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IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
IKO Blueprint for Roofing
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IKO Blueprint for Roofing

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  • 1. Blueprint for Roofing Shingle Application Guide
  • 2. Table of Contents Introduction 4 Part 1 Roof Types and Definitions 4 Part 2 Measurements and Materials 5 Part 3 Tool Requirements and Preparation 7 Part 4 Safety 8 Part 5 Deck Preparation and Roof Repair 9 Part 6 Drip Edges, Eave Protection and Underlayment 10 Part 7 Valley Construction 13 Part 8 All Shingle Application 14 A Armourshake Application 15 B Crowne Slate Application 16 C Cambridge/Grandeur Application 17 D Royal Estate Application 18 E Marathon Application 19 Part 9 Re-Roofing 20 Part 10 Low Slope - Roof-Fast Application 22 Part 11 Ventilation 25 Part 12 Flashings 27 Part 13 Hips and Ridges 30 Part 14 Inspection and Clean Up 32 Part 15 Roof Care and Maintenance 32 Part 16 Products 32 Glossary 36 Shingle Application Guide 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS
  • 3. INTRODUCTION • Play the program modules through completely. • Play them a second time and compare the information with the installation instructions printed on the bundle wrappers and information available through our website, www.iko.com . If you are a professional roofing contractor, consider joining IKO’s Shield Pro Plus Contractor Program that has been developed to help increase sales, become more profitable and expand your business opportunities; this program will help set you apart from your competitors. As a member of the elite Shield Pro Plus program, you will be given exclusive access to IKO’s Extended Iron Clad Protection, customized marketing tools to assist in promoting your business and an online tool with the ability to order warranties and access training tools from the comfort of your office. For additional information or to obtain an enrollment package, please contact your local IKO sales representative. Note: All safety guidelines outlined by Government Safety and Fall Protection standards must be followed at all times. PART 1 ROOF TYPES AND DEFINITIONS Most homes will have one of these roof styles: The Shed Roof The Hip Roof or Cottage Roof The Gable Roof The Gambrel Roof Every roof has similar features. For example, the ridge is at the top. The eaves are the horizontal, lower edges of a sloped roof. The hip runs from the ridge to the eaves on a Cottage Style Roof. A valley is the intersection of two sloping roof planes. 4 INTRODUCTION
  • 4. Eaves Hips RidgesRake Edges Valleys & Dormers Low Pitch Areas Part 2 Measurements and Materials Calculations for square footage of the roofing surface can be made by simply adding up the areas of the various roof sections. The sum of the total area is then divided by the coverage of each bundle of shingles. Typically, an average 3-tab bundle covers 3 m2 (32.3 square feet), while our architectural shingle bundles vary between 1.86 m2 and 3.1 m2 (20 and 33.3 square feet). It is advisable to add ten to fifteen percent to this area for material waste or loss based on your roof style. When using underlayment, the square measure of the roof may be used again to determine the number of rolls of underlayment required. We recommend our Number 15 Plain Asphalt Felt or RoofGard-SB or RoofGard-Cool Grey synthetic underlayment for this job. Drip Edging requirements are determined by measuring the lengths of the eaves and rake edges. An open metal valley flashing is recommended for the protection of valley areas. Depending on the roof design and the shingle chosen, closed cut and woven valleys may also be acceptable. A “pitch finder” tool can also be useful to measure the slope of the roof. You can determine the roof area by measuring the horizontal area of the roof or attic floor, and then multiplying by a factor which compensates for the slope of a roof. For ice dam protection along the eaves (or anywhere that is susceptible to water penetration), you’ll need IKO’s GoldShield Premium Ice & Water Protector, ArmourGard Ice & Water Protector, or StormShield Standard Ice & Water Protector. Asphalt plastic cement is used to seal at vents, stacks, or chimneys. 5 Measurements and Materials PART 2
  • 5. IKO’s Ice & Water Protectors are modified bitumen roll roofing products with a self-adhesive backing that, once applied correctly, will provide superior protection against wind-driven rain and ice dams. Galvanized roofing nails are the best fastener to use for roofing, and they should be long enough to penetrate through the shingles and into the deck approximately 19 mm (¾") and through the deck if it is plywood or OSB. Nails no less than 6 mm (¼") longer will be required for capping the hips and ridges. IKO recommends our PRO 4 Roofing system. Shingles alone are sometimes not enough to protect your home. IKO has developed a superior multi-layered roofing system incorporating our industry-leading products. IKO’s Pro 4 Roofing System is setting the standard in protecting your home. IKO’s Shingles - Crowne Slate, Armourshake, Royal Estate, Cambridge, Grandeur and Marathon shingles are created using the industry’s most advanced technology and selected by consumers who demand the best in terms of quality, durability and value. Along with one of IKO’s quality shingles, your Pro 4 System includes these accessory products; • Eave Protection - GoldShield, ArmourGard, or StormShield Ice & Water Protectors. IKO’s Ice & Water Protectors provide a second line of defense against water penetration due to ice dams or wind-driven rain and the costly damage it can cause. This product is strongly recommended for sealing around vents, low pitch areas, ridges, hips, rake edges, chimneys, dormers, vent stacks, and skylights. • Underlayment - Asphalt Saturated Felt, RoofGard-SB or RoofGard-Cool Grey Underlayments, Use an asphalt saturated felt underlayment, or our innovative RoofGard-SB or RoofGard‑Cool Grey synthetic underlayment for total deck protection. • Roof Starters - Leading Edge Plus Starter Strips. Fast, Easy and Convenient. IKO’s Starter Strips are already cut to size saving valuable time during the installation of the first course of shingles. Compatible with all existing IKO Shingles, Leading Edge Plus includes a sealant strip at the bottom edge allowing for a tight seal. 6 PART 2 Measurements and Materials
