Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.

186

Published on

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Desiree Adair Skinner, Dissertation Defense PPT.

Published in: Education, Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
186
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. High School Counselors’ Roles AsPerceived by High School Principalsand Counselors in TexasA Dissertation DefensebyDesiree Adair SkinnerMarch 11, 2010Chair: William Allan Kritsonis, Ph.D.
  • 2. Committee Members William Allan Kritsonis, Ph.D.(Dissertation Chair) Tyrone Tanner, Ed.D(Member) Edward Mason, Ph.D.(Member) Camille Gibson, Ph.D.(Member)
  • 3. Dissertation Defense FormatI. Purpose of the StudyII. Research QuestionsIII. Conceptual FrameworkIV. MethodV. FindingsVI. Previous CFI ResultsVII. AccountabilityVIII. ImplicationsIX. ConclusionsX. Recommendations for Future Research
  • 4. Purpose of the Study The purpose of this study was todescribe the perceptions of highschool principals and high schoolcounselors about the role of highschool counselors.
  • 5. Quantitative ResearchQuestions1. Is there a significant correlationbetween high school counselors’perceptions and expectations onthe Counselor Function Inventory(CFI) scores as it relates to theAmerican School CounselorAssociation (ASCA) standards?
  • 6. Quantitative ResearchQuestions2. Is there a significant correlationbetween high school principals’perceptions and expectations onthe Counselor Function Inventory(CFI) scores as it relates to theAmerican School CounselorAssociation (ASCA) standards?
  • 7. Quantitative ResearchQuestions3. Is there a significant differencebetween high school counselors’and principals’ expectation scoreson the Counselor FunctionInventory (CFI) as it relates to theAmerican School CounselorAssociation (ASCA) standards?
  • 8. Quantitative ResearchQuestions4. Is there a significant differencebetween high school counselors’and principals’ perception scoreson the Counselor FunctionInventory (CFI) as it relates to theAmerican School CounselorAssociation (ASCA) standards?
  • 9. Quantitative ResearchQuestions5. What are the most importantfunctions of the high schoolcounselor as perceived by the highschool principal and counselorbased on the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards?
  • 10. Null Hypothesis Ho1: There is no statisticallysignificant correlation between highschool counselors’ perceptions andexpectations on the CounselorFunction Inventory (CFI) scores as itrelates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 11. Null Hypothesis Ho2: There is no statisticallysignificant correlation between highschool principals’ perceptions andexpectations on the CounselorFunction Inventory (CFI) scores as itrelates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 12. Null Hypothesis Ho3: There is no statisticallysignificant difference between highschool counselors’ and principals’expectation scores on the CounselorFunction Inventory (CFI) as itrelates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 13. Null Hypothesis Ho4: There is no statisticallysignificant difference between highschool counselors’ and principals’perception scores on the CounselorFunction Inventory (CFI) as itrelates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 14. Conceptual Framework Role TheoryRole theory exists when there areinconsistent expectations causingstress, dissatisfaction, and less effectiveperformance (Rizzo, House, & Lirtzman,1970).
  • 15. Conceptual Framework Based on the work of Falls andNichter (2007) “high schoolcounselors are challenged with roleambiguity, role conflict, and workoverload on a consistent basisresulting in exposure to chronic jobstress, which research indicates canlead to burnout” (Nelson, Robles-Pina, & Nichter, 2008, p. 41-42).
  • 16. Method Participants The population was 241 5A high schoolprincipals and counselors, grades 9-12,in Texas. Potential participants=482. 249 participants: 113=principals,136=counselors completed the survey 51.66% return rate
  • 17. Method Modified Counselor FunctionInventory (CFI) selected Modified survey completed onSurveyMonkey
  • 18. Method The survey was modified: Items were chosen to represent theASCA standards Contains 42 questions Validity Established through expert opinion
  • 19. Method Reliability Cronbach alpha, α = .872 Indicates consistency and reliability in whateach survey item tested Replication Maser (Washington-1971) Johnson (Florida-1989) Moore (southwestern Indiana-1997)
  • 20. Method 5-point Likert scale was used1. Counselors have total responsibility2. Have primary responsibility, thoughmay not personally perform thefunction3. Share function with other groups4. Serve as a consultant5. No direct responsibility
  • 21. Method Scores Correlation T-tests Ranking
  • 22. Findings-Question 1: There is a statistically significantcorrelation between high schoolcounselors’ perceptions andexpectations on the CounselorFunction Inventory (CFI) scores as itrelates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 23. Findings-Question 1: This suggests high school counselorsare not in agreement about thefunctions they perceive themselvesperforming and the functions theyexpect themselves to perform. There is a statistically significantdifference between their reportedactions, and what they think theiractions should be.
