Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
<ul><li>AN ANALYSIS OF FACTORS INFLUENCING SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS’ RETENTION AND ATTRITION IN TEXAS PUBLIC SCHOOLS  A ...
Purpose of the Study <ul><li>Add to the body of research that will help identify reasons for the mass exodus of special ed...
Presentation Format <ul><li>Theoretical Framework </li></ul><ul><li>Research Questions (Quantitative and Qualitative) </li...
Theoretical Framework School  Climate Factors Parental Support Factors Mentors  and  Colleagues  Support Factors Central  ...
Quantitative Research Questions <ul><li>Are  </li></ul><ul><li>Campus administrative support </li></ul><ul><li>Central off...
Null Hypotheses <ul><li>There is no statistically significant difference in </li></ul><ul><li>teachers’ scores of  </li></...
Qualitative Research Questions <ul><li>What do special education teachers who stay or leave special education describe as ...
Qualitative Research Questions <ul><li>What specific things are done to enhance the involvement and commitment of special ...
Quantitative Methods
Quantitative Method <ul><li>Descriptive statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Comparison of means (Independent t-tests) </li></ul>
Quantitative Method <ul><li>Independent Variable –  </li></ul><ul><li>Special education teachers who remain and those who ...
Quantitative Method <ul><li>Subjects of the Study </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All accessible current and former special educatio...
Quantitative Method <ul><li>94 current special education teachers responded out of 200. </li></ul><ul><li>38 former specia...
Quantitative Method <ul><li>Instrumentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Six point Likert- type instrument </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
Pilot Study   <ul><li>Campus administrative support factors .848 </li></ul><ul><li>Central office support factors .908 </l...
Major Quantitative Findings
Major Findings Research Question 1  <ul><li>Are campus administrative support factors associated with special </li></ul><u...
Major Findings  Research Question 2 <ul><li>Are central office support factors associated with special education </li></ul...
Major Findings  Research Question 3 <ul><li>Are mentors and colleagues support factors associated with special </li></ul><...
Major Findings  Research Question 4 <ul><li>Are parental support factors associated with special education </li></ul><ul><...
Major Findings  Research Question 5 <ul><li>Are school climate factors associated with special education teachers’ </li></...
Results of Major Quantitative Findings <ul><li>Research question 1 Campus Administrative Support :  </li></ul><ul><li>Find...
Qualitative Findings
Qualitative Subjects <ul><li>Subjects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>10 current special education teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Qualitative Research Question 6 <ul><li>What do special education teachers who stay or  </li></ul><ul><li>leave special ed...
Emergent Themes: Important Factors   <ul><li>Current Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships with colleagues </li></ul><u...
Qualitative Research Question 7 <ul><li>What specific things are done to enhance the </li></ul><ul><li>involvement and com...
Qualitative Research Question 7 <ul><li>Campus administration support </li></ul><ul><li>“ My decision to remain in special...
Integration of Quantitative Findings, Qualitative Findings and Review of Literature
Research Question 1    Campus Administrative Support   Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative and Qualitative Findings ...
Research Question 2  Central Office Support Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative findings were not consistent with th...
Research Question 3 Mentors and Colleagues Support Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative and Qualitative findings were...
Research Question 4 Parental Support Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative findings in this study were consistent with...
Research Question 5 School Climate Factors Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative findings were inconclusive. </li></ul...
A Review of the Quantitative and Qualitative Findings
Findings <ul><li>Quantitative Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Significant Factors </li></ul><ul><li>Campus administrative </li>...
Recommendations
Recommendations <ul><li>Campus Administration Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus administrators should have an open door...
Recommendations <ul><li>Central Office Administrators Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Central office administrators should p...
Recommendations <ul><li>Mentors and Colleagues Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues should provide assista...
Recommendations <ul><li>Parental Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents should support teachers.  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
Recommendations for Further Studies <ul><li>To make this study more representative of special education teachers who have ...
Recommendations for Further Studies <ul><li>Explore “other” factors that teachers listed as </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for ...
