Managing Stakeholder Relationships

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I facilitated a stakeholder relationships workshop for a client recently. This presentation was the "background framework" used to shape the work done by this management team.

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Managing Stakeholder Relationships

  1. 1. “Influencing Stakeholders” Making sure that those who count are aware that you count Roelf Woldring 1- 416-427-1567 roelf@knowthatknowhowknowwhy.com Version 3 www.knowthatknowhowknowwhy.com Soft Skill Development For Working Professionals Be the best team player and manager of others you can be © Roelf Woldring and Workplace Competence International 2011 - 2015
  2. 2. Spring 2015 2 What is this? Answers to the following questions: 1. What are stakeholders? 2. What is in it for me = you? 3. Who is Roelf Woldring? What presence does he have on the Web? 4. What frameworks help us think about how to influence them? – The Diffusion of Innovations – Everett Rogers – Development Styles – Roelf Woldring – Influencing Elected Stakeholders – Roelf Woldring 1. How do these frameworks interact? 2. How do we use them to think through our interaction with key stakeholders?
  3. 3. Spring 2015 3 What is in it for me = you? • Sync a team’s thinking about how to influencing key stakeholders positively – A framework that allows a management team to get on the “same wavelength” about how to manage stakeholder messaging. • Deliver “change” interventions that flex to individual needs – A “problem solving” model that integrates the best thinking about innovation, change and personality into guidelines for planning interaction and communication with key stakeholders. • Deliver effective messages to “elected political stakeholders” – A problem solving model for structuring the communications that most effectively impact “elected” political stakeholders. • Increase your personal “flex” effectiveness – Ways of thinking and acting that become internalized, increasing your personal effectiveness when interacting with individual and groups of stakeholders.
  4. 4. Spring 2015 4 • E-Author, E-Learning Architect, Business Problem Solver and Entrepreneur • Publishes on the web in the following formats – Voice overs, e-books, e-articles and presentations on Roelf’s web site - http://www.roelfwoldring.com/ – Videos on You Tube at https://www.youtube.com/user/RoelfW – No-charge e-pubs on Slide Share – see http://www.slideshare.net/Woldring – E-Learning programs at www.knowthatknowhowknowwhy.com – E-articules on E-Learning and Talent Management on Linked In Posts https://www.linkedin.com/today/posts/roelfwoldring • Career as Organizational Change Leader / Consultant and IT Executive – Linked Profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/roelfwoldring • Passionate about the potential of e-learning – As a way of contributing to the people of the under developed world through personal skill development – As a professional development platform for the growing numbers of Individual Professional Entrepreneurs – As a tool for professional development within organizations Before we start: Who is Roelf Woldring and What Does he do?
  5. 5. • If you find this Slide Share post useful: – Click Like on Slide Share so that it gets shared with others or add a comment so that you contribute to the dialogue – Forward it / share it with colleagues use the button on the bottom left – Embed it in another web site Use the Embed button at the upper right • Join Roelf’s E-Learning community – Click on the image to the right and get a non-charge copy of the one of the e-books Spring 2015 5 Call to Action Browse to the KTKHKW web site and view the e-learning programs Click on the banner below to see the course intro’s
  6. 6. Spring 2015 6 What makes Stakeholders so important? Stakeholders are the key source of: 1. Evidence  Provide evidence which supports our successful work  Provide evidence which supports our unsuccessful work 1. Decisions  Go / No Go decisions at various stages in our projects / programs  Resource level decisions throughout our projects / programs ($, people, facilities, relationships) 1. Recommendations / Reputation / Repeat Work  Recommend us to others  Praise us / damn us with others  Ask us to do more work for and with them in future We want all Stakeholders to know about the good things we are doing We want to immediately know from All Stakeholders  about the unsuccessful things that we are doing  About the negative perceptions that they may have of us
  7. 7. Spring 2015 7 Building a Stakeholder Map (1 of 3) • Brainstorm with all the people who are involved with or impacted by what we are doing • Identify how what we are doing impacts them and could impact them, + and - • Understand the relationships between the stakeholders • Accept that we cannot control “how” the stakeholders make sense of information • Inventory the communication channels available to us • Inventory the communication channels available to stakeholders as they relate to one another Common Understanding is What is Important
  8. 8. Spring 2015 8 Draw the Stakeholder Map (2 of 3) Generic Stake Holder Map for Publicly-Traded, For-Profit Organization Organization Customers Suppliers Regulators Competitors Employees Unions Board of Directors Investors Investment Advisors Bankers Other Suppliers of Funds Other Individuals Other Organizations with “Interests” Governmental Public OfficialsElected Politicians Each of these external organizations, groups or individuals is impacted by or can have an impact on the organization. Any of these groups could be split into two or more sub-groups, depending on the use of the stakeholder map.
