill School Spring Street International School Lyndon Institute Ecole Benedict Stevenson School Maclay School Ecole Internationale Boston Steward School McLean School of Maryland Emery/Weiner School Stoneleigh-Burnham School Mercersburg Academy Storm King School NOTE: Boarding Schools noted in bold font. Wolfeboro
  • 8. 5 Wolfeboro
  • 9. PROGRAM OF STUDIES 6 Wolfebor o Cur riculum W ithin a college preparatory curriculum, Wolfeboro’s primary purpose is constructive scholastic work for girls and boys age 10 to 18 and entering grades 6 through 12. First and foremost, the program emphasizes effective and efficient study habits, study skills, organization, motivation and academic confidence. Course selection is best developed in consultation with Wolfeboro staff and, upon request, with the student’s school. Course decisions can be deferred until after acceptance and near the end of the current school year. In addition to taking courses for credit, courses are taken to: (1) Preview or Review specific academic courses. (2) Strengthen skills in all traditional subjects. Course Cr edit Every course can be taken for credit purposes; courses are taken for credit with written permission from the student’s school. Courses for credit are arranged in advance between Wolfeboro and the student’s school and can be designed to meet the specific requirements of the other school. Academic Schedule • All students are in class for 3 class periods per day. • Most students enroll in 3 different single-period subjects. • Full year credit courses often require a two-period class. • All courses meet for the entire session. • Middle School students have structured academic time four periods each morning - three class periods, one period of extra help or quiet study and one recreational break or extra help as needed. Two hours are dedicated to evening study activities. • Upper School students have structured academic time five periods each morning - three class periods and two periods of extra help or quiet study. Two hours are dedicated to evening study activities. Wolfeboro
  • 10. PROGRAM OF S T U D I E S Continued 7 Per for mance Evaluation A ll students earn at least one grade in each class every day. In general, all teachers administer a daily quiz and a weekly test. These assessments are graded and returned the same or next day. Examinations are given at the end of all courses. In those cases where a referring school requires their own exam be taken, the school submits a complete course outline and/or practice exam to Wolfeboro prior to the beginning of the session. Academic Suppor t and Accountability Extra help is required as needed each academic day. By policy, students remain supervised until each assignment is completed satisfactorily. A mandatory, structured, thoroughly supervised two-hour evening session is part of every student’s program. Evening study hall maximizes preparation for the next day as well as fosters sustained focus and independent productivity. Academic Repor ts and T ranscripts Teacher reports and grades are provided weekly to both the student and the Head of School. Parents receive comprehensive teacher reports at the mid-term and at the conclusion of the session. A comprehensive summary report is written by the Head of School or Academic Dean for each student and is sent to parents after the end of the session. At the parent’s request, an official school transcript and/or teachers reports will be sent to schools. Wolfeboro
  • 11. MIDDLE SCHOOL AND UPPER SCHOOL PROGRAMS 8 Middle School Cur riculum For students entering grades 6, 7, 8 Middle School Students are typically enrolled in three of the following courses: Written Expression 1 Reading Math 6/7 Written Expression 2-1 Literature 1 Pre-Algebra Written Expression 2-2 Literature 2 Algebra 1 Spanish 1,2 American History (Study Skills 1) French 1,2 Ecology Latin 1,2 ESL Common Middle School course combinations: Written Expression 1 Written Expression 2-1 Written Expression 2-2 Developmental Reading Literature 1 Latin 1 Preview Math 6/7 Am. History (Study Skills 1) Algebra 1 Preview Upper School Cur riculum For students entering grades 9 , 10 , 11 , 12 Upper School Students are typically enrolled in three of the following courses: Written Expression 3 Literature 2 Algebra 1 Biology Written Expression 4 Literature 3 Geometry Chemistry Written Expression 5 Literature 4 Algebra 2 Physics Grammar Lab Summer Reading 2 Pre-Calculus Modern World History (Study Skills 2) Spanish 1,2,3 SAT Critical Reading Ancient World History French 1,2,3 SAT Mathematics United States History (Study Skills 3) Latin 1,2,3 ESL Common Upper School course combinations: Written Expression 3 Written Expression 4 Literature 4 Literature 2 U.S. History Preview Pre-Calculus Preview Geometry Preview Spanish Preview Chemistry Preview The School serves as a valuable transition for students preparing for boarding school or a new school setting. Through Wolfeboro, students experience boarding school without a full year commitment. Wolfeboro
  • 12. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 9 T he School offers a traditional middle and secondary school college preparatory curriculum. Courses may be taken in the subject areas of English, writing, literature, reading, mathematics, history, science, Latin, Spanish, French, SAT Preparation, English as a Second Language and study skills. The School’s underlying emphasis is on the development and cultivation of effective study skills and, more importantly, of effective study habits. The student’s non-academic program is designed to be supportive of the academic program. Course descriptions in this section serve as a general guideline for course content. Adjustments are made to meet individual needs as well as specific credit requirements for individual schools. The combination of any three courses at Wolfeboro will result in the further development of a student’s study skills as well as study habits. All courses can be taken for credit. Please read our credit policy stated on page 6. Some courses will require a double period thus leaving room for only one additional course. All students will be enrolled in courses meeting in three academic periods per day — six days per week. Academic credit may be earned in Studio Art and/or Physical Education by documented participation in the School’s recreational curriculum in addition to a student’s three course program. Reading Pr ogram READING (Developmental) Courses: All reading courses can be taken for credit and/or Designed For: Students reading on grade level or one to skill-building purposes. two years below; intended