  • 6. • Ridge Cap Shingles - Hip and Ridge, Hip & Ridge 12 Cap Shingles or Ultra HPTM High Profile Ridge Cap Shingles. Ridge cap shingles are required where roof planes meet, and provide additional protection along these high stress areas of the roof, enhancing your home’s aesthetic appeal by accentuating the roof line. Part 3 Tool Requirements and Preparation Proper and safe tools are the key to any successful job. • Ladders should always be sturdy and long enough to reach the roof area at the proper angle, approximately one quarter of the vertical height out from the wall and should extend about 1 m (3') above the eaves. Make sure your ladder or scaffolding is tied off at the roof edge and all locking devices are secured. • Vertical and horizontal chalk lines are applied to ensure accurate shingle alignment over the roof surface. • The roofing knife blade is hooked for cutting and fitting asphalt shingles. • The hammer may either be a well-balanced claw hammer or a specially designed roofer’s hatchet. • You will also need a nail apron and perhaps a pair of knee pads. • A caulking gun, putty knife or pointed trowel are used for applying the asphalt plastic cement. • Tin snips will be used to cut metal flashing materials. 7 Tool Requirements and Preparation PART 3
  • 7. • A circular saw may be required for repairing or replacing damaged decking. • A pry-bar is a handy tool for lifting hard to get at shingles and flashings. • A square-edge shovel or pitch fork is an excellent tool for removing old shingles. • Galvanized roofing nails are the best fastener to use for roofing ensuring that they are driven straight so that the nail head is flush with the shingle surface. • Protect shrubbery, air conditioners, bay windows or other protrusions from falling debris by using tarps or sheets of plywood. • And a good-sized waste receptacle should be placed conveniently below the area being worked on. Be aware of those working with and around you. Make sure that everyone knows how to properly use the tools of trade, both manual and power. Part 4 Safety Proper preparation and careful attention to what you are doing are important considerations for any undertaking. Learn and adhere to Government Safety and Fall Protection standards. Certain jurisdictions may require the shingle applicator to use fall arrest safety equipment when on roofs of certain heights and slopes. IKO recommends contacting your local building or labor department for more information. Inspect the job site for possible hazards such as unstable ground conditions, or overhead electrical lines. Do not attempt to work in bad weather or on wet or icy surfaces. Beware of those working around you. Make sure that everyone knows how to properly use the tools of the trade, both manual and power. Keep your safety equipment clean and in good working order. When not in use, store your equipment in a safe place. 8 PART 4 Safety
  • 8. Keep your safety equipment clean and in working order. When not in use, store your equipment in a safe place. You will want to be able to tie-off on steep roofs without worrying that a frayed rope or strap will break. Make sure you have proper footwear for good traction. Rubber-soled shoes are best. And never work alone. Avoid leaning away from the ladder to work and remember to tie it off to the eaves troughing each time it is moved. Keep the work area free of debris, which is a constant tripping hazard. Consider a trained professional roofer if the roof is steep! Note: All safety guidelines outlined by Government Safety and Fall Protection standards must be followed at all times. Part 5 Deck Preparation and Roof Repair If the old shingles are to be removed, it’s recommended to strip one roof plane at a time and work in these sections through all steps up to and including the roof shingles. Start on the section farthest from the disposal bin so as not to walk on newly laid shingles. The deck must be dry for the job. Be sure that all old nails are removed or hammered down flush to the deck surface. It is essential to make all necessary repairs to the existing roof deck. A warped or uneven surface is difficult to work with during the re-roofing job and creates an unprofessional looking finished project. The deck should be applied in a staggered pattern bridged across roof rafters or roof trusses. Replace rotted, damaged, or warped sheathing or delaminated plywood as it can cause shingles to distort and/or buckle. If the entire deck is to be replaced, check the building codes to determine the required thickness and type of sheathing required in your municipality. Dimensional lumber is subject to expansion and contraction caused by temperature and humidity changes. 9 Deck Preparation and Roof Repair PART 5
  • 9. A deck built with plywood panels generally works well with asphalt shingles. To avoid buckling shingles, you should cover a dimensional deck with an inexpensive sheathing. Our Asphalt Shingle Limited Warranty does not cover buckling. Bad decks can cause shingles to distort and/or buckle. Soil stack and vent flashings can be used again if they’re in good condition, but you should consider replacing them with new ones. Part 6 Drip Edges, Eave Protection and Underlayment Metal or plastic drip edge material nailed every 300 mm (12") may be applied to protect wooden edges from damage and to facilitate water run-off into the eavestrough. Note that IKO’s Pro 4 Roofing System recommends that along with IKO’s shingles, accessory items be utilized to ensure roof performs to its maximum capacity. Eave protection and underlayment are recommended components to the multi-layered system. Apply IKO’s GoldShield Premium Ice & Water Protector, ArmourGard Ice & Water Protector, or StormShield Standard Ice & Water Protector as ice dam protection along the eaves. For ideal protection, Ice & Water Protector should extend up the roof, 610 mm 10 PART 6 Drip Edges, Eave Protection and Underlayment
