Local Greenhouse Gas Lessons Croton 2009b

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What Village of Croton-on-Hudson is doing on climate action in terms of zoning/planning, GHG inventory, and intermunicipal collaboration.

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Local Greenhouse Gas Lessons Croton 2009b

  1. 1. Greenhouse Gas Local Lessons from the Emissions Baseline Village of Croton-on-Hudson New York Leo Wiegman mayor www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Community-Based Climate Action Strategies 27 October 2009 1 Saturday, October 31, 2009 1
  2. 2. this slide deck presents • part #1: what is a greenhouse gas and why do we care? • part #2: what is Croton doing? • part #2a: some zoning/planning actions • part #2b: baseline emissions inventory • part #2c: working with neighbors • part #3: what can a family do? www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 2 Saturday, October 31, 2009 2
  3. 3. #1: what is greenhouse gas? Concentrations of greenhouse gases from 0 to 2005 400 2000 CH4 1800 1600 CO2 (ppm) and NO2 (ppb) 350 Industrial Age commences 1400 CH4 (ppb) 1200 300 1000 Carbon dioxide (CO2) Nitrous oxide (NO2) 800 Methane (CH4) 250 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Year (IPCC AR4 WG1 FAQ2 2007 www.ipcc.ch) www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 3 Saturday, October 31, 2009 3
  4. 4. #1: Business as Usual, or...? (IPCC AR4 WG1 ch10 2007 www.ipcc.ch) www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 4 Saturday, October 31, 2009 4
  5. 5. #1: Trends exceed projections 10 Actual emissions (CDIAC data) Actual emissions (EIA data) 9 450 ppm scenario CO2 emissions (GtC/year) 650 ppm scenario Range within IPCC SRES 8 emission scenarios 7 6 5 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 (Raupach et al PNAS 2007 www.pnas.org) www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 5 Saturday, October 31, 2009 5
  6. 6. 49.0 Gigatons carbon dioxide equivalents p 50 44.7 GHG sources 39.4 40 35.6 #1: 30 28.7 20 (GtCO2eq/year) 60 10 Gigatons carbon dioxide equivalents per year 50 49.0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2004 44.7 39.4 N2O from agriculture and others 40 35.6 CH4 from agriculture, waste and energy 28.7 30 CO2 from deforestation, decay, and peat CO2 from fossil fuel use and other sources 20 (GtCO2eq/year) 10 1970 1980 1990 2000 2004 N2O from agriculture and others (IPCC AR4 SYR SPM 2007 www.ipcc.ch) www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline energy Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) CH4 from agriculture, waste and Inventory: 6 CO2 from deforestation, decay, and peat Saturday, October 31, 2009 6
  7. 7. Local NY Impact O U R C H A N G I N G N O R T H E A S T C L I M AT E 7 #1: e Climates Upstate New York NYC Tri-State Region 990 •NY winters warmed rapidly by 4°F between 1961–1990 1961–1990 1970-2000. 39 2010–2039 2010–2039 •Coastal Flooding 2040–2069 2040–2069 2040–2069 2070–2090 •Severe Weather 2070–2090 2040–2069 2070–2090 2070–2090 •Disease Vectors ario rio Higher-Emissions Scenario Higher-Emissions Scenario •Asthma Increases •Loss of Agriculture Lower-Emissions Scenario Lower-Emissions Scenario a Eastern Pennsylvania (Frumhoff 2007 Union of Concerned Scientists www.northeastclimateimpacts.org ) Changes in average summer www.crotononhudson-ny.gov heat index—a measure of how Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 7 hot it actually feels, given tem- Saturday, October 31, 2009 perature and humidity—could 7
  8. 8. Why start here? “Create a place, not just a space." –Mark Hutker, AIA www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 8 Saturday, October 31, 2009 8
  9. 9. #2: what Croton is doing... •1. Use smart growth concepts in local zoning and planning; •2. Inventory our greenhouse gas emissions; •3. Build knowledge networks with neighbors.  www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 9 Saturday, October 31, 2009 9
  10. 10. #2: one small example... •Composter can divert 700 lbs of organic waste from the waste stream per year (1/3 of a ton for an average 4 person household). •In June 2009, residents bought 193 composters capable of recycling 135,100 pounds of organic matter into useable soil = about 67.5 tons of matter avoided from the collection process. www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 10 www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Saturday, October 31, 2009 10
  11. 11. #2a: Smart growth concepts TRANSPORTATION ENHANCEMENTS PROGRAM $1.2 Million awarded in 2009 for... Provision of Facilities for Pedestrians and Bicycles www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 11 Saturday, October 31, 2009 11