to strengthen weak areas of reading so that the student reads with competence and Testing: At the time of application, parents are asked to confidence and establishes a habit of reading. submit complete school records which should include a measure of the student’s current reading ability. All students Content: Word mechanisms, vowel and consonant sounds, enrolled in reading will be administered a Stanford word stems, syllabification, vocabulary meaning, key words, Diagnostic Reading Test at the beginning and the end phrase reading, selection of main ideas, noting details, of the program. recognizing analogies, comparing and contrasting, drawing conclusions and noting inferences and implications. Reading For Pleasure: In addition to in-class activities and out-of-class exercises for each student in the reading pro- Materials: Individually selected to meet the student’s needs. gram, all students are expected to read a minimum of one READING (Advanced) hour per day from a book chosen in conjunction with both the reading teacher and the student. The purpose of this Designed For: The above average reader. additional reading is to help students develop the habit Content: The course emphasizes speed and comprehension. of reading and to learn to read for pleasure. Books include Course includes speed reading, skimming and scanning. fiction, adventure, mystery and sports stories. Informal comment is encouraged as a student progresses through the Materials: Individually selected to meet the student’s needs. book, but no written review is demanded. Most students will read approximately 30 pages per day. READING (Basic) Designed For: Students reading at least two levels below grade or with specific learning difficulties. Content: Development of accurate word decoding skills, reading techniques, vocabulary and comprehension. Materials: Individually designed; parents or current school must provide a detailed analysis of the student’s recent reading program, materials used, recent evaluation of progress and suggestions for areas of concentration. Every effort is made to design a program as part of the student’s developmental continuum and not an isolated series of exercises. The School must know as much as possible about each student’s educational history as well as proposed programs for the future. Wolfeboro
  • 13. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 10 SAT 1 PREPARATION (Critical Reading) 3. Most students have made significant progress with summer reading through this system. Since the reading activity is Designed For: Rising 11th and 12th grade students in need done by the student at the student’s discretion, the extent of developing stronger verbal skills which will contribute to of progress while at Wolfeboro can vary considerably and greater success on the Critical Reading (verbal) section of is dependent upon motivation and reading ability. the new SAT 1. Summer Reading Option 2 Content: The primary goal of SAT 1 Preparation (Critical Reading) is to equip the student with the tools necessary to Designed For: The student with a challenging and/or exces- approach the New SAT 1 with confidence. Course content sive summer reading assignment required by the student’s will reflect the structure and content of the newly revised school and who would be overwhelmed with three-core SAT 1 emphasizing critical reading and written expression to courses in addition to a summer reading requirement. include grammar. Newly published SAT practice materials are This course is considered one of the student’s three allotted used on a weekly basis. Short story content is used as a medium courses. Accordingly, students will receive weekly grades for further developing active reading skills, analytical abilities, and teacher reports. Midterm and end-of-session grades as as well as the improvement of critical reading, written well as reports will be sent to parents. expression and reading comprehension skills. It is anticipated that very few students will be enrolled in Materials: The New SAT 1 Workbook, (Kaplan); The Option #2. New SAT 1 Writing Workbook, (Kaplan) and 11 Course Expectations: Practice Tests for the New SAT 1, (Princeton Review). 1. Course meets six days per week. 2. Includes a minimum one-hour daily preparation to include SUMMER READING reading as well as a written component. 3. Extensive in-class activities to include discussion of nightly (Assigned by Student’s School) reading, response writing and journal entries. Schools that require summer reading expect that reading 4. Careful completion of any related essays or reports as will be a daily activity commencing at the conclusion of stipulated by the student’s individual school. the school year and continuing until the project has been 5. A strong emphasis on the development of active reading completed. Wolfeboro does not assume responsibilty for strategies essential for improved reading comprehension. the student’s summer reading assignment but will Materials: Titles as required by the student’s school. Please support the project through two program options. note that a second copy of each required book will be provided It is anticipated that most students will be able to make to the teacher for reference purposes and will be charged to satisfactory progress with their summer reading the student’s personal expense account. Additional organiza- endeavors through Option 1. tional and support materials as required by the instructor. Summer Reading Option 1 Writing Designed For: Students who have been assigned summer reading by their school and are expected to make some progress on the project while at Wolfeboro. This program is provided as an optional service to students and is not a graded course nor will the student be required to complete P lacement in the proper writing course requires consider- able input from those who know the student’s writing skills the best. Teachers should be consulted about placement. all related reading and writing assignments. Parents may request that the student not participate. Students are excused Also, it is helpful if parents send a sample of the student’s from the program upon completion of their reading writing which has been corrected by the teacher. requirement. In addition to this option, a student must Written Expression 1 is the least challenging course; Written take a three-core course program. Expression 5 is the most sophisticated. When attempting to Outline of Option 1 Program: select the appropriate writing course, give consideration to 1. Each student is assigned a summer reading monitor. including a literature course and/or a study skills course as a 2. The monitor does the following: companion to a writing course. a) Meets with the student two times per week during one of the student’s morning study periods. b) Tracks and records the student’s progress, encourages continued reading, addresses unusual difficulties as needed and provides a quiet time for reading or study. Wolfeboro