Theoretical Framework School  Climate Factors Parental Support Factors Mentors  and  Colleagues  Support Factors Central  ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Dr. Lautrice Nickson, PhD Dissertation Defense, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Committee

1,105

Published on

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, PhD Dissertation Chair for Dr. Lautrice Nickson, PhD Program in Educational Leadership, PVAMU, Member of the Texas A&M University System.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,105
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Teacher retention and attrition are both phenomena that have influenced the education community for many years. According to Darling-Hammond, 2003 Quote each year the number of teachers entering the workforce is increasing. However, it seems that teachers already in the workforce are leaving faster than they can be replaced. End Quote As a general education teacher it was imperative for me to collaborate with special education teachers in order to provide the best education for my students with special needs. I found this difficult due to the fact that each year there was a new special education teacher. Once I became an administrator I also found this to be true. Many special educators that I worked with were burden with unreasonable demands from parents as well as the school district. Due to these pressures many special educators become burned out and leave the field of special education before their third year of teaching. Therefore the purpose of this dissertation is to
  • More specifically the study identifies important factors that influence special education teachers’ decisions to remain in or leave the field of special education .
  • The dissertation defense format is as follows theoretical framework, research questions (quantitative and qualitative) followed by quantitative methods, quantitative findings and then qualitative research questions and findings will be presented. Then presentation will conclude with an integration of the quantitative, qualitative data and the review of literature and recommendations.
  • This theoretical framework is based on general education literature dealing with teachers’ retention and attrition and has transferability to special education teachers’ retention and attrition because both groups are exposed to the same factors. The theoretical framework illustrates five of the many factors that may influence special education teachers retention and attrition. Factors included in this study were campus administrative support, central office support, mentors and colleagues support, parental support, and school climate factors.
  • Each bulleted item indicates each of the five quantitative research questions in this study that focused on support factors that influence special education teachers’ retention and attrition.
  • For each quantitative research question a null hypothesis was generated.
  • Qualitative data were gathered through interviews with current and former special education teachers to answer the question.
  • Research question seven was only answered by current special education teachers.
  • Quantitative data were reported using descriptive statistics and analyzed by comparing means. These means were compared by using independent t-tests.
  • Special education teachers’ retention and attrition was the independent variable in this study. Dependent variables were Campus administrative support factors, central office support factors, mentors and colleagues support factors, parental support factors, and school climate factors.
  • A total of 300 surveys were distributed. 200 to current special educators and 100 to former special educators. The return rate on the survey was 61%. This rate is acceptable given the fact that special education teachers received the survey during the first month of the school year. A total of 132 participants were included in the study.
  • A 50 item survey was designed by the researcher to gather information regarding five factors influencing special education teachers’ retention and attrition.
  • Since the instrument was constructed by the researcher a pilot study was conducted with 32 special educators to ensure validity and reliability. Reliability was ensured by running a Cronbach’s alpha on each factor as well as the total instrument. Factors on the survey were considered reliable if the Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for each factor as well as for the total instrument were .70 or better. To ensure validity participants in the pilot study were asked to make comments on any questions that needed clarification. They were also asked to make suggestions on any improvements that needed to be made to the instrument. Each participant commented the questions were clear and did not need clarification. They also stated they did not notice anything that needed to be changed on the instrument.
  • P is less than .05 which indicates that there is a statistically significant difference. An effect size of .45 was calculated which indicates in this study that campus administrative support had a slight effect on special educators retention and attrition.
  • P is greater than .05 which indicates that there is not a statistically significant differences. This means that in this study central office support did not have an effect on special education teachers retention and attrition.
  • P is less than .05 which means that there is a statistically significant difference. An effect size of .64 was calculated which indicates that in this study mentors and colleagues had a huge effect on special education teachers retention and attrition.
  • P is less than .05 which indicates that there is a statistically significant difference. An effect size of .37 was calculated which means in this study parental support had a slight influence on special education teachers retention and attrition.
  • According to the statistical analysis the difference in the means is not significant. However because the means are both high and as you’ll recall from the instrument the highest score a factor could have was 60. Because the means are high for both groups I am concluding that school climate factors are inconclusive. (p=.167)
  • Interviews were conducted with one current and one former special educator from each district included in the study in order to reduce bias.
  • Both current and former special educators were asked the question. Three themes emerged from the interviews.
  • Research question 7 was only addressed by current special educators.