  • 10. (24") from the inside face of the exterior wall and over the drip edging. However, it is recommended to check your local building codes as it may require the Ice & Water Protector to extend further up the roof. Ice dams form when melted snow runs down the roof to the eaves and freezes again, which forces water back up underneath the shingles. Eave protection carries any water which backs up through the shingle and to the gutter. Ice dams form when melted snow runs down the roof to the eaves and freezes again, which force water back up underneath the shingles. Ice dam. Eave protection carries any water which backs up through the shingles to the gutter. Trapped water. Inside face of stud. Melting snow. To apply StormShield and ArmourGard Ice & Water Protectors: 1. Cut the membrane into 3 m to 4.5 m (10' to 15') lengths. 2. Unroll and align with the lower edge of roof and tack top edge with four equally spaced temporary fasteners. 3. Lift the lower half and remove the lower release film, exposing the adhesive surface. Carefully reposition the membrane down onto the deck and press firmly in place. Avoid wrinkles. Remove temporary fasteners. 4. Fold top half down and remove release film. Carefully reposition the membrane up onto the deck and press firmly in place. To apply GoldShield Ice & Water Protector: 1. Cut the membrane into 3 m to 4.5 m (10' to 15') lengths and reroll. Carefully slit the release paper on a 45° angle. Fold back the release paper exposing the adhesive backing. This corner will be used to hold the material in place as you begin installation. 2. Unroll the next piece of material ensuring that there is an overlap of 90 mm (3 ½") Do not remove release film at this time. Unroll 1 m - 2 m (3' - 6') of membrane. 3. Carefully slit the release paper at the top of the roll. DO NOT CUT THROUGH THE MEMBRANE. 11 Drip Edges, Eave Protection and Underlayment PART 6
  • 11. 4. Peel back approximately 150 mm (6") of the release paper to expose the adhesive. Peel the release paper in the opposite direction that you are applying the membrane. 5. Pull the release paper in the direction that you are applying the membrane, applying pressure to the membrane as you proceed. The membrane will adhere to the deck. 6. Once you have finished laying the membrane, go back to the beginning of the roll, and pull off the release paper at that end. Next, install the underlayment, overlapping the ice and water protector by 100 mm (4"). Please note that a felt or synthetic underlayment, or equivalent, is strongly recommended beneath fiberglass shingles applied to slopes below 6:12. Please refer to the IKO Asphalt Shingle Limited Warranty or the bundle wrappers for further details. Underlayment comes in rolls. It must be unrolled, cut to convenient lengths, and laid out flat until completely relaxed before shingles are applied over it. Water resistant underlayment felts are recommended for a sound roofing system. Use only enough nails or staples to hold each run in place, overlapping the course below by approximately 50 mm (2") (100 mm (4") for RoofGard-SB or Cool-Grey) and ends by 100 mm (4"). Never use a piece less than 2 m (6') in length. Underlayment should overlap hips and ridges by 150 mm (6"), and approximately 100 mm (4") extensions should be left at the chimney and any vertical projection from the roof surface. Apply metal drip edges over the underlayment at the rake edges. For slopes between 2:12 and 4:12, that is between 50 mm (2") of rise to 300 mm (12") of run and 100 mm (4") of rise to 300 mm (12") of run, shingles may be applied. However, in order to validate the Asphalt Shingle Limited Warranty, a full layer of an Ice & Water Protector or two layers of number 15 plain felt, cemented together to 610 mm (24") beyond the interior wall line, and then nailed for the rest of the roof, must be applied to roofs of these slopes. For shingled roof slopes between 2:12 and 3:12, we offer a 12-Year Limited Warranty, regardless of the shingle applied. If this same application procedure is followed for roof slopes between 3:12 and 4:12, a full Limited Material Warranty will be offered. Do not apply Crowne Slate on a slope 4:12 or less. 12 PART 6 Drip Edges, Eave Protection and Underlayment
  • 12. Please note that IKO’s Ice & Water Protectors are vapor retarders. The space under the roof deck must be properly ventilated to avoid moisture condensation. Application of underlayment on low slopes. Drip edge. 483 mm (19")914 mm (36") 483 mm (19") Drip edge. Starter strip. Wall line. Asphalt plastic cement or lap cement. First and succeeding courses are 914 mm (36") wide with 483 mm (19") lap. Deck. 430 mm (17") 483 mm (19") 483 mm (19") 305 mm (12") end lap. Courses cemented to a point at least 610 mm (24") beyond interior wall line. Part 7 Valley Construction There are several different valley application methods which include closed, open and woven. For longer roof performance, IKO strongly recommends open metal valleys. Complete the application of underlayment and valley flashing before the shingles are applied. The recommended flashing material is a 28-gauge galvanized metal or an equivalent corrosion resistant, non staining material (check with local codes). Center a 914 mm (36") width strip of an ice and water protector membrane in the valley. The product is tacked in place temporarily along one edge. Carefully peel away the backing, and put it in place, smoothing out any wrinkles. Start working from the eave, allowing additional pieces to overlap by at least 150 mm (6"). Remove the temporary nails. Center a minimum 610 mm (24") wide, minimum 28 gauge pre-finished/galvanized metal valley liner in the valley, and fasten with only enough nails to hold it in place, nailing at the edges only. Overlap each metal piece by at least 150 mm (6") and use asphalt plastic cement under each section of overlap. Snap two chalk lines the full length of the valley, 150 mm (6") apart at the top 75 mm (3") on each side of the valley and increasing in width 3 mm (⅛") per 300 mm (12") towards the bottom to a maximum of 200 mm (8"). When the shingles are being applied, lay them over the valley flashing, trim the ends to the chalk line and nail the shingles at least 50 mm (2") back from the chalk line. Cut a 50 mm (2") triangle off the top corner to direct water into the valley and embed the valley end of each shingle into a 75 mm (3") band of asphalt plastic cement. 13 Valley Construction PART 7