  • 14. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 11 WRITTEN EXPRESSION 1 (Basic) WRITTEN EXPRESSION 4 (The Process of Writing) Designed For: Rising 6th and 8th grade students. Designed For: Rising 10th and 11th grade students. Content: Grammar, punctuation, spelling, organization of Content: Reading and studying essays written in different material and other topics judged appropriate by the teacher. modes; descriptive, narrative, persuasive, comparison/contrast. Using model essays, students develop their own essays in each Materials: Wordly Wise, Book 2 (EPS), Exercises in of the various modes. Following a process methodology, students English, Level F; A Book of Short Stories 1 and other gain daily practice in the following: prewriting, mapping, selected short stories. outlining, thematic focus, drafting, revision and editing. The primary goal is the development of confidence in ideation and WRITTEN EXPRESSION 2-1 (Grammar and the ability to express ideas. In addition to daily writing, activities Composition) include journal keeping, class discussions and tutorials. Designed For: Rising 7th and 8th grade students. Materials: The Longman Reader, 6th Edition (Allyn & Content: Reading for understanding, vocabulary, grammar Bacon). and composition. WRITTEN EXPRESSION 5 (The Polished Critical Materials: A Book of Short Stories 1, and other selected Essay) short stories, Wordly Wise, Book 5 (EPS); Exercises in Designed For: Rising 11th and 12th grade students. English, Level G. Content: This course supports the development of the polished WRITTEN EXPRESSION 2-2 (Grammar and critical essay with specific reference to literature as well as Composition) an introduction to college-level writing. This course also Designed For: Rising 9th and 10th grade students. includes practice writing of a coherent college essay. Course skills include the following: close reading of text, Content: Reading for understanding, vocabulary, grammar developing a thesis from the text, supporting thesis statements and composition with an emphasis on writing essays of with evidence and stylistic polishing. In addition to daily personal experience. writing, students will complete a college essay draft for later Materials: Wordly Wise, Book 6 (EPS); Evergreen with consideration. Readings (Houghton Mifflin); Characters in Conflict (Holt). Materials: An Introduction to Literature (Longman); WRITTEN EXPRESSION 3 (Tools for Writing) Writing a Successful College Application Essay (Barron’s). Designed For: Rising 9th and 10th grade students. GRAMMAR LABORATORY (The Structure of the English Sentence) Content: Defining and practicing the components of a basic essay. The course provides an introduction to elements of Designed For: Rising 8th, 9th and 10th grade students of style including the following: writing vivid sentences, sentence average or above average ability in need of comprehensive variety and sentence combination, use of active/passive voice, review of basic grammar and sentence construction. word connotation, punctuation for emphasis, paragraph Content: Students are taught grammar terminology, how to development and transitions. diagram sentences, and how to understand the structure of Materials: Write Right (Ten Speed Press), Wordly Wise, grammar as a series of visual patterns. Through diagramming, Book 7 (EPS). students learn to better understand the logic and structure of sentences, which increases logical thinking in general, enables them to transform simple ideas into more sophisticated writing and improves reading comprehension. Materials: Writer’s Choice: English Grammar Workbook 8 (Glencoe, McGraw-Hill); and other materials selected to meet individual student’s needs. Wolfeboro
  • 15. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 12 VOCABULARY BUILDING well as in analytical and inference skills. This course can meet the needs of students requiring a credit in 8th, 9th or Designed For: Rising 9th and 10th grade students of above 10th grade English, especially when Written Expression 3 average ability not achieving at a level commensurate with or Written Expression 4 is taken as a companion course. ability; an appropriate companion course for either Written Expression 3 or Written Expression 4. Content: Emphasis is on the development of active reading strategies and techniques. The course teaches students how Content: A review of many of the fundamental principles of to read literature in three genres-- short stories and compact grammar and composition and the development of vocabu- novels, poetry and drama. Students learn how to build lary skills which will contribute to greater success on vocabulary, increase comprehension and retention through standardized tests of verbal ability. annotating, paraphrasing and summarizing text, and how Materials: IMPACT 50 Short Stories, 2nd Edition (Holt, to critically analyze the poem, the essay, the structure and Rinehart and Winston). techniques of the drama and the elements of the short story. Guided reading is an instructional cornerstone. Literatur e Authors read include Steinbeck, Shakespeare, Fitzgerald, Williams, Housman, and Hemingway. T he following courses are designed to reinforce and develop basic skills in English and meet the needs of students of varying ages, abilities and learning styles. Although the Materials: Perrine’s Literature Structure, Sound and Sense, 8th Edition (Arp & Johnson); Sophocles/The Oedipus Cycle (Harcourt Brace); other materials selected to meet individual student’s needs. courses follow a traditional syllabus, strong emphasis is LITERATURE 3 placed on meeting individual needs while developing an appreciation for the intrinsic value of literature. Designed For: Rising 10th and 11th grade students whose needs fall in between the challenge of Literature 2 and the LITERATURE 1 rigor of Literature 4. This course can meet the needs of Designed For: Rising 7th, 8th and 9th grade students needing students requiring a credit in 10th or 11th grade English, improvement in reading motivation and comprehension and especially when Written Expression 3 or Written Expression 4 whose tested reading skills are average or below. Literature 1 is taken as a companion course. proceeds at a somewhat slower pace than Literature 