  • Comments included Campus administration support Without my colleagues I would have quit after my first year. Mentor and collegial support “ My decision to remain in special education is based on the support of my principal” Student interest Each year I am able to see the growth that my students make and I like being a part of that”
  • The quantitative and qualitative findings of this study show that the most important role of the administrator is to support and understand special education teachers’ roles.
  • In the quantitative portion of this study central office support was not considered to be a factor that influenced special educators’ decisions to remain or leave the field of special education. However, the qualitative portion provided results that show that central office support is crucial to special education teachers decisions to remain or leave the field of special education.
  • Both the quantitative and qualitative findings of this study indicated that special educators were influenced to remain or leave the field of special education due to the support that they did or did not receive from mentors and colleagues. Cohen (2005) Reported that
  • Quantitative data in this study indicated that parental support was influential in special education teachers retention and attrition. However, qualitative findings in this study were not significant. George and colleagues in addition to Platt and Olson conducted surveys concerning parental support and teacher retention. Of the teachers surveyed George found that 23% … Platt and Olson (1990) found that 53%
  • Quantitative findings in this study were inconclusive due to the high means for both groups. The Qualitative findings in this study were not significant. Other studies have shown that school climate may influence educators retention and attrition. Cotton 2004 states
  • The findings suggest that supportive campus administrators enhance special education teachers’ decisions to remain in special education. Based on the key findings from this study, it is recommended that campus administrators should incorporate the following behaviors in their practice in order to develop a supportive working relationship with their staff.
  • In order to increase special education teacher retention central office administrators should
  • Mentors and colleagues support have a direct influence on special educators’ decisions to remain or leave the field of special education. Based on the key findings from this study, it is recommended that mentors and colleagues should incorporate the following behaviors in their practice in order to develop stronger relationships with their colleagues.
  • In order to increase special education teacher retention parents should
  • Interviewing campus administrators, central office administrators and parents may provide a deeper understanding of how they contribute to the retention and attrition of special education teachers. These interviews could help discover other effective practices that may enhance retention and decrease special education teachers’ attrition.
  • According to the literature these factors were influential in determining teachers’ retention and attrition however in this study three of the five factors were statistically significant. These factors were campus administrative support, mentor and colleague support, and parental support.
  • Transcript of "Dr. Lautrice Nickson, PhD Dissertation Defense, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Committee"

    1. 1. <ul><li>AN ANALYSIS OF FACTORS INFLUENCING SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS’ RETENTION AND ATTRITION IN TEXAS PUBLIC SCHOOLS A Dissertation Defense </li></ul><ul><li>by </li></ul><ul><li>LAUTRICE </li></ul><ul><li>MCCARTY NICKSON </li></ul><ul><li>William Allan Kritsonis, PhD Dissertation Committee Member </li></ul>
    2. 2. Purpose of the Study <ul><li>Add to the body of research that will help identify reasons for the mass exodus of special education teachers after three years. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify important factors that influence special education teachers’ decisions to remain in or leave the field of special education . </li></ul>
    3. 3. Presentation Format <ul><li>Theoretical Framework </li></ul><ul><li>Research Questions (Quantitative and Qualitative) </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative Methods </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative Major Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative Emergent Themes </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative Major Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate Quantitative and Qualitative findings with literature </li></ul><ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul>
    4. 4. Theoretical Framework School Climate Factors Parental Support Factors Mentors and Colleagues Support Factors Central Office Support Factors Campus Administrative Support Factors Teachers’ Retention and Attrition