  9. 9. Spring 2015 9 Summarize what we know about stakeholders (3 of 3) Stakeholder Impact on the Organization (Current and Potential) Impacted By the Organization (Current and Potential) Positive Negative Positive Negative Customers Suppliers Competitors Employees Other Individuals Unions Board of Directors Investors Investment Advisors Other Sources of Funds Bankers Regulators Other Orgs with “Interest” Elected Politicians This is a way of thinking about stakeholders. It may or may not be done as a “formal analysis”, producing the equivalent of this table. Generically Publicly-Traded, For-Profit Organization
  10. 10. Spring 2015 10 The Frameworks – The Diffusion of Innovations – Everett Rogers – Helps us understand how change/ innovation spreads in organizations and in society – Development Styles – Roelf Woldring – Helps us understand on individuals differ in the way that they make sense of the new information associated with change – Influencing Elected Stakeholders – Roelf Woldring – Helps us understand how to interact with Elected Stakeholders – who may not be directly impacted by our projects, – but due to their decision making power over public funds, – can deeply impact our projects Let’s look at them one at a time
  11. 11. Spring 2015 11Spring 2011 11 The Diffusion of Innovation: Everett Rodgers (1 of 6) What is important for us in this model is not the numbers but the psychology and the resulting behavior of the different groups Rodgers, E. (1962) Diffusion of innovations. Free Press, London, NY, USA. The rate at which individuals adopt a new innovation in a population.
  12. 12. Spring 2015 12Spring 2011 12 The Diffusion of Innovation The Psychology and The Behavior of Stakeholder Innovators (2 of 6) Group Psychology Behavior Who Influences Them How to Work With Them Innovators Excited by new things; experimenters Want to be seen as “first” to successfully take on new “things” by individuals in their “reputation” community Experiment with new things, looking to see how it influences their “reputation” as being leading edge Willing to pay a “time / cost” premium to be first Suppliers of new “things” and ways of doing things People who have new things which they can use to impress folks in their “reputation community” with being successfully “first” 1.Find them 2. Support “the hell” out of them  maximize their possibility of success 3. Identify their “reputation” community 4.Make sure that their success stories are told to this community and to “early adopters”
  13. 13. Spring 2015 13Spring 2011 13 The Diffusion of Innovation The Psychology and The Behavior of Stakeholder Early Adopters (3 of 6) Group Psychology Behavior Who Influences Them How to Work With Them Early Adopters Willing to take on new things / ways once “proven” by Innovators  do not want to be seen as “failures” – not willing to take on this risk Watch Innovators to see what works and what does not and to see who gets positive reputation and who does not Innovators who succeed at getting a reputation for successfully adopting new things that work Other early adopters who succeed or fail when they take on the “new” 1.Tell them the successful Innovators’ story 2.Let them self select to be “2nd round” adopters 3.Work with them to succeed 4.Work with them so that they tell their stories to their peer groups
  14. 14. Spring 2015 14Spring 2011 14 The Diffusion of Innovation The Psychology and The Behavior of Stakeholder Early Majority Individuals (4 of 6) Group Psychology Behavior Who Influences Them How to Work With Them Early Majority Want to take on new things once there is clear evidence that it generally works and that it is being adopted by others Accept word of people they see as peers, not innovators or suppliers Adopt new based on word of credible peers Frustrated if they cannot get it when they do decide they want it Want it, but also concerned about the cost of “adopting it”: concerned about “cost of failure” Early Adopters who succeed Early Adopters who fail Early Majority who adopt “new” and then fail at “visible cost” 1.Identify “high risk” of failure Early Majority, and work with them to reduce / eliminate chance of failure 2.Re-engineer offering on basis of past learnings to reduce possibility of failure 3.Re-engineer offering on basis of past learnings to reduce effort cost of adoption
  15. 15. Spring 2015 15Spring 2011 15 The Diffusion of Innovation The Psychology and The Behavior of Stakeholder Late Majority Individuals (5 of 6) Group Psychology Behavior Who Influences Them How to Work With Them Late Majority Will only adopt “new” when it is well established Price point is more important than “newness” Looking to negotiate price or waiting for “sale” price Sensitive to purchase price to acquire and “effort price” needed to learn how to use Successful Early Majority Unsuccessful Early Majority Late Majority who tell them how to “simplify” use of new so that effort price is reduced 1.Re-engineer offering on basis of past learnings to reduce both purchase price and “effort price” 2.Connect them to peers who can share “simple ways” of using new (e.g. user groups)