2, Content: Literature 3 presents the three genres of literature covering fewer works but in greater detail. This course can (drama, poetry and short fiction.) Students will further meet the needs of students requiring a credit in 7th, 8th or develop strategies of vocabulary building, comprehension 9th grade English, especially when combined with a Written and retention, paraphrasing, summarizing text and will also Expression course. Students may also benefit from the improve their ability to critically analyze works of literature Developmental Reading Program. in writing and in class discussion. Content: Emphasis is on developing reading motivation, Materials: An Introduction to Literature, 12th Edition concentration, comprehension and retention. Students learn (Longman); other materials selected to meet individual how to build vocabulary, paraphrase and summarize text, infer student’s needs. overall meaning, and how to visually outline, analyze, and write about a poem, the essay, and the short story. Other strategies LITERATURE 4 taught include maintaining a daily journal of reading assignments Designed For: Rising 11th and 12th grade students. This and how to read, comprehend and interpret passages aloud. course can meet the needs of students requiring a credit in Authors read include Steinbeck, Poe, Updike, Thurber, 11th or 12th grade English, especially when accompanied Shakespeare, Housman, Dickinson, Hemingway. by Written Expression 4 or Written Expression 5. Materials: IMPACT 50 Short Stories (Holt, Rinehart Content: Literature 4 presents the three genres of literature and Winston) and other selected short stories; To Kill a (drama, poetry and short fiction) and develops heightened Mockingbird (a novel); other materials selected to meet strategies of vocabulary building, comprehension and reten- individual student’s needs. tion, paraphrasing, summarizing and textual annotating, and critical analysis. Students learn a variety of literature terms, LITERATURE 2 how to select appropriate evidence within the structures pre- Designed For: Rising 8th, 9th and 10th grade students in sented, and how to write critically about both the classical need of further development in reading comprehension as and modern selections studied, which include a Greek play, Wolfeboro
  • 16. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 13 a Shakespearean play, modern drama (e.g., Ibsen, Williams), Science short fiction (e.g., Poe, Hawthorne, Faulkner), and poetry (e.g., Dickinson, Owens, Eliot, Marvel). Materials: An Introduction to Literature, 12th Edition (Longman); other materials selected to meet individual student’s needs. P review courses are structured to survey the fundamental principles with an emphasis on key vocabulary and pertinent study skills. Credit courses often necessitate a double period, emphasize the basic concepts of a full-year SAT Pr eparation course and are modified to accommodate requirements as directed by the student’s school. NOTE: Students seeking a three-course program designed to maximize SAT preparation should consider the following Please note: Biology, Chemistry and Physics are presented three-course curriculum: without laboratory; the local environment serves as the Course 1: Written Expression 5 (The Polished Critical laboratory for Ecology. Essay) described on page 13. Course 2: SAT 1 Preparation (Critical Reading) BIOLOGY Course 3: SAT 1 Preparation (Mathematics) Designed For: Secondary school students. SAT 1 PREPARATION (Critical Reading) Content: This course presents an intensive study of traditional Designed For: Rising 11th and 12th grade students in need secondary school Biology. The curriculum begins with the of developing stronger verbal skills which will contribute to study of atomic and chemical concepts. The course is greater success on the Critical Reading (verbal) section of designed to present cellular biology at the organism level the New SAT 1. stressing part to whole relationships. Course content includes human biological systems. Content: The primary goal of SAT 1 Preparation (Critical Reading) is to equip the student with the tools necessary to Text: Biology: The Web of Life (Foresmann--Wesley). approach the New SAT 1 with confidence. Course content will reflect the structure and content of the newly revised PHYSICS SAT 1 emphasizing critical reading and written expression to include grammar. Newly published SAT practice materials Designed For: Secondary school students. are used on a weekly basis. Short story content is used as a Content: This course includes the essential topics included in medium for further developing active reading skills, analytical a traditional secondary school Physics curriculum. Topics abilities, as well as the improvement of critical reading, include linear and projectile motion, Newton’s laws of motion, written expression and reading comprehension skills. momentum, energy, waves, sound and light. The curriculum Materials: The New SAT 1 Critical Reading Workbook, can be modified to match the curriculum level of 9th and 10th (Kaplan); The New SAT 1 Writing Workbook, (Kaplan); 11 grade conceptual physics courses as well as traditional physics Practice Tests for the New SAT 1, (Princeton Review); 50 courses typically targeted at the 11th and 12th grade levels. Great American Short Stories, (Bantam Books). Scientific calculator required. SAT 1 PREPARATION (Mathematics) Text: Conceptual Physics (Addison--Wesley) or Physics Designed For: Rising 11th and 12th grade students in need of (Merrill) as needed. developing stronger mathematics and test-taking skills which will contribute to greater success on the Mathematics section CHEMISTRY of the New SAT 1. Students must have completed the Designed For: Secondary school students. equivalent of Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2. Content: The Chemistry curriculum includes the essential Content: The course includes a review of relevant topics in topics typically found in a traditional secondary school program. Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2 as well as statistics, Major topics include classification and measurement systems, probability and data analysis. Other primary goals include atomic theory and periodic table, chemical nomenclature, the development of test-taking strategies and confidence, as well as a reduction in test-taking anxiety often associated writing and balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, gas with standardized test-taking. New SAT 1 practice tests laws, acid-base reactions and equilibrium reactions. Scientific are utilized weekly. calculator required. Materials: The New SAT 1 Math Workbook, (Kaplan); Text: Chemistry (Addison--Wesley). 11 Practice Tests for the New SAT 1, (Princeton Review). Wolfeboro