  • 13. Valley underlayment Underlayment Chalk lines diverge 3 mm per 300 mm (⅛" par 12") Asphalt plastic cement End shingles trimmed to chalk line and set in 75 mm (3") width of cement Valley centerline 300 mm (12") top lap 50 mm (2") clipped off corner at 45° Metal valley flashing Open Valley Application. Part 8 All Shingle Application Whether you are applying Architectural or Traditional 3-Tab Shingles, it is recommended that you read and familiarize yourself with the application instructions provided on the back of each shingle wrapper. One cannot go wrong if those instructions are adhered to during the installation of IKO shingles. Although all types, styles, and sizes have a commonality to their application, each will have an individual installation feature that you must familiarize yourself with. Remember to always drive nails straight so that nail head is flush with, but not cutting into shingle surface. Also, if nail heads are left protruding, they can tear into the shingle that is applied on top of them. Starter Strip Application: For the starter strip, we recommend using IKO’s Leading Edge Plus, a starter course that has already been cut to size. Each 1 m (39 ⅜") x 337 mm (13 ¼") IKO Leading Edge Plus strip is perforated lengthwise for separation into two (2) shingles. Note that IKO’s Pro 4 Roofing System recommends that along with IKO’s shingles, accessory items be utilized to ensure roof performs to its maximum capacity. Starter strips are recommended component to the multi-layered system. Take one IKO Leading Edge Plus strip and fold flat at the perforation to separate. Take one of the separated shingles and remove approximately 508 mm (20"). Install this shingle on the lower left corner of the roof deck, granule side up, with the factory installed sealant adjacent to the eaves. 14 PART 8 All Shingle Application
  • 14. The shingle should overhang the rake edge and eaves by 6 mm - 10 mm (¼" – ⅜"). Fasten the shingle to the roof deck with nails located 75 mm to 100 mm (3" to 4") from the eave edge and 25 mm (1") in from each end. Take the leftover 508 mm (20") piece shingle. Rotate the piece and align it vertically up the rake edge with the factory installed sealant adjacent to the outer edge of the roof. The shingle should overhang the rake edge by 6 mm - 10 mm (¼" – ⅜"). Fasten the shingle to the roof deck with fasteners located 75 mm to 100 mm (3" to 4") from the rake edge and 25 mm (1") in from each end. Repeat these steps to the right lower corner of the roof deck. Apply full-length IKO Leading Edge Plus shingles to the remaining eave edge of the roof deck. Install the shingles granule side up with the factory applied sealant adjacent to the eaves. The shingles should overhang the rake edge and eaves by 6 mm - 10 mm (¼" – ⅜"). Fasten the shingles to the roof deck with nails located 75 mm to 100 mm (3" to 4") from the eave edge, 4 nails per shingle. Make certain the first course of field shingle lies flush with the edges of the fastened IKO Leading Edge Plus. In this way, the sealant on the IKO Leading Edge Plus shingles will adhere to the first-course field shingles and help keep them from lifting in high winds. As a general rule, all shingles must be applied properly. We assume no responsibility for leaks or defects resulting from poor application or failure to properly prepare the surface to be roofed over, or failure to provide proper ventilation in accordance with minimum property standards requirements. Review all applicable building codes, minimum property standards and requirements prior to applying these shingles using the application instructions found on the bundle wrapper. Please use caution when stacking bundles on sloped roofs. Part 8A Armourshake Application Armour Starter Application: After applying the Leading Edge Plus starter strip shingle, install the Armour Starter shingle starting on the lower left corner of the roof deck, granule side up. Apply full-length IKO Armour Starter shingles to the eave edge of the roof deck. Make certain the Armour Starter shingles lie flush with the edges of the fastened IKO Leading Edge Plus. Armourshake Application: First Course: Start with a full shingle. Trim the rake end of the shingle slightly so it is flush with the rake. Apply the shingle flush with starter course at rake and eaves. Use 5 nails per shingle in the nail line approximately 25 mm (1") from each end and equally spaced along the shingle’s full length. Drive nails straight so that the nail head is flush with, but not cutting into, the shingle surface. 15 Armourshake Application PART 8A
  • 15. Second Course: Start with a shingle from which 143 mm (5 ⅝") has been cut at the rake end. Align the end of the shingle with the alignment notch in the top edge of the first course shingle. Continue with full shingles along the second course. Third Course: Start with a shingle from which 286 mm (11 ¼") has been cut at the rake end. Use the appropriate alignment notch in the top edge of the second course shingle. Continue with full shingles along the third course. Fourth Course: Start with a shingle from which 429 mm (16 ⅞") has been cut at the rake end. Use the appropriate alignment notch in the top edge of the third course shingle. Continue with full shingles along the fourth course. Fifth Course: Start with a shingle from which 572 mm (22 ½") has been cut at the rake end. Use the appropriate alignment notch in the top edge of the fourth course shingle. Continue with full shingles along the fifth course. Sixth Course: Start with a shingle from which 714 mm (28 ⅛") has been cut at the rake end. Use the appropriate alignment notch in the top edge of the fifth course shingle. Continue with full shingles along the sixth course. Successive Courses: Repeat this pattern: Full shingle cut flush, 143 mm (5 ⅝") removed, 286 mm (11 ¼") removed, 429 mm (16 ⅞") removed, 572 mm (22 ½") removed, 714 mm (28 ⅛") removed, full shingle cut flush, 143 mm (5 ⅝") removed, 286 mm (11 ¼") removed, 429 mm (16 ⅞") removed, 571 mm (22 ½") removed, 714 mm (28 ⅛") removed etc. For added wind protection, use 6 nails per shingle and seal down each shingle with (3) 25 mm (1") diameter spots of asphalt plastic cement placed under each tab. ArmourShake Shingle Application. Underlayment Eave protection Metal Drip Edge Metal Drip Edge 100mm(4") 50 mm (2") Part 8B Crowne Slate Application  Due to shingle design, it is recommended to begin application at the left side of the roof and work across the roof to the right. This is a fully laminated two-layer shingle. Shingles should be laid flat (not bent) prior to installation to avoid distortions and buckles. First Course: Starting from the left rake edge, trim 229 mm (9") (one full tab) from the end of the shingle so that the tab is flush with the rake edge. Apply the shingle flush with 16 PART 8B Crowne Slate Application