    5. 5. Quantitative Research Questions <ul><li>Are </li></ul><ul><li>Campus administrative support </li></ul><ul><li>Central office support </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues support </li></ul><ul><li>Parental support </li></ul><ul><li>School climate </li></ul><ul><li>factors associated with special education </li></ul><ul><li>teachers’ retention and attrition in the field of </li></ul><ul><li>special education. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Null Hypotheses <ul><li>There is no statistically significant difference in </li></ul><ul><li>teachers’ scores of </li></ul><ul><li>Campus administrative support </li></ul><ul><li>Central office support </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues support </li></ul><ul><li>Parental support </li></ul><ul><li>School climate </li></ul><ul><li>factors between special education teachers who </li></ul><ul><li>remain in special education and those who leave </li></ul><ul><li>the field of special education. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Qualitative Research Questions <ul><li>What do special education teachers who stay or leave special education describe as the most important factors that influence their decisions to remain in or leave special education? </li></ul>
    8. 8. Qualitative Research Questions <ul><li>What specific things are done to enhance the involvement and commitment of special education teachers who stay in the field of special education? </li></ul>
    9. 9. Quantitative Methods
    10. 10. Quantitative Method <ul><li>Descriptive statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Comparison of means (Independent t-tests) </li></ul>
    11. 11. Quantitative Method <ul><li>Independent Variable – </li></ul><ul><li>Special education teachers who remain and those who leave. </li></ul><ul><li>Dependent Variables – </li></ul><ul><li>Campus administrative support factors </li></ul><ul><li>Central office support factors </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues support factors </li></ul><ul><li>Parental support factors </li></ul><ul><li>School climate factors </li></ul>
    12. 12. Quantitative Method <ul><li>Subjects of the Study </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All accessible current and former special education teachers in Texas public schools with three years or fewer experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Grades K through 5 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each school district had a total student enrollment greater than 5,000 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>10 school districts in Southwest Texas </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Quantitative Method <ul><li>94 current special education teachers responded out of 200. </li></ul><ul><li>38 former special education teachers responded out of 100 </li></ul>
    14. 14. Quantitative Method <ul><li>Instrumentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Six point Likert- type instrument </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers’ Retention and Attrition Factors Survey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instrument Measured Support from </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Campus administrators </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Central office administrators </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Parents </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>School climate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Possible Range 10-60 </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Pilot Study <ul><li>Campus administrative support factors .848 </li></ul><ul><li>Central office support factors .908 </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues support factors .961 </li></ul><ul><li>Parental support factors .819 </li></ul><ul><li>School climate factors .809 </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers’ Retention and Attrition Factors Survey .959 </li></ul>
    16. 16. Major Quantitative Findings
    17. 17. Major Findings Research Question 1 <ul><li>Are campus administrative support factors associated with special </li></ul><ul><li>education teachers’ retention and attrition in the field of special </li></ul><ul><li>education? </li></ul><ul><li>Mean score for campus administrative support factors </li></ul><ul><li>Current Special Education Teachers= 43.12 </li></ul><ul><li>Former Special Education Teachers= 38.37 </li></ul><ul><li>Mean difference of 4.75 </li></ul><ul><li>p=.032 </li></ul><ul><li>p<.05* </li></ul><ul><li>effect size = .45 </li></ul>
    18. 18. Major Findings Research Question 2 <ul><li>Are central office support factors associated with special education </li></ul><ul><li>teachers’ retention and attrition in the field of special education? </li></ul><ul><li>Mean score for central office support factors </li></ul><ul><li>Current Special Education Teachers= 37.55 </li></ul><ul><li>Former Special Education Teachers= 34.66 </li></ul><ul><li>Mean difference of 2.89 </li></ul><ul><li>p=.159 </li></ul><ul><li>p<.05* </li></ul>
    19. 19. Major Findings Research Question 3 <ul><li>Are mentors and colleagues support factors associated with special </li></ul><ul><li>education teachers’ retention and attrition in the field of special </li></ul><ul><li>education? </li></ul><ul><li>Mean score for mentors and colleagues support factors </li></ul><ul><li>Current Special Education Teachers= 41.50 </li></ul><ul><li>Former Special Education Teachers= 31.82 </li></ul><ul><li>Mean difference= 9.68 </li></ul><ul><li>p=.001 </li></ul><ul><li>p<.05* </li></ul><ul><li>effect size=.64 </li></ul>
    20. 20. Major Findings Research Question 4 <ul><li>Are parental support factors associated with special education </li></ul><ul><li>teachers’ retention and attrition in the field of special education? </li></ul><ul><li>Mean Score for Parental Support Factors </li></ul><ul><li>Current Special Education Teachers= 38.15 </li></ul><ul><li>Former Special Education Teachers= 42.16 </li></ul><ul><li>Mean difference= 4.01 </li></ul><ul><li>p=.048 </li></ul><ul><li>p<.05* </li></ul><ul><li>effect size=.37 </li></ul>