  • 17. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 14 ECOLOGY STUDY SKILLS 2 (World History Preview) Designed For: Middle and secondary school students. Designed For: Rising 9th and 10th grade students. The course is especially valuable to the student who plans to take World Content: This course is designed to provide students with an or European History the next school year. appreciation for the delicate interdependent nature of global environmental systems as well as the details and inter workings Content: Described above. of individual ecosystems. Specific topics include energy and matter in the ecosystem, ecosystem balance, terrestrial, fresh Text: World History: Perspectives on the Past (D.C. water and marine biomes, organic fuels and nuclear energy as Heath ‘97). well as alternative energy sources. The curriculum is modified STUDY SKILLS 3 (United States History Preview) for different grade levels as needed. Designed For: Rising 10th and 11th grade students. Text: Environmental Science: Ecology and Human This course is especially valuable for the student who plans Impact (Addison--Wesley). to take United States History the next school year. Study Skills Content: Described above. Text: The Americans (McDougal, Littell); Mastering C ourses in this program have been designed to teach specific study techniques and to complement, reinforce and integrate with courses in reading, writing, literature and history. United States Study Skills (Workbook). Histor y AMERICAN HISTORY This program has evolved from an acute awareness of the need to provide the student with a realistic arena in which skills Designed For: Rising 7th, 8th and 9th grade students in need of can be learned, refined and practiced within the context of American History. subjects commonly encountered in school. Content: This is a survey of American History with emphasis Results are best attained by using social studies and historical on selected topics of major events which shaped the history materials as the base on which each course is built. Among of the United States beginning with early voyages to the New the study techniques which are emphasized are outlining, World and ending with the Vietnam conflict. Strong empha- note taking, interpretation of maps, charts, graphs, tables sis is placed on reading strategies, the construction of a good and primary sources. The ultimate goal is to teach the student essay, note taking, outlining and test preparation. to read, synthesize and respond intelligently in essay form Text: The American Nation (Prentice Hall). to the subject under consideration. For some students, a study skills course can be taken for credit in history or ANCIENT WORLD HISTORY social studies. Designed For: Rising 9th, 10th and 11th grade students in need of Ancient World History or an equivalent course. Please note: The goal of teaching and learning broadbased study Course content can be modified to meet requirements as skills is integrated into all courses at Wolfeboro. It is not neces- requested by a student’s individual school. sary to take a course within this specific curriculum in order to improve a student’s study skills. The combination of any Content: Ancient World History covers the period between three courses at Wolfeboro will result in the further devel- the Classical Civilizations to the height of The Middle Ages. opment of a student’s study skills as well as study habits. The course focuses on the development of Western Civilization but may include other cultures. Political, economic and social developments are central to the curriculum. STUDY SKILLS 1 (American History Preview) A student in need of a preview of Ancient World History may be Designed For: Rising 7th, 8th and 9th grade students. best served through our Study Skills 2 course. The course is often used to supplement a course in Reading and/or Written Expression. Text: World History: Perspectives on the Past (D.C. Content: Described above. Heath ‘97). Text: The American Nation (Prentice Hall). Wolfeboro
  • 18. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 15 MODERN WORLD HISTORY MATH 6/7 (Arithmetic Foundations) (Western Civilization, Principles of Geography or Modern Designed For: Rising 6th, 7th and 8th grade students who European History) have completed or nearly completed the usual elementary or Designed For: Rising 9th, 10th and 11th grade students in middle school arithmetic program but need additional need of Modern World History. strengthening of basic skills. Content: Modern World History covers the period between Content: The course emphasizes addition, subtraction, mul- the Enlightenment and the Age of Imperialism. The course tiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals focuses on the development of Western Civilization but may and percents. Additional topics are covered on an individual include other cultures. Political, economic and social develop- basis after the student has mastered the core curriculum. ments are central to the curriculum. Text: Mathematics: Course I (Dolciani, Houghton Mifflin). A student in need of a preview of Modern World History may MATH 8 (Pre-Algebra) be best served through our Study Skills 2 course. Designed For: Rising 7th, 8th and 9th grade students who Text: World History: Perspectives on the Past (D.C. have not yet mastered the concepts or procedural skills Heath ‘97). prerequisite to the successful study of first-year algebra. UNITED STATES HISTORY Content: Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division of Designed For: Rising 10th, 11th and 12th grade students in rational numbers, basic plane geometry, measurement, need of United States History. percents, ratio, proportion, solution of simple algebraic equations and an overall emphasis on the fraction concept. Content: This is an upper-level United States History course, starting with the American Revolution and the creation of Text: Mathematics: Course II (Dolciani, Houghton Mifflin). government through World War 1. The course emphasizes the economic and political development of critical issues ALGEBRA 1 which shaped the history of the United States. Modification Designed For: Rising 8th, 9th and 10th grade students who can be made to satisfy specific requirements for individual have not completed a full course in first-year algebra or who school credit courses. are in need of further development of first year algebra skills. A student in need of a preview of United States History may