  • 16. starter course at left rake edge and eaves. Use 5 nails per shingle placed in the nail line approximately 25 mm (1") in from each end and equally spaced along the shingle’s full length. Drive nails straight so that the nail head is flush with, but not cutting into, shingle surface. Continue across the roof with full shingles, overlapping each shingle as you proceed. Second Course: Start with a shingle from which one and one half tabs has been cut at the rake end. Apply with lower edge of the shingle 250 mm (10") above that of the first course. There are small shingle alignment slits at the sides and in the top edge of the shingle to aid installation, but chalk lines should always be used to ensure proper offset. Third and Succeeding Courses: Start the third course with a shingle from which two full tabs have been cut off. Cut off an additional half a tab to start each succeeding course, aligning the lower edge of the shingle 250 mm (10") above that of the preceding course. At the fifth course, repeat the sequence of the first four courses. For maximum wind protection, cement shingles at the rake edges. For added wind protection, use 8 nails per shingle and seal down each shingle with (5) 25 mm (1") diameter spots of asphalt plastic cement spaced as shown on the shingle bundle wrapper. Crowne Slate Shingle Application. Part 8C Cambridge/Grandeur Application Note that these brands, Cambridge and Grandeur, are the same size so we will discuss installation collectively. First Course: Start with a complete shingle applied flush with starter course at rake and eave. Use 4 nails per shingle placed in the nail line 187 mm (7 ⅜") below the top edge, approximately 25 mm (1") and 330 mm (13") in from each end. Drive nails straight so that nail head is flush with, but not cutting into shingle surface. Continue across roof with full shingles. Second, Third and Fourth Courses: Trim off 250 mm, 508 mm, and 762 mm (10", 20", and 30") respectively, from the left end of the starting shingle and apply to overhang rake edge by 6 mm to 10 mm (¼" to ⅜"). Continue each course across the roof with full shingles butting ends loosely. Align the bottom edge of the shingles with the tops of the saw teeth of the shingles in the underlying course. Fifth and Succeeding Courses: Repeat the sequence of the first four courses up the roof. For maximum wind protection, cement shingles at rake edges. 17 Cambridge/Grandeur Application PART 8C
  • 17.  For added wind protection, use 6 nails per shingle and seal down each shingle with (3) 25 mm (1") diameter spots of asphalt plastic cement spaced evenly along the shingle. 100 mm (4") Eave protection Underlayment 760 mm (30") 508 mm (20") 250 mm (10") 50 mm (2") Metal drip edge 2nd, 3rd and 4th courses Starter stripFirst course Laminated Shingle Application. Part 8D Royal Estate Application First Course: Start with a complete shingle applied flush with starter course at rake and eave. Use 4 nails per shingle placed in the nail line 181 mm (7 ⅛") below the top edge, approx. 25 mm and 330 mm (1" and 13") in from each end. Drive nails straight so that nail head is flush with, but not cutting into shingle surface. Second, Third And Fourth Courses: Trim off 250 mm, 508 mm, and 762 mm (10", 20", and 30") respectively, from the left end of the starting shingle and apply to overhang rake edge by 6 mm to 10 mm (¼" to ⅜"). Continue each course across the roof with full shingles butting ends loosely. Align the bottom edge of the shingles with the tops of the cutouts of the shingles in the underlying course. Fifth And Succeeding Courses: Repeat the sequence of the first four courses up the roof. For maximum wind protection, cement shingles at rake edges. For added wind protection, use 6 nails per shingle and seal down each shingle with (3) 25 mm (1") diameter spots of asphalt plastic cement spaced evenly along the shingle. Eave protection Underlayment Metal drip edge 4th course 3rd course 2nd course Starter stripFirst course Royal Estate Shingle Application. 100 mm (4") 50 mm (2") 760 mm (30") 508 mm (20") 250 mm (10") 18 PART 8D Royal Estate Application
  • 18. Part 8E Marathon Application There are several approved offset methods for applying 3-Tab shingles. Half Tab Method There is the half tab method whereby each course after the first, has an additional half of a tab removed on the rake side, until it’s time to start over with a full shingle to complete the succeeding courses. It is important to note that the proper exposure for the 3-Tab shingle starts at the top of the cut-out and works down to the most exposed edge of the shingle. Exposing more or less than what is recommended could result in wind damage or leaks that are not protected by the Limited Warranty. This method can be employed when it is necessary for the cut-outs of every other course to be aligned vertically up the roof. When nailing 3-Tab shingles, use 4 nails per shingle placed 156 mm (6 ⅛") above the butt edge, 25 mm and 330 mm (1" and 13") in from each end and 13 mm (½") above each cutout. Drive nails straight so that nail head is flush with, but not cutting into shingle surface. 3-Tab Shingle Application. Metal drip edge Drip edge Starter full shingle minus 100 mm (4") with tabs cut-off Start second course with full strip minus ½ tab Start first course with full strip Sealing strip Eaves flashing strip Wood deck Start third course with full strip minus first tab Random Method A superior method of applying 3-Tab shingles (instead of taking a half tab, or approximately 168 mm (6 ⅝") additional off of the shingle for each succeeding course after the first), allows the installer to remove approximately 143 mm (5 ⅝") additional from each succeeding course. Therefore, the third course will have 286 mm (11 ¼") removed from the rake side of the shingle, the fourth course will have 429 mm (16 ⅞") removed, the fifth course will have 572 mm (22 ½") removed, the sixth course will have 714 mm (28 ⅛") removed, and the seventh course first shingle will be reduced by 857 mm (33 ¾"). Of course all of this measuring can be done with the aid of the gauge on your roofing hatchet or power nailer fixed at the shingle exposure of 143 mm (5 ⅝"). 19 Marathon Application PART 8E