  • 24. Findings-Question 1: According to Scarborough &Culbreth (2008) experience alsoplays a part of what counselors doand should do. Nelson, Robles-Pina, and Nichter(2008) found that counselors with10 or more years experience have abetter understanding of nationallydefined expectations.
  • 25. Findings-Question 2: There is a statistically significantcorrelation between high schoolprincipals’ perceptions andexpectations on the CounselorFunction Inventory (CFI) scores as itrelates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 26. Findings-Question 2: This suggests that high school principalsare not in agreement about the functionsthey perceive counselors are performingand the functions they expect them toperform. There is a statistically significantdifference between the reported actions,and what the actions should be.
  • 27. Findings-Question 2: Opinions of the counselor’s role may varydue to the everyday needs of theindividual campus (Kirchner & Setchfield,2005). Amatea and Clark (2005) found that thedisagreements between principals couldpossibly come in many forms. Someprincipals do not agree with the value ofthe work responsibilities.
  • 28. Findings-Question 3: There is no statistically significantdifference between high schoolcounselors’ and principals’expectations scores on theCounselor Function Inventory (CFI)as it relates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 29. Findings-Question 3: There is no statistically significantdifference (t = 1.45, p > .05) betweenhigh school counselors’ expectation scoresand principals’ expectation scores;therefore, the null hypothesis cannot berejected. This would suggest that high schoolcounselors and high school principals tendto agree on the functions that high schoolcounselors should be performing.
  • 30. Findings-Question 3: The study conducted by Kirchner andSetchfield (2005) found that counselorsagree regarding duties that are congruentwith the national standards. According to Pérusse, Goodnough,Donegan, and Jones (2004), counselorsand principals believe the nationalstandards should be the underpinning ofcounseling programs.
  • 31. Findings-Question 4: There is a statistically significantdifference between high schoolcounselors’ and principals’perception scores on the CounselorFunction Inventory (CFI) as itrelates to the American SchoolCounselor Association (ASCA)standards.
  • 32. Findings-Question 4: There is a statistically significantdifference (t = 3.39, p < .05) betweenhigh school counselors’ perception scoresand principals’ perception scores;therefore, the null is rejected. This would suggest that high schoolcounselors and high school principals donot agree on the functions that highschool counselors are actually performing.
  • 33. Findings-Question 4: If a principal feels that the counselingprogram will not help the campus to meetfederal and state accountabilityindicators, the principal is going toprioritize and assign duties to maximizethe counselor’s benefit. Chata and Loesch (2007) have stated thatthe most effective way for counselors tofulfill duties is to have a collaborativerelationship with the principal.
  • 34. Findings-Question 5: What are the most importantfunctions of the high schoolcounselor as perceived by the highschool principal and counselor basedon the American School CounselorAssociation (ASCA) standards?
  • 35. Findings-Question 5:1. Assisting students in selecting highschool courses.=80.3%2. Providing the student anopportunity to “talk through hisproblems.”=79.1%3. Counseling with potentialdropouts.=71.5%
  • 36. Findings-Question 5:4. Counseling with studentsconcerning academicfailures.=69.9%5. Counseling with students in regardto educational and vocationalplans.=61.0%6. Checking credits for graduation andcollege entrance.=60.6%
  • 37. Findings-Question 5:7. Counseling with studentsconcerning personaldecisions.=54.6%8. Providing collegeinformation.=41.0%9. Assisting students with collegeplans.=34.5%10. Scheduling new students.=30.1%
  • 38. Previous CFI Results Maser (Washington, 1971)-studiedperceptions of junior high and seniorhigh school administrators,counselors, and teachers. Perceived counselors’ role similarly
  • 39. Previous CFI Results Johnson (Florida, 1989)-analyzedhigh school principals andcounselors agree in their perceptions andexpectations about the functions thatcounselors do and should be doing
  • 40. Previous CFI Results Moore (southwestern Indiana,1997)-analyzed existing and idealcounselor roles as perceived by highschool principals and counselors. similar perceptions and expectations ofwhat counselors do and what theyshould be doing
  • 41. Accountability The ASCA National Model providesopportunities for counselors to use andassess quantitative and qualitative data-gathering techniques (Sabella, 2006). Accountability and achievement create anopportunity for school counselors tobecome more involved in the educationalprocess affecting academic outcomes(Webb, Brigman, & Campbell, 2005).
  • 42. Accountability When school counselors useresearch-based techniques tocounsel students on specific skills,academic achievement and socialperformance increase (Webb,Brigman, & Campbell, 2005).
  • 43. Implications Principals have varying opinions onwhat counselors’ duties entail.Therefore, counselors may developjob survival skills to avoid conflict aswell as frustration with their job.
  • 44. Implications Given that the job duties areunclear, counselors have conformedto the role that principals expect inorder to find job satisfaction.