be Content: A full course in elementary algebra through the best served through our Study Skills 3 course. solution of quadratic equations. Students are taught the fundamental concepts as well as essential procedural skills. Text: The Americans (McDougal, Littell). Major topics include a brief review of pre-algebra content, manipulation of algebraic espressions, linear equations, Mathematics inequalities, factoring, word problems, graphing functions and quadratic equations. A ll mathematics courses can be taken for credit. Credit courses cover the material traditionally presented in a full- year course. Frequently, a double period of course work is Text: Modern Algebra: Structure and Method (Dolciani; McDougal, Littell). PLANE GEOMETRY necessary thus leaving room for only one additional course. Designed For: Rising 9th and 10th grade students who have Please read our policy regarding academic credit as stated on not yet completed a full course in Plane Geometry or those in page 6. Selected topics in a course can be deleted or added need of further skill development. at the request of the student’s school. We can administer Content: Traditional secondary school course in Plane another school’s final exam, although most students take Geometry including the axiomatic system, line and angle the Wolfeboro exam. relationships, polygons, congruency, similarity, geometry Preview and Review: Every mathematics course can also be of the circle, area and volume. taken for preview and skill building purposes. Course content Text: Geometry Jurgenson/Brown/Jurgenson (McDougal, is modified accordingly. Littell). Wolfeboro
  • 19. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 16 ADVANCED FOUNDATIONS SAT 1 PREPARATION (Mathematics) Designed For: Rising 9th and 10th grade students who demon- Designed For: Rising 11th and 12th grade students in need of strate underdeveloped calculation skills and who need to revisit developing stronger mathematics and test-taking skills which the study of decimals, fractions, percents, ratios, proportions, will contribute to greater success on the Mathematics section related skills and their applications. of the New SAT 1. Students must have completed the equiva- lent of Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2. Content: Intensive drill with fractions, decimals, percents and their applications. The curriculum is modified to meet each Content: The course includes a review of relevant topics in student’s individual needs and goals. Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2 as well as statistics, probability and data analysis. Other primary goals include Text: Selected by the teacher in accordance with the student’s the development of test-taking strategies and confidence as needs. well as a reduction in test-taking anxiety often associated ALGEBRA 2 with standardized test-taking. New SAT 1 practice tests are utilized weekly. Designed For: Rising 10th, 11th and 12th grade students who have yet to fully complete Algebra 2 or those who are in need Materials: The New SAT 1 Math Workbook, (Kaplan); of further skill development at the Algebra 2 level. 11 Practice Tests for the New SAT 1, (Princeton Review). Content: Course topics include linear and quadratic functions, coordinate geometry, the trigonometry of the right triangle For eign Language and systems of equations. The course begins with a brief review of first-year algebra. The course prepares students for a traditional course in Pre-Calculus. Text: Algebra and Trigonometry: Structure and Method (Dolciani; McDougal, Littell). L anguage at Wolfeboro focuses on the four skills of writing, reading, listening and speaking. Major emphasis is placed on grammar and writing; pronunciation is emphasized in speaking. For some students, Wolfeboro may require a double period of PRE - CALCULUS a language, thus leaving only one single period available for a Designed For: Rising 10th, 11th and 12th grade students who third course. have successfully completed Algebra 2 and are now ready for an advanced course in mathematics or for students who are in Preview and Review: All foreign language courses can be taken for preview or skill-building purposes. Course content need of further work at the Pre-Calculus level. is modified accordingly. Content: The major emphasis is on the study of elementary functions. Topics covered include coordinate geometry, cir- SPANISH 1 cular functions and their inverses, polynomial functions, loga- Designed For: Students seeking a full course of first-year rithmic and exponential functions and advanced algebra. Spanish or those students in need of further work at this level. Graphing calculator required. Content: The course includes topics covered in a traditional Text: Advanced Mathematics Brown (McDougal, Littell). Spanish 1 program recognizing that students may have been exposed to different vocabulary inventories. Included is the CALCULUS study of regular and irregular verbs in all three verb conjuga- Designed For: Rising 11th and 12th grade students who have tions. Particular attention is paid to agreement of subject demonstrated adequate mastery through the Pre-Calculus with verb and noun with adjective. level. Offered as enrollment permits. Text: Spanish First Year (Amsco). Content: The course includes a review of essential Pre-Calculus topics and introduces the student to the basic concepts and SPANISH 2 procedures of differential and integral calculus. Designed For: Students seeking a full course of second-year Spanish or those students in need of further work at this level. Text: Calculus (Larson, Hostetler & Edwards). Content: The study of Spanish 2 continues the study of topics usually covered in a traditional Spanish 1 program. Vocabulary is expanded, writing skills refined and grammar drilled in greater depth. Special attention is paid to the relationship between the preterit and imperfect tenses and in uses of ser and estar. Text: Repaso (Published by NTC). Wolfeboro