  • 19. This method of application has a significant advantage over the half tab method. This method will mask any small variations in the shingle alignment that are due to variations in deck squareness, normal production or shingle application processes. Please remind yourself that under no circumstance do you want the cut-outs of the shingles to be closer than 100 mm (4") when aligned with the next course both above and below. As well, you do not want the joints of the starter strips to be any closer than 100 mm (4") to the joints or cut-outs of the shingles in the first course. The random spacing method of applying 3-Tab shingles can be achieved by removing differing amounts from the rake tab. Generally, the following principles should be followed. • The width of any tab should be no less than ¼ of the overall dimension of that tab. • The cut-outs should not be located any less than 100 mm (4") laterally from the cut-outs in both the course above and the course below. • The width of the tabs at the rake must not repeat close enough to cause the eye to be able to follow a cut-out alignment. As an example, the first course can be a full shingle tab wide. The second course can start with ½ of the rake side tab being removed. The third course can start with ¼ of the rake side tab removed. The fourth course can start with ¾ of the rake side tab removed. The fifth course can be started with another ½ tab to the rake side. For added wind protection, use 6 nails per shingle and seal down each shingle with (3) 25 mm (1") diameter spots of asphalt plastic cement spaced evenly along the shingle. Part 9 Re-Roofing If you feel that your roof deck is in good condition and needs no repair, you can re-roof over the existing layer of shingles. For best results, we recommend a technique called “nesting”. However, it is advised that you check your local building codes to ensure re-roofing over existing shingles is allowed for your area. Nesting, which minimizes an uneven appearance that can be caused by the underlying material, may also be used when applying metric-sized shingles over an existing roof of metric shingles. 20 PART 9 Re-Roofing
  • 20. If the old shingles have only a 125 mm (5") exposure, you will require 12.5% or ⅛ more 3-tabs than you would if you stripped off to the deck. Begin with a “starter” strip. Remove the tabs plus enough from the top of the starter strip so that the remaining portion is equal in width to the exposure of the old shingles. Apply the starter strip so that it is even with the existing roof at the eaves, locating the factory applied adhesive along the eaves edge. Remove 100 mm (4") from the end of the first starter strip shingle to ensure that joints between adjacent starter strip shingles will be covered when the first course is applied. For the first course, you need to trim enough material from the bottom of the shingles to allow them to fit between the bottom of the tabs of the old third course and the eave edge of the new starter strip. Start with a full length shingle. Use 4 nails per shingle placed per the respective shingle’s application instructions. In this case, for Cambridge, that would be in the nailing line. You will require slightly longer nails, in order to penetrate through the old shingles and the roof deck. For the second and all succeeding courses, offset the shingles as you would for installation on a new deck. Place the top edge of the new shingle against the bottom edge of the tabs of the old shingle in the course above. Although the exposure of the first course is reduced when using this method, this will not be noticeable when viewed from the ground. For valleys, you must first build up the exposed valley area with Roof-Fast to a level flush with the old shingles. Center a minimum 610 mm (24") wide, minimum 28 gauge pre-finished/galvanized metal valley liner in the valley, and fasten with only enough nails to hold it in place, nailing at the edges only. Overlap each metal piece by at least 150 mm (6") and use asphalt plastic cement under each section of overlap. Snap two chalk lines the full length of the valley, 150 mm (6") apart at the top and increasing in width 3 mm (⅛") per 300 mm (12") towards the bottom to a maximum of 200 mm (8"). When the shingles are being applied, lay them over the valley flashing, trim the ends to the chalk line, and cut a 50 mm (2") triangle off the top corner to direct water into the valley. Embed the valley end of each shingle into a 75 mm (3") band of asphalt plastic cement, and nail the shingles 50 mm (2") back from the chalk line. 21 Re-Roofing PART 9
  • 21. Special attention is required when working with existing flashings. If the existing flashing is in good condition, continue applying the new shingles over the existing shingles. Trim the new shingles to within 6 mm (¼") of the existing step flashing. Embed the last 75 mm (3") of these shingles in asphalt plastic cement. If the flashings need to be replaced, remove the counter flashing, cut away the old shingles covering the step flashings, and remove the flashing. Build up the areas of the exposed roof deck to a level even with the old shingles before applying new step flashings. When applying the new shingles, each shingle course will be covered by a step flashing. Flashings need to be at least 125 mm (5") high, and 125 mm (5") wide. Each flashing should overlap the one below by at least 75 mm (3"), but not be visible below the shingle top lap. Imbed each step flashing in a 75 mm (3") wide application of asphalt plastic cement, and nail in place. The end of each shingle overlapping a step flashing is also well embedded in plastic cement. Remember to reinstall counter-flashing over the step flashings. Existing vents and flashings around soil stacks may be used again, but it’s recommended that new flashings and vents be installed. Using the hooked blade knife, cut through the old shingles around the perimeter of the flashing apron and remove them. Fill in this space with a double layer of shingles. Apply courses of new shingles up to the hole in the roof deck. Cut away the shingles to reveal the hole. Plastic cement is applied at the edges and then the vent is nailed firmly in place. Continue shingling, cutting to fit around the vent. The cut shingles should be laid in a bed of asphalt plastic cement. Pipe flashings are installed in a similar fashion and asphalt plastic cement is used to seal the pipe. Nails used to secure flashings to the roof should be used sparingly and not be driven close to the pipe. A dab of plastic cement over the exposed nails is recommended to avoid leakage. Part 10 Low Slope - Roof-Fast Application Some roof areas may not be suitable for shingles especially due to low slope (less than 2:12 down to 1:12). In these areas the recommended product is Roof-Fast, a self-adhered membrane (SAM) system, ideal for low-slope roofing that combines the polymer chemistry of commercial grade modified bitumen membranes with the self-adhesive characteristics of an ice and water protector and the beauty of a granule surface. 22 PART 10 Low Slope - Roof-Fast Application