    21. 21. Major Findings Research Question 5 <ul><li>Are school climate factors associated with special education teachers’ </li></ul><ul><li>retention and attrition in the field of special education? </li></ul><ul><li>Mean Score for School Climate Factors </li></ul><ul><li>Current Special Education Teachers= 46.39 </li></ul><ul><li>Former Special Education Teachers= 43.87 </li></ul><ul><li>Mean difference= 2.52 </li></ul><ul><li>p=.167 </li></ul><ul><li>p<.05* </li></ul>
    22. 22. Results of Major Quantitative Findings <ul><li>Research question 1 Campus Administrative Support : </li></ul><ul><li>Findings were significant </li></ul><ul><li>Research question 2 Central Office Support : </li></ul><ul><li>Findings were not significant </li></ul><ul><li>Research question 3 Mentors and Colleagues Support : </li></ul><ul><li>Findings were significant </li></ul><ul><li>Research question 4 Parental Support : </li></ul><ul><li>Findings were significant </li></ul><ul><li>Research question 5 School Climate Factors : </li></ul><ul><li>Findings were inconclusive </li></ul>
    23. 23. Qualitative Findings
    24. 24. Qualitative Subjects <ul><li>Subjects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>10 current special education teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>10 former special education teachers </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Qualitative Research Question 6 <ul><li>What do special education teachers who stay or </li></ul><ul><li>leave special education describe as the most </li></ul><ul><li>important factors that influence their decision to </li></ul><ul><li>remain in or leave special education? </li></ul>
    26. 26. Emergent Themes: Important Factors <ul><li>Current Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships with colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Support of campus administrators </li></ul><ul><li>Vested interest in students </li></ul><ul><li>Former Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>The need for campus administrative support </li></ul><ul><li>The desire for collaboration with colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>The lack of assistance from central office </li></ul>
    27. 27. Qualitative Research Question 7 <ul><li>What specific things are done to enhance the </li></ul><ul><li>involvement and commitment of special education </li></ul><ul><li>teachers who stay in the profession? </li></ul>
    28. 28. Qualitative Research Question 7 <ul><li>Campus administration support </li></ul><ul><li>“ My decision to remain in special education is based on the </li></ul><ul><li>support of my principal.” </li></ul><ul><li>Mentor and colleague support </li></ul><ul><li>“ Without my colleagues I would have quit after my first </li></ul><ul><li>year.” </li></ul><ul><li>Student interest </li></ul><ul><li>“ Each year I am able to see the growth that my students </li></ul><ul><li>make and I like being a part of that.” </li></ul>
    29. 29. Integration of Quantitative Findings, Qualitative Findings and Review of Literature
    30. 30. Research Question 1 Campus Administrative Support Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative and Qualitative Findings in this study were </li></ul><ul><li>consistent with the findings in the literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Marsal (2001) The absence of administrative support is </li></ul><ul><li>considered a cause for leaving the profession. </li></ul><ul><li>Gersten (2001) Principal or administrative support plays a </li></ul><ul><li>very important role in the retention of teachers. Understanding </li></ul><ul><li>specific ways that principals can support teachers help reduce </li></ul><ul><li>the frustrations teachers experience. </li></ul>
    31. 31. Research Question 2 Central Office Support Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative findings were not consistent with the literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative findings were consistent with the literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Gersten, et al. (2001) found that central office administrators </li></ul><ul><li>exerted an indirect influence on attrition via professional </li></ul><ul><li>development opportunities and stress related role design. </li></ul><ul><li>Billingsley, et al.(1995) Conducted a study that found that 25% </li></ul><ul><li>of those who left teaching were influenced to leave due </li></ul><ul><li>to their dissatisfaction with central administration support. </li></ul>
    32. 32. Research Question 3 Mentors and Colleagues Support Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative and Qualitative findings were consistent </li></ul><ul><li>with the literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Cohen (2005) New teachers are more likely to continue </li></ul><ul><li>teaching in their schools of origin, when they receive </li></ul><ul><li>support from mentors and colleagues. </li></ul><ul><li>Darling-Hammond (2003) Young teachers not only stay in </li></ul><ul><li>the profession at higher rates due to mentors and colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>support but they also become competent more quickly than </li></ul><ul><li>those who must learn by trial and error. </li></ul>
    33. 33. Research Question 4 Parental Support Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative findings in this study were consistent with the </li></ul><ul><li>literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative findings in this study were not consistent with the </li></ul><ul><li>literature. </li></ul><ul><li>George, et al. (1992) 23% of teachers who intended to stay </li></ul><ul><li>indicated receiving adequate support from parents, </li></ul><ul><li>compared to a mere 3% of those who intended to leave. </li></ul><ul><li>Platt and Olson (1990) 53% of educators surveyed </li></ul><ul><li>indicated that &quot;lack of support&quot; from parents was a reason for </li></ul><ul><li>attrition. </li></ul>