  • 20. COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N S Continued 17 SPANISH 3 FRENCH 2 Designed For: Students needing a full course of third-year Designed For: Students seeking a full year course in second-year Spanish or those students in need of further work at this level. French or those students in need of further work at this level. Content: The study of Spanish 3 continues the study of topics Content: The study of French 2 continues the study of topics typically covered in a traditional Spanish 2 curriculum. As with usually covered in a traditional French 1 program. Vocabulary all courses in the Wolfeboro curriculum, course content will is expanded, writing skills refined and grammar drilled in greater be developed to mirror the skills and rigor inherent in the depth. Special attention is paid to all personal pronouns and to student’s other school’s curriculum as appropriate. the comparison of the two tenses, imparfait and passé composé. Text: Selected by the teacher in accordance with student needs. Text: French Two Years (Amsco); Le Monstre dans le Métro et dáutres Mervielles (Amsco). LATIN 1 Designed For: Students seeking a full course of first-year Latin FRENCH 3 or those students in need of further work at this level. Designed For: Students needing a full course of third-year Content: The study of Latin is pursued up to and including French or those students in need of further work at this level. the four uses of the subjunctive. Content: The study of French 3 continues the study of topics typically covered in a traditional French 2 curriculum. As with Text: Cambridge Latin Course, Part I. all courses in the Wolfeboro curriculum, course content will LATIN 2 be developed to mirror the skills and rigor inherent in the student’s other school’s curriculum as appropriate. Designed For: Students seeking a full course of second year Latin or those students in need of further work at this level. Text: Selected by the teacher in accordance with student needs. Content: The course covers sections of Caesar’s Gallic Wars ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE or equivalent material specified by a student’s own school. Each year approximately 20 to 25 students seek admission to Text: Cambridge Latin Course, Part II. Wolfeboro for the primary goal of improving their abilities in English. Concurrently, many of these students are also LATIN 3 seeking to experience a traditional boarding school routine in Designed For: Students seeking a full course of third year preparation for eventual placement in an American boarding Latin or those students in need of further work at this level. school setting. Enrollment in the English as a Second Language program and curriculum is purposefully limited in number in Content: As specified by the student’s school. order to ensure maximum immersion and skill development. Text: Selected as needed. Designed For: International students seeking concentrated FRENCH 1 work in English to include reading, written expression and conversation. All English as a Second Language courses can Designed For: Students seeking a full course in first-year French be taken for credit. or those students in need of further work at this level. Content: English as a Second Language is offered at the begin- Content: The course includes topics covered in a traditional ning, intermediate and advanced levels. Students in the begin- French 1 program recognizing that students may have been ning and intermediate levels take courses in reading, writing and exposed to different vocabulary inventories. Included is the conversation. Students in the advanced level take one course in study of regular and irregular verbs in all three verb conjuga- reading, one course in writing and a third mainstream course. tions. Particular attention is paid to agreement of subject Advanced level students may take modified courses in subjects with verb and noun with adjective. such as history, mathematics or literature. TOEFL preparation Text: French First Year (Amsco). is integrated into all coursework at each level. Materials: Course materials are individualized by section and level. NOTE: Please consult our ESL literature for additional information. Wolfeboro
  • 21. STUDENT EXPECTATIONS 18 Admission G irls and boys who have completed the 5th grade are eligible to attend the School. Enrollment is for the full session only. The maximum age is 18. Wolfeboro admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the School. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, financial assistance and athletic and other school-administered programs. Basic Fees A flat fee is charged for residence, board, and tuition for the entire session. Most activities are included in the fee except personal expenses and some optional off-campus activities. See Application for 2010 fees. A deposit of $3,000 is due when application for admission is presented. If the student is not admitted, the $3,000 is returned. If the student is accepted, the $3,000 is credited toward the total fee for residence, board, and tuition and is not returnable. Application An application is enclosed with our school literature and is available at www.wolfeboro.org. Invoice An invoice is presented upon written confirmation of the student’s acceptance and is payable by June 1st. Personal Expense Deposit A $1,400 personal expenses deposit will be included on the invoice. This deposit allows the student to make charges for items such as allowances, laundry, books, entertainment, trips, and various incidental expenses. An exact accounting will be made of this fund. Parents are responsible for over- charges; credits are returned. Foreign Service Fee For students whose residence is outside the United States, an additional $150 fee will be included on the invoice to support correspondence and processing costs. Wolfeboro
  • 22. FACTS Wolfeboro 19 Season Vision Academic Program For Success A Season For Success Purpose The primary purpose is constructive Mission scholastic studies. All courses are offered Daily Schedule To create a program and community for credit. Each student’s program is designed to maximize the opportunity Academics individualized and guided by a specifically for each student to achieve his or her 6:45 am Rising Bell developed Goals Document. Every individual goals and live the life of a 7:05 Waiters’ Bell course addresses the development of successful student for 6 weeks. 7:15 Breakfast effective and efficient study skills, habits, 7:45 Daily Chores Program organization, motivation and confidence. and Inspection A traditional, college preparatory program Support 8:05 am Class Bell is integrated with supportive recreation, • Positive environment 8:10 1st Period activities and residential life. The School • Individualized Goals Document 9:00 2nd Period emphasizes preparation in core academic • Required Wolfeboro Planbook 9:50 3rd Period subjects. The development of organiza- • Emphasis on organization/study skills 10:40 Recess/Snacks tional and study skills as well as sound • Thorough accountability 10:50 4th Period study habits is paramount. The simplified • Daily evaluation and grading 11:40 5th Period environment promotes confidence, focus • Weekly internal written reports 12:30 pm End of 5th and success. • Weekly academic recognition Period Location • Supervised evening study halls Lakes Region of Central New • Extensive and required extra help Activities Hampshire. Lakeside campus 2 miles Overview 12:50 pm Waiters’ Bell from the village of Wolfeboro. • Each student takes 3 courses per day. 1:00 Dinner Year Established • Each course meets 6 days per week. 2:00 Programmed 1910 • Two periods per day are designated to Activities and for extra help, study and/or rest. 5:00 Sports Head of School • Typical class size is 4-6 students. 