  16. 16. Spring 2015 16Spring 2011 16 The Diffusion of Innovation The Psychology and The Behavior of Laggard (5 of 6) Group Psychology Behavior Who Influences Them How to Work With Them Laggards Resist change – comfortable with old ways of doing things Fiscally conservative Often only adopt new when “peers” shame or pressure them or when recognized authority “tells them to” Hold onto old until there is no choice Hold onto old if they believe that the price of the “new” will reduce in future Hold onto old until peers “kid” them about being “out of touch” Other Laggards who have adopted new Individuals they recognize as “having authority” who reduce / eliminate their choice to stay with old 1. Re-engineer offering on basis of past learnings to reduce both purchase price and “effort price” further or simply discount purchase price on basis of being “old” in market 2. Provide communication channels to / opportunities to be exposed to / dialogue with other Laggards who have adopted new and Authorities who eliminate choice to stay with old
  17. 17. Spring 2015 17 Before we move on, where do you fit? Reflect on this, or talk about it with another member of your team The easiest way to figure this out it to get clear on your behavior. Do you …? Innovator Early Adopter Early Majority Late Majority Thoughtful, Price Conscious Acceptors (Laggards) Experiment with new things, looking to see how it influences your “reputation” as being leading edge Willing to pay a “time / cost” premium to be first Watch Innovators to see what works and what does not; willing to take on “new” once it is proven Wait to see who is successful, gets positive reputation and who does not Adopt new based on word of credible peers Frustrated if you cannot get it when you do decide you do want it Want it, but also concerned about the cost of “adopting it”; concerned about “cost of failure” Look to negotiate price or wait for “sale” price Your are sensitive and concerned about purchase price to acquire and “effort price” needed to learn how to use Hold onto old until there is as long as there is no real reason to change Hold onto old if they believe that the price of the “new” will reduce in future Hold onto old until your friends and family “kid” you about being “out of touch” It could be that you are an “it depends” person, changing your behavior depending on the content of the “new”. Also, remember that is no “best” here, just patterns of behavior.
  18. 18. Spring 2015 18Spring 2011 18 Managing Change Using The Diffusion of Innovation Framework (6 of 6)
  19. 19. The Development Styles Framework How People Work With and Integrate New Information and Acquire New Skills
  20. 20. Spring 2015 20 The Development Styles Framework (1 of 6) • Individuals use different behavior styles when they are acquiring / learning / integrating new information or skills through interaction with others • Consequently, it is important to “shape” the delivery of new information / learning activities in ways that align with each person’s Development Style • Since, generally, it is not possible to know a person’s Development Style before hand, “information / learning” communications need to be structured to cover a “range” of Development Styles
  21. 21. Spring 2015 21 The Development Styles Framework (2 of 6) Step One: How People Integrate New Knowledge • People can be at either end or in the middle of this range – When in the middle, they often use an “it depends” style, determined by the type of content • People generally integrate new knowledge at the “pre-conscious” level – People are so practiced at this that they only become conscious of how they do this in exceptional circumstances – Conscious awareness usually comes through feedback from others, self descriptive instruments, or disciplined self reflection / introspection Practical people integrate new ideas / information based on how it fits their past concrete experiences Conceptual people integrate new information / ideas through integrating them into the conceptual frameworks they already have
  22. 22. Spring 2015 22 The Development Styles Framework (3 of 6) Step Two: At Work, People Acquire / Solidify New Knowledge in Interaction with Others • Some people need to “talk” in order to clarify their thoughts and ideas. If you don’t give them the chance to do so, they do not “get it”. • Other people need time to “reflect”. Unless you give them the time they need to process their thoughts and ideas internally, they do not “get it”. Active people need to talk with someone before the new information / idea is really “real” for them. Their ideas can change as they talk. Reflective people need time to process internally before they are ready to present their ideas to others in dialogue. This internal reflection may occur at the pre-conscious level.