  • 45. Implications Many counselors find themselvesbogged down with schedule changesand paperwork; not a lot ofcounseling. One might wonder ifmore individual counseling washappening would the achievementgap be impacted.
  • 46. Implications Without proper knowledge ofnational and state expectations,counselors are not used to their fullpotential and students are notserved to the fullest capacity.
  • 47. Conclusions Referring to the ASCA standardsmay alleviate some of the gaps forwhat a counselor should do andactually do on a campus. It isimperative for principals to havecommunication with counselorsregarding campus expectations andperceptions.
  • 48. Conclusions With increased communicationcounselor job duties can be moreclearly defined. Clarity will reducejob anxiety giving counselors asense of purpose.
  • 49. Recommendations forFuture Research A study could be conducted thatwould include the perceptions andexpectations of teachers, students,and parents of the counselors role. A study could be conducted choosingschools of various populations. A study could be conducted in ruralschools.
  • 50. Recommendations forFuture Research A study could be conducted in urbanschools. A study could be conducted in suburbanschools. A study could be conducted whereprincipals and counselors work togetherto establish a comprehensive guidanceand counseling program that is congruentwith the American School CounselorAssociation.
  • 51. Recommendations forFuture Research A study could be conducted on individualcampuses to create, revise, and evaluateguidance and counseling programs toensure congruence with the ASCAstandards. A study could be conducted to determinethe effectiveness of a complete guidanceand counseling program on studentachievement.
  • 52. Recommendations forFuture Research A study could be conducted to determinethe effectiveness of a complete guidanceand counseling program and its impact onstate accountability ratings. A study could be conducted to developappropriate professional development forboth principals and counselors to betterunderstand the role of the counselor.
  • 53. References Amatea, E. S., & Clark, M. A. (2005). Changingschools, changing counselors: A qualitative studyof school administrators conceptions of theschool counselor role. Professional SchoolCounselor, 9, 16-27. Retrieved October 10,2007, fromhttp://vnweb.hwwilsonweb.com/hww/Journals Chata, C. C., & Loesch, L. C. (2007). Futureschool principals views of the roles ofprofessional school counselors. ProfessionalSchool Counseling, 11, 35-41. RetrievedNovember 24, 2007, from EBSCOHost database.
  • 54. References Falls, L. & Nichter, M. (2007). High schoolcounselors lived experiences of burnout: Aphenomenological study. Professional SchoolCounseling, 5, 47-55. Retrieved May 13, 2009,fromhttp://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n13.pdf. Johnson, T. H. (1989). An analysis of senior highschool guidance counselor role perceptions andexpectations by high school principals andguidance counselors in Florida school districts(Doctoral dissertation). Available from ProQuestDissertations and Theses database (UMI No.8917455).
  • 55. References Kirchner, G. L., & Setchfield, M. S.(2005). School counselors and schoolprincipals perceptions of the schoolcounselors role. [Electronic version].Education, 126, 10-16. Maser, A. L. (1971). Counselor function insecondary schools. The School Counselor,12, 367-372.
  • 56. References Moore, L. G. (1997). An analysis of existing andideal guidance counselor roles as perceived byhigh school principals and counselors insouthwestern Indiana (Doctoral dissertation).Available from ProQuest Dissertations andTheses database (UMI No. 9724573). Nelson, J., Robles-Pina, R., & Nichter, M. (2008).An analysis of Texas high school counselorsroles: actual and preferred counseling activities.Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice,Theory and Research, 36(1), 30-46.. Retrieved,from EBSCOHost database.
  • 57. References Pérusse, R., Goodnough, G. E., Donegan,J., & Jones, C. (2004). Perceptions ofschool counselors and school principalsabout the national standards for schoolcounseling programs and thetransforming school counseling initiative.Professional School Counseling, 7, 152-161. Retrieved November 22, 2007, fromEBSCOHost database.
  • 58. References Ponec, D. L., & Brock, B. L. (2000). Relationshipsamong elementary school counselors andprincipals: A unique bond. Professional SchoolCounseling, 3, 208-217. Retrieved July 20, 2007,from EBSCOHost Academic Search Premierdatabase. Rizzo, J. R., House, R. J., & Lirtzman, S. I.(1970). Role conflict and ambiguity in complexorganizations. Administrative Science Quarterly,15, 150-163. Retrieved October 16, 2007 fromhttp://www.jstor.org
  • 59. References Sabella, R. A. (2006). The ASCA nationalschool counseling research center: A briefhistory and agenda. Professional SchoolCounseling, 9, 412-415. Scarborough, J. L., & Culbreth, J. R.(2002). Examining discrepancies betweenactual and preferred practice of schoolcounselors. Journal of Counseling andDevelopment, 86, 446-459.
  • 60. References Webb, L. D., Brigman, G. A., & Campbell,C. (2005). Linking school counselors andstudent success: A replication of thestudent success skills approach targetingthe academic social competence ofstudents. Professional School Counseling,8, 407-413. Retrieved August 13, 2007,from EBSCOHost database.

×