  12. 12. #2a: Smart growth=Bike-pedestrian friendly connections Safer Harmon-to-Station Connections 2,000 parking spaces at village RR lot 400 yards to commercial district busiest RR station betw. Albany and NYC www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 12 Saturday, October 31, 2009 12
  13. 13. #2a: Smart growth=Transit-oriented development Harmon mixed-use zoning bonuses Offers incentives to redevelop parcels closer to public transportation: 0.8 FAR for mixed use 35 ft ht max 15 ft front setback 1st oor retail-prone (60% glass) shared parking incentives 36 parcels with average assessment year of 1987. 7 minute walk to RR station. SEQRA public hearing 11/2/2009 www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 13 Saturday, October 31, 2009 13
  14. 14. #2a: Smart growth= Careful density = $ in the bank 1 commercial zone parcel: 2 options Current zoning FAR 0.5 Proposed zoning FAR 0.8 with 1 story max yields: with 3 story max yields: - 31 parking spaces for shoppers/owners on + adds 16 parking spaces (50% more!) prime 30,000 sf corner lot. + adds 9,000 sf new space to rent/sell/tax.(60% - 15,000 sf of one story building. more for new building of 24,000 sf) - cost of renovation/redevelopment does not + lowers per square foot construction $. earn enough to pay for itself. + creates positive cash flow for owner. www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 14 Saturday, October 31, 2009 14
  15. 15. Why measure? “If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it." — Lord Kelvin www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 15 Saturday, October 31, 2009 15
  16. 16. #2b: GHG emissions steps Five-Milestone Methodology Five-Milestone Methodology Leadership Commitment Milestone 1 Inventory Emissions Milestone 2 Establish Target Milestone 5 Milestone 3 Monitor/Evaluate Develop Climate Progress Action Plan Milestone 4 Implement Climate Action Plan !!!"#$%&#'()"*+, www.icleiusa.org www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 16 Saturday, October 31, 2009 16
  17. 17. #2b: GHG emissions inventory www.icleiusa.org •110 hours of staff time to complete the emissions inventory using ICLEI method for governmental operations (using 2007 data from village records). •Some surprises: •Water delivery is most costly service •(30% of total energy bill) and 3rd biggest emission source. •Electric power is really expensive •and has gone up steeply since 2007 (even for NYPA customers). www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 17 Saturday, October 31, 2009 17
  18. 18. #2b: GHG report in 1 sentence In 2007 Village of Croton-on-Hudson •spent ~$521,000 on energy •emitted ~1,515 tonnes of CO2e emissions •consumed~17.8 billion Btus from all fuels. Background info on energy costs: •Since 2005, energy overall expenses rose ~20% to 2007. •Since 2007, all fuels have become even more expensive. www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 18 Saturday, October 31, 2009 18
  19. 19. #2b: what’s our tonnes? (table) Summary Report: 2007 Village government greenhouse gas emissions by sector (tonnes & MMBtu) Sectors CO2 N2O CH4 Total gases CO2eq Energy Cost (tonnes) (kg) (kg) (tonnes) (%) (MMBtu) ($) Buildings and Facilities 522 3 43 524 35% 6,525 $ 148,552 Fleet (Vehicle+Transit combined) 412 12 10 414 27% 5,700 $ 126,894 Water Delivery Facilities 368 3 20 369 24% 3,583 $ 149,560 Streetlights & Traffic Signals 184 1 8 185 12% 1,698 $ 88,791 Wastewater Facilities 23 0 1 23 2% 252 $ 9,269 Total 1,513 18 82 1,515 100% 17,757 $ 523,066 www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 19 Saturday, October 31, 2009 19
  20. 20. #2b: what’s our tonnes? pie chart 2007 greenhouse gas emissions by sector (%) Wastewater Facilities 2% $9,269 Streetlights & Traffic Signals 12% $88,791 Buildings & Facilities The total cost of the energy consumed by each sector 35% is displayed, together with the percent of the overall $148,552 Water Delivery Facilities greenhouse gas emissions the energy consumption 24% for that sector produced. We sorted these by largest $ 149,560 to smallest emission source, with building and facilities as the #1 emitting sector. Notice that if we sort by largest to smallest cost, water delivery would Fleet (vehicle + transit) 27% be #1 most expensive sector, followed by buildings $126,894 and facilities. (data is from table in prior slide) www.crotononhudson-ny.gov Lessons from GHG Emissions Baseline Inventory: Communities & Climate Action (Fall 2009) 20 Saturday, October 31, 2009 20

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