  • 22. The Roof-Fast system is comprised of Roof-Fast Cap which is a fiberglass reinforced self- adhesive cap sheet in a variety of attractive mineral surface colors, with a release film on the back side. Roof-Fast Base MA is a fiberglass reinforced nailable base with special film surface designed for use with self-adhered cap sheet. Roof-Fast 95, a self-adhering base sheet, is an alternative base sheet that may be used as part of the system. To begin applying the Roof-Fast system using the Roof-Fast Base MA, start at the lowest edge of the roof. Prepare a starter strip by cutting the base sheet lengthwise in half and lay flat on the clean, dry deck. Leave a minimum 50 mm (2") of base sheet overhanging roof edge to cover any exposed joints in the wood facia where water could penetrate. Fasten the Roof‑Fast Base MA at 457 mm (18") on center in a row down the approximate center of the starter sheet leaving upper edge free of fasteners for later steps in installation. The preferred nail of choice for this application is a 25 mm (1") diameter steel cap nail. Lay out a full width base sheet overlapping the starter sheet by a minimum of 75 mm (3"). Fasten through the overlap with 25 mm (1") disk nails 229 mm (9") on center working from the center of the sheet outwards. Ensure the sheet lays flat and wrinkle free at all times. Fasten the center of the sheet with two rows of nails 457 mm (18") apart in a staggered formation starting from the center and working outwards. Repeat this step until the entire surface has been covered. Prior to beginning the drip edge installation, prime surface of drip edge/metal flashing with primer for self adhering membrane and allow to dry. Turn down 50 mm (2") overlap from starter strip along the drip edge area and secure with roofing nails at 229 mm (9") on center to fascia. Cut a strip of Roof-Fast Cap 300 mm (12") wide and lay across roof edge granular side down. Using the drip edge/metal flashing as a guide, score the release film the width of the drip edge with the back of a utility knife. Remove scored release film closest to roof edge and place primed drip edge/metal flashing over scored area of Roof-Fast. Fasten with roofing nails at 229 mm (9") on center staggered approximately 25 mm (1") in from inside metal edge. To complete base sheet installation, secure base sheet at remaining perimeters with 25 mm (1") steel cap nails 229 mm (9") on center. To apply the Cap Sheet, start at the lowest point of the roof and roll out full width Roof‑Fast Cap Sheet. Cut to desired length, dry fit to roof edge in final position and allow to relax. Make sure the 90 mm (3 ½") sidelap on the Roof-Fast Cap is opposite, (furthest away), from drip edge/metal flashing. Using the butterfly technique, while kneeling on the upper half of positioned cap sheet fold back ½ of the width towards you to expose release film. Remove remaining release film from 300 mm (12") inverted cap sheet strip. Remove exposed release 23 Low Slope - Roof-Fast Application PART 10
  • 23. film from Roof-Fast cap, (½ width), and slowly “walk” cap sheet into place over base sheet. Fold down the upper unadhered cap sheet, remove release film and gently place into final position. Use a roller to ensure consistent contact of Roof-Fast Cap to the Base Sheet. In hot weather it may be best to limit the length of individual pieces of Roof-Fast to a maximum of 4 m (12') for ease of handling. Roll out second cap sheet, cut to size, dry fit into final position and allow to relax. Ensure second sheet overlaps the 90 mm (3 ½") side lap of the first sheet. Repeat the procedure for installation of first sheet remembering to remove release film covering the side lap on the first sheet. Continue up the roof repeating this procedure until all surface is covered. To apply an end lap to the Roof-Fast Cap Sheet, cut a section of cap sheet that overlaps the adhered section by 150 mm (6"). Apply a 150 mm (6") bead of mastic sealant with a trowel on the overlap section. Peel off release film and press firmly. Remove remaining release film on back of cap sheet and firmly press onto base sheet. Use a roller to ensure consistent contact of Roof-Fast Cap to the Base Sheet. Roof-Fast (SAM) Application Field of Roof. The IKO End Lap is granule- free and protected with a peel off foil release strip. Some cap sheets may not have an End Lap feature; in these cases use cemented end lap procedure above. Release poly - To be removed prior to seaming. The IKO 45° angle cut provides additional adhesion at the junction between successive sheets. This feature is on Roof‑Fast membranes only. Down slope roll 150 mm (6") 90 mm (3 ½") Roof Slope For the alternate base application, using the Roof-Fast 95 Base, apply a coat of self-adhering primer to the full deck and allow to dry. Cut sheet to size and using the butterfly technique, while kneeling on the upper half of positioned base cap sheet, fold back half of the width towards you, remove release film and slowly “walk” base sheet into place. Fold down the upper unadhered cap sheet, remove release film and gently place into position. As an optional application, where roof area and roof slope allow, instead of starting with a half-width of Roof-Fast Base MA, use a full-width of IKO’s GoldShield Premium Ice & Water membrane. In this installation, at eaves/rakes, the drip edge is installed over the GoldShield and below the fastened base sheet layer. The drip edge should be set in continuous bands of asphalt cement to ensure water-tightness with the membrane layers. 24 PART 10 Low Slope - Roof-Fast Application