    34. 34. Research Question 5 School Climate Factors Review of Literature <ul><li>Quantitative findings were inconclusive. </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative findings were not consistent with the literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton (2004) Positive, safe, secure learning environments </li></ul><ul><li>and nurturing school climates are critical to reducing teacher </li></ul><ul><li>attrition. </li></ul><ul><li>Billingsley (2004) Teachers who view school climate </li></ul><ul><li>positively are more likely to stay or indicate intent to stay than </li></ul><ul><li>those who have less positive views. </li></ul>
    35. 35. A Review of the Quantitative and Qualitative Findings
    36. 36. Findings <ul><li>Quantitative Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Significant Factors </li></ul><ul><li>Campus administrative </li></ul><ul><li>support </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors and Colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>support </li></ul><ul><li>Parental Support </li></ul><ul><li>Factor that was not </li></ul><ul><li>Significant </li></ul><ul><li>Central office support </li></ul><ul><li>Inconclusive Factor </li></ul><ul><li>School Climate </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Significant Factors </li></ul><ul><li>Campus administrative support </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues support </li></ul><ul><li>Central office support </li></ul><ul><li>Factors that were not Significant </li></ul><ul><li>Parental support </li></ul><ul><li>School climate </li></ul>
    37. 37. Recommendations
    38. 38. Recommendations <ul><li>Campus Administration Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus administrators should have an open door policy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognition should be given to teachers by campus administrators. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus administrators should assist teachers in solving problems. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus administrators should assist teachers in the decision making process. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus administrators should provide teacher assistants who can help with certain task. </li></ul></ul>
    39. 39. Recommendations <ul><li>Central Office Administrators Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Central office administrators should provide guidance in teachers’ professional growth. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Central office administrators should reduce the large amounts of paperwork that special education teachers are required by the district to complete. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Central office administrators should implement effective mentor programs for new teachers. </li></ul></ul>
    40. 40. Recommendations <ul><li>Mentors and Colleagues Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues should provide assistance with classroom management. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues should allow teachers to express their feelings and ideas. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues should assist teachers in solving problems. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentors and colleagues should provide teachers with ideas for lesson plans. </li></ul></ul>
    41. 41. Recommendations <ul><li>Parental Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents should support teachers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents should respect teachers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents should treat teachers as professionals. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents should have realistic expectations of teachers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents should feel responsible for the way their children perform in school. </li></ul></ul>
    42. 42. Recommendations for Further Studies <ul><li>To make this study more representative of special education teachers who have remained in or left the field of special education, future studies should include special education teachers who teach students in 6th-12th grade. </li></ul><ul><li>Given that school climate factors were inconclusive in </li></ul><ul><li>this study, but have proven to be significant in other studies, school climate factors should be explored further. </li></ul><ul><li>Interviewing campus administrators, central office administrators and parents may provide a deeper understanding of how they contribute to the retention and attrition of special education teachers . </li></ul>
    43. 43. Recommendations for Further Studies <ul><li>Explore “other” factors that teachers listed as </li></ul><ul><li>reasons for their decisions to either remain in or </li></ul><ul><li>leave the field of special education. </li></ul><ul><li>Student interest </li></ul><ul><li>Personal factors </li></ul><ul><li>Job satisfaction </li></ul>
    44. 44. Theoretical Framework School Climate Factors Parental Support Factors Mentors and Colleagues Support Factors Central Office Support Factors Campus Administrative Support Factors Teachers’ Retention and Attrition
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×