  23. 23. Spring 2015 23 The Development Styles Framework (4 of 6) Step Three: Put These Two Together  Four Development or Learning Styles • These four Development Styles are a good basis for planning interaction with folks on the “receiving end” of “change” information. • They cover “the range” of possibility well. • See http://www.wciltd.com/CompetencyStyl es/sitepages/CS%20%20Development %20Styles%20Work%20Book.html
  24. 24. Spring 2015 24Spring 2011 24 The Development Styles Framework (5 of 8) Influencing Individuals with Different Development Styles Development Style Psychology How to Influence Communications … Follow Ups Practical Actives Want to engage in dialogue to clarify the impact of new ideas and required behavior change Face to face, high touch exchanges with lots of opportunities for them to talk (break outs, idea sharing, one-on-ones with “engaged listeners”) Get them involved in doing new as quickly as possible – anchor to old ways of doing things and then quickly move beyond them Create follow up opportunities in which they can talk about “how it is going” with peers and others Both Practical Actives and Reflectives Need concrete examples they can relate to their past experience Concrete examples, related to but moving beyond their past experience
  25. 25. Spring 2015 25Spring 2011 25 The Development Styles Framework (6 of 8) Influencing Individuals with Different Development Styles Development Style Psychology How to Influence Communications … Follow Ups Practical Reflectives Want to be “exposed” to new ways of doing things, then given an opportunity to “personally” reflect on what it means before further dialogue Presentations, just-in-time materials, handouts they can take away Opportunities to listen to others talk which allow them to “tune out others” and “tune in” to internal processes Separate first exposure from first doing – don’t expect new doing on first exposure Create follow up opportunities in which they can talk what they thinking about, and what they think it means to each of them personally Then engage them in new doing Both Practical Actives and Reflectives Need concrete examples they can relate to their past experience Concrete examples, related to but moving beyond their past experience
  26. 26. Spring 2015 26Spring 2011 26 The Development Styles Framework (7 of 8) Influencing Individuals with Different Development Styles Development Style Psychology How to Influence Communications … Follow Ups Conceptual Actives Want to engage in dialogue to clarify the way that the way that new models and frameworks relate to their existing concepts / frameworks Face to face, high touch exchanges with lots of opportunities for them to talk (break outs, idea sharing, one-on- ones with “engaged listeners”) Provide general models and frameworks, then provide concrete examples / tasks which are placed within context of models Create follow up opportunities in which they can talk about “how it is going” with peers and others Both Conceptual Actives and Reflectives Need models, general frameworks they can relate to ones they have already experienced General Models / Frameworks which shows reasons for change and how frameworks are related to past and future
  27. 27. Spring 2015 27Spring 2011 27 The Development Styles Framework (8 of 8) Influencing Individuals with Different Development Styles Development Style Psychology How to Influence Communications … Follow Ups Conceptual Reflectives Want to be “exposed” to new models which frame new ways then be given an opportunity to “personally” reflect how these new frameworks “fit” into their current ways of thinking Presentations, just-in-time materials, handouts they can take away Opportunities to listen to others talk which allow them to “tune out others” and “tune in” to internal processes Provide general models and frameworks, and allow them time to reflect on them before moving onto concrete examples / tasks Create follow up opportunities in which they can talk what they thinking about, and what they think it means to each of them personally Both Conceptual Actives and Reflectives Need models, general frameworks they can relate to ones they have already experienced General Models / Frameworks which shows reasons for change and how frameworks are related to past and future
  28. 28. Spring 2015 28 Before we move on, where do you fit? Reflect on this, or talk about it with another member of your team Once again, the easiest way to figure this out it to get clear on your own behavior. 1. It could be that you are an “it depends” person, changing your behavior depending on the content. Also, remember that is no “best” here, just patterns of behavior. 