5:15 School Meeting Edward A. Cooper • Approximately 70 students take at least 5:50 Waiters’ Bell Staff Total - 108 one course for credit each year. 6:00 Supper Teaching Faculty.....37 Administration..6 6:40 Intramural Course Offerings by Subject Residential Faculty..31 Medical Staff.....4 to League Play English SAT Preparation Support Staff .........30 7:20 Written Expression Mathematics Average full-time teaching experience Literature Biology, Chemistry exceeds 15 years per teacher. Vocabulary & Physics Academics Reading History 7:20 pm Prep for Facilities Grammar Latin, Spanish Evening Studies •128 acres •1250 feet of shore line Study Skills & French 7:30 Evening Studies •36 classrooms •3 study halls ESL 8:30 Break •3 residential campuses 8:45 Evening Studies Travel to Wolfeboro Principal Buildings 9:30 End of Evening Chartered supervised bus travel is pro- •Jousson Dining Hall Studies vided to and from the airport at the •Johnson Center 9:45 Prep for Lights opening and closing of the session. •William Cooper Student Center Out Driving time 10:00 Lights Out Other Facilities From Boston 2 hours 3 tennis courts, 2 basketball courts, From Westchester County, NY 6 hours volleyball court, softball/baseball field, From Manchester, NH 1-1/4 hours soccer field, weight room, complete waterfront (6 swimming lanes, Medical Resources sailboats, canoes, kayaks) Huggins Hospital 1-1/2 miles away Fire/Rescue 1-1/2 miles away Nursing Staff On campus 911 Calling Wolfeboro
  • 23. FACTS A simplified environment Continued Admission Applicants must be at least 10 years old by the start of the session. The 20 maximum age is 18; grades 6-12; Typical Yearly Enrollment promotes learning enrollment is for the full session 2005 - 2009 only. Admission policies are non- Total Enrollment: 195 Events of the Day discriminatory. The school is a Tuesday, July 14, 2009 Boarding Boys:137 non-profit organization. 1:50 pm Prep Bell for WLM/MAPS Boarding Girls: 58 Admission information and 2010 2:00 pm WLM/MAPS Week 4 Continues: application are available at Group 4 - Day Hike www.wolfeboro.org Group 5 - Boating Safety or by request. Typical Yearly Group 6 - Water Safety Boarding Student Enrollment Group 1 - Camp Sports Group 2 & 3 - Basic Fitness 2005 - 2009 Non-Academic Program Age Distribution: MAPS Studio Art Lifeguard Training Daily Activities and Recreation: Ages 11-14: 68 (32%) Weight Room Ages 15-16: 92 (48%) Basketball Lifeguard Training/Water Safety Ages 17-18: 35 (20%) Ping-Pong/Barn Softball Intramural Sports Geographic Distribution: Fall Sports Training 3:00 pm MAPS Tennis CPR/First Aid United States: 149 MAPS CPR MAPS Studio Art Studio Arts International: 46 MAPS Baseball Physical Fitness MAPS Soccer MAPS Basketball Swimming, Sailing, Canoeing, States & U.S. Territories Weight Room Kayaking, Hiking, Soccer, Basketball, Represented 2005-2009 Canoeing/ Kayaking Sailing Baseball, Softball, Volleyball, Alabama New Hampshire General Swim Tennis, Ping Pong, Lacrosse, Alaska New Jersey Arizona New Mexico Aerobics, Weight Lifting 4:00 pm Open Studio Art California New York Weight Room Colorado North Carolina Weekend Trips: Basketball Connecticut Ohio MAPS Hiking Groups A,B,C Movie Theaters Roller Skating Delaware Oklahoma Swim Lessons District of Columbia Oregon Sailing Water Park Bowling Florida Pennsylvania Canoeing/ Kayaking Minor League Baseball Game Georgia Puerto Rico General Swim Amusement Park Idaho Rhode Island Illinois South Carolina 5:00 pm All School Meeting Indiana South Dakota Countries Represented 2005-2009 Kansas Tennessee 6:40 pm INTRAMURALS: Kentucky Texas Afghanistan Mexico Louisiana Utah Softball: Average Joe’s vs. Angola Nicaragua Maine Vermont Mind Erasers Antigua Nigeria Maryland Virgin Islands Soccer: The Octagon vs. Bahamas Palestine Massachusetts Virginia The Tropics Belgium Panama Michigan Washington Basketball: Hollabacks vs. Bermuda Philippines Minnesota West Virginia Channel 5 News Team Brazil Poland Mississippi Wisconsin British West Indies Portugal Missouri Wyoming Volleyball: Semi Pro vs. Canada Republic of China Nevada Ellusive Eels Dominican Republic Russia 8:45 pm Intramural, Hikers and East Africa Saudi Arabia Boaters of the Week go to town Ecuador Singapore for ice cream. England South Korea Typical Yearly Regional France Spain Representation 2005- 2009 Germany Sweden Ghana Switzerland New England (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) 31 Hong Kong Taiwan Mid-Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA, WV) 44 Iceland Thailand 93 Camp School Road India Turkey Southeast (AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN) 26 P.O. Box 390 Italy Venezuela Southwest (NM, OK, TX) 8 Wolfeboro, NH 03894 Jamaica Vietnam Japan West Indies Midwest (IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO,OH,SD,WI) 13 TEL: (603) 569-3451 Kuwait Rocky Mountains (AZ, CO, ID, NV, WY, UT) 8 FAX: (603) 569-4080 Pacific Coast (AK, CA, OR, WA) 18 E-mail: school@wolfeboro.org www.wolfeboro.org Wolfeboro US Territories (PR, VI) 1
  • 24. Downtown 28 109 Wolfeboro 2 miles Lake Wentworth & from school Crescent Pond Wolfeboro Bay on Lake Winnipesaukee Hospital Pleasant Valley Road Fire & Police Department Gravel Road entrance to school 1.5 miles from school Wolfeboro Campus Rust Pond Location & Directions The School is situated about two miles from the center of Wolfeboro, a charming New England town in mid-New Hampshire. The School is located on a 128-acre tract Middleton Road 28 of woodland and meadows extending for To Alton about a quarter mile along the shore of Rust Pond. Rust Pond is a crystal-clear, 11 spring-fed lake named for the pioneer Alton Bay Traffic Circle farmer who cleared the land. It is about two miles long and three quarters of a To Portsmouth 54 miles 28 To Concord 11 To Boston- 100 miles mile wide, allowing for easy supervision 44 miles of all water activities. Teacher Room Academic Area Basketball & Boys’ Residential Volleyball Girls’ Playing Field Residential Johnson Center Barn Tennis Jousson Lodge Dining Room Boys’ Residential Rust Pond Beach/Dock Wolfeboro