2. Also remember that we are all “natural intuitive psychologists”. That means that we assume that others do things in much the same way that we do. That is, we tend to project our Development Style on others. We communicate to them in a way that fits our Development Style. If it is the same as ours, we “click”. If not, we may experience some “difficulties” in our communication effectiveness. Pick which best describes you  And then So that you are clear on your own Development Style Practical Conceptual When you get new information, it makes most sense to you if it is concrete, specific and tied to what you have already done. When you get new information, it makes most sense if it is tied to general models or frameworks that you can connect to the other models or frameworks that you have used to make sense of things in the past. Active You want to be able to talk with others in order to clarify your ideas and thoughts. Things don’t really make sense to you until you have talked them through. Practical Active Conceptual Active Reflective You need a chance to reflect, to process things once they have been presented to you. After you have done so, you are clear on them, and can engage in dialogue with others about them. Practical Reflective Conceptual Reflective
  29. 29. Spring 2015 29 Conscious Communication is a Matter of Planning Content To Fit all Development Styles Plan and deliver communication campaigns which cover all of the possibilities Practical Conceptual Understand best when they receive content that is full of concrete examples that tie to past personal experience Understand best when specific examples are placed or framed by general models that connect to past models that have been used to frame similar circumstances Active Need to talk with others about what they are hearing and seeing to integrate it – to get it 1. Provide both general frameworks and specific examples that fit in them. 2. Tie both to past experiences that the members of the audience have had. 3. Allow people to self-select into “talk” or “reflect” situations. 4. Provide follow up opportunities to talk to “similar” peers about the new information or change required. Reflective Need an opportunity to listen or to read and then have time to reflect on what they are hearing or seeing to integrate it – to get it before talking with others about it or applying it 1. You can’t always know what the Development Style of individuals in your “receiver” audience will be. It is likely that a group will have a more than one, usually all. 2. It’s about effectiveness. Effectiveness increases if you are aware of this need to cover this range of audience members, and use your awareness as a tool while you are developing messages and delivering them.
  30. 30. Spring 2015 30 Putting these Two Frameworks Together …. (1 of 2) The interaction of the two frameworks allows us to think about how to shape different parts of a change roll out. In the moment: Knowing where the person is in the Innovation cycle, and having insight into the person’s Development Style allows us to “flex” to that person’s interaction requirements. In communications: Including elements that align with each of the four Styles maximize impact.
  31. 31. Spring 2015 31 Putting these Two Frameworks Together …. (2 of 2) Development Style Practical Conceptual Place in Diffusion of Innovation Active Reflective Active Reflective Innovators Early Adopters Early Majority Late Majority Laggards If we can identity where individuals or groups fit into this framework, we can “customize” our interactions with them to maximize our influence on them. At each stage of the Innovation Cycle, we can use language that works for all four Development Styles in our communications.
  32. 32. Spring 2015 32 So far … Everything we have covered so far applies to all change oriented work in organizations and communities Now let’s add one more framework …one useful in those project or programs in which Elected Public Officials (politicians) are part of our Stakeholder group
  33. 33. Spring 2015 33 Influencing Elected Politicians (Roelf Woldring) (1 of 7) • Elected Politicians have a real job to do – defined by competing interests among the players in their stakeholder map (see next slide) • Ultimately, politicians work for the “party” – It authorizes their nomination as “candidates” – It funds their election campaigns – It disciplines their membership in the party – Governance structure of the Party • is a mixture of formal (constitution of the party) • and tribal (party executive, “back room party inner circle”, inner circle around elected “leader” of party) • No mention of the “Party” in Canadian constitution
  34. 34. Spring 2015 34 Influencing Elected Politicians (2 of 7) Stakeholder Map of an Elected Politician Elected Politician Electorate Current Voters in Local Riding Others Party Media Future Voters in Local Riding Businesses in Local Riding Community and other Organizations that hold “voters” in Local Riding Local Riding Executive Local Riding Members Party Executive and Back Room “Inner Circle” Party Leader and Leader’s Inner Circle Other Elected Party Members Salaried Party Administrators Elected Politicians from Other Parties Registered Lobbyists (and “unregistered lobbyists”) Government Bureaucrats Political Staffers Working for Member Media Personalities Journalists Editors Other Media Staffers Political Staffers Working for Other Elected Party Members
  35. 35. Spring 2015 35Spring 2011 35 Influencing Elected Politicians (3 of 7) Job Description of Elected Politician • Hold / re-win the seat for the party – Represent Party in Local Riding Electorate meetings and other gatherings of members of Electorate (both inside and outside local riding) – Develop and maintain a “personal influence” network inside the Party, and among the other external “stakeholders” (see previous slide)  Take “stands” approved by Party during House Sessions  Do not “take stands” outside of those communicated or developed in Party “caucus” or communicated by Party Leader (and Party Leader Inner Circle)  Vote with Party with issues defined as “Party Issues”  Vote based on understanding of Local Electorate interests or personal judgment during “free votes”
  36. 36. Spring 2015 36Spring 2011 36 Influencing Elected Politicians (4 of 7) Job Description of Elected Politician continued  Do “work” assigned by Party in a way that reflects Party policy, image, and reputation  Cabinet posts  Oversee operations of Ministry  Align operations of Ministry with Party Policy  Align spending of Ministry with Party Policy (as much as possible)  Avoid “negatives” which reflect badly on Party public image  Committee posts  Other “roles”  Interact with Government Bureaucrats as required by work assigned by Party  Translate Party policy in dialogue with / communications to Government Bureaucrats  Represent the “interests” of the Electorate inside the Party  Speak up for local Electorate interests, issues and concerns during caucus sessions  Speak up based on personal judgment on issues in caucus sessions  Dialogue with other Elected Party members and other Elected Party Members / Party Staff to generate support for “local Electorate interests, issues and concerns” and for “personal issues and concerns”
  37. 37. Spring 2015 37Spring 2011 37 Influencing Elected Politicians (5 of 7) Three Points of Influence on Elected Politicians By Individuals from “Outside” Political Parties • Votes – Comes directly from Elected Politician Job Description • Win / Hold the Seat for the Party • Jobs – National Income is distributed through Job Salaries, Return on Investment and Government Programs in our Society – Jobs have become an important component of competition among Political Parties for votes (Win / Hold the Seat for the Party) • Dollars – Governments manage a major portion of the GDP – Demands on Government, • resulting from Electoral System = need to gain votes, • and past political contracts with Electorate (e.g. Health Care, Education, …) always exceed income available to the Government
  38. 38. Spring 2015 38 Influencing Elected Politicians (6 of 7) Stories to Tell to Get Support from Elected Politicians By Individuals from “Outside” Political Parties Influence Point Generic Story How It Works Votes What we are doing is increasing the perceived satisfaction of local voters in your riding with our program / activity that your Party supports Increases Politician’s perception that more people likely to be satisfied with Party’s programs Jobs What we are doing is increasing the number of jobs in your riding or in a number of ridings Increases Politician’s ability to “credit” Party with action that has led to increase in number of jobs Dollars What we are doing is decreasing: • the need for total government spending in our established program areas • or the unit costs of program delivery in our programs Increases Politician’s ability to “credit” Party with action that shows “fiscal” responsibility “All politics is local” if you cannot make the story local, the Politician cannot tie your story to potential local votes On Election Night, The only thing that counts is the number of votes that win the most seats, not the total number of votes
  39. 39. Spring 2015 39 Influencing Elected Politicians (7 of 7) Who Do You Need To Tell Your Local Stories Too To as many people as you can in the Elected Politician’s Stakeholder Map, as well as the Elected Politician But • Political Staffers, • Other Elected Politicians • Media Personalities / Journalists are secondary keys The best “story teller” is always someone who the Elected Politician sees as a “typical” Current Voter in Local Riding Remember be “Party Agnostic” as you “facilitate” and “shape” these communications
  40. 40. Spring 2015 40 Thank You• If you find this Slide Share post useful: – Click Like on Slide Share so that it gets shared with others or add a comment so that you contribute to the dialogue – Forward it / share it with colleagues use the button on the bottom left of the screen – Embed it in another web site Use the Embed button at the upper right of the screen • Join Roelf’s E-Learning community – Click on the image to the right and get a non-charge copy of the one of the e-books Browse to the KTKHKW web site and view the e-learning programs Click on the banner below to see the course intro’s
  41. 41. Contact Roelf Woldring at 1- 416-427-1567 or roelf@roelfwoldring.com www.roelfwoldring.com www.knowthatknowhowknowwhy.com 41 Soft Skill Development for Working Professionals Be the best team player and manager of others you can be

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