  • 24. Part 11 Ventilation Proper ventilation is necessary to mitigate attic heat build-up, and to avoid condensation problems that may cause dampness to rot the roof deck and distort the roofing materials. The air in your home is laden with moisture from cooking, laundry, bathing, the respiration of plants and animals and the evaporation from plumbing fixtures. Water vapor is a serious concern during the winter months when the home is generally closed up tight. At that time, the water vapor generated in the home typically migrates up into the attic since the ceiling vapor barrier is rarely 100% perfect. Without proper ventilation, this excess moisture will remain in the attic, condense, and cause damage. As warm moist air meets the colder air along the inside of the roof deck, condensation will form. This condensation may eventually lead to rotting wood in the attic and may also drip onto the insulation and reduce its effectiveness. Ice damming occurs as the warm moist air raises the temperature of the snow on the roof and melts it. The water then runs down the roof where it re-freezes as it reaches the colder area at the eaves. Roof vents come in different shapes and sizes. Never mix different type of vents on the same roof. If your attic is under-vented, your roof rafters or trusses, roof deck and shingles are invaded by the moisture. This will reduce the life of the asphalt shingles. To minimize these problems, it is important to have proper ventilation. Remember, good venting involves both intake and exhaust. The intake must be at the eaves and the exhaust must be at or near the ridge. The venting must be balanced with approximately 50% at the intake or eaves and 50% at the ridge. With proper ventilation, air will circulate freely under the roof deck and carry away water vapor before it can condense. One of the best methods is a combination of continuous eaves and ridge vents that together provide uniform natural draft ventilation from the bottom to the top of the attic space. Louvre and vent openings should not be covered during the winter. Eaves or soffit vents should not be blocked by insulation. 25 Ventilation PART 11
  • 25. There are several venting products on the market today that work well at the ridge of the roof. Ask your local distributor for more information. When determining the need for additional vents, the minimum specification underlined in building codes for net free ventilation area, that is, the area permitting unrestricted airflow, of 0.1 m2 for 14 m2 (1 ft2 for 150 ft2) of attic floor space is recommended. When vents are located at eaves or soffits and near the roof’s peak or along the ridge for maximum net airflow, the net free vent area may be reduced to a minimum 0.1 m2 for 28 m2 (1 ft2 for 300 ft2) for a balanced system, ventilation should be equal at the undereave and at or near the ridgeline. One square foot of net free area for every one hundred and fifty square feet of insulated ceiling area is required for low sloped roofs. The net free area is usually stamped right on the vent by the manufacturer. Improper ventilation. summer winter Proper ventilation. under-eave or soffit ventilation For new roof vents, a hole should be cut the same size as the vent hole. Ideally you should center a 1 m by 1 m (3' by 3') section of one of our IKO’s Ice & Water Protectors over the new vent hole. Cut away any ice and water protector now covering up the hole. Shingle up to the bottom of the vent opening, and remove any shingle material that may be covering the hole. Apply plastic cement around the edges and nail the vent securely in place. Continue shingling, cutting to fit around the vent. Each cut shingle should be laid in a bead of cement. A dab of asphalt plastic cement over the exposed nails is recommended to avoid leakage. Several manufacturers now supply specialized ridge vents. To use these vents, install shingle courses up the roof to the ridge so that the ridge caps will cover the sealing strip on both faces of the roof at the ridge. Cut away the roof decking to reveal 25 mm (1") of space on both sides of the ridge joist. At both ends of the ridge, apply ridge cap shingles as already outlined, to cover at least 300 mm (12") of the ridge. 26 PART 11 Ventilation
  • 26. For rigid ridge vents, center the ridge vent over the ridge, and overlap the installed ridge cap shingles so that the nails and sealing strip are covered. Nail to the deck using the nailing marks supplied by the vent manufacturer. For rapid ridge vents, measure length of ridge and cut fabric to size. Center vent over slot on one end with nail lines upwards and fasten with two nails. Roll out along entire ridge, pull out slack, and fasten with two nails at opposite end. Beginning from the end of the ridge opposite the direction of the prevailing winds, apply ridge cap shingles over the ridge vent, exposing each piece in the same manner as before. Nail the caps to the ridge vent following the nailing guide on the vent, as provided by the vent manufacturer. Part 12 Flashings Roof planes that butt against vertical walls at the end of the shingle course are protected by metal step flashing at least 125 mm high and 125 mm wide (5" high and 5" wide). When applying the new shingles, each shingle course will be covered by a step flashing. There are two simple rules to follow: • Each flashing should overlap the one below by at least 75 mm (3"), but not be visible below the shingle top lap • Imbed each step flashing in a 75 mm (3") wide application of asphaltic plastic cement, and nail in place. Then the end of each shingle overlapping a step flashing must also be well embedded in plastic cement. Flashing installation. 27 Flashings PART 12
  • 27. The metal step flashing shingles are rectangular in shape and style, approximately 250 mm (10") long and at least 50 mm (2") wider than the face of the shingle being used. For instance, when using metal flashing shingles with a typical 143 mm (5 ⅝") exposure, the size of the flashing will be 250 mm x 200 mm (10" x 8"). The 250 mm (10") length is bent in half so that 125 mm (5") will reach up the wall surface and the other 125 mm (5") will extend onto the roof deck. Note: Other step flashing sizes are also acceptable. To install the flashing shingle on the first course, place it over the end of the starter strip. Place it so the tab of the end shingle covers it completely. Secure the horizontal flange to the roof deck using two nails. Do not fasten the flashing shingle to the vertical wall. This will allow the flashing shingle to move with any expansion and contraction that may occur with the roof deck. Place the second step flashing shingle over the end shingle in the first course by positioning it 143 mm (5 ⅝") above the bottom edge of the exposed asphalt shingle. Make sure that the tab of the shingle in the second course will cover it completely. Secure the horizontal flange to the roof. The second and succeeding courses will follow with the end shingles flashed as in preceding courses. Chimney flashings are secured to the roof over top of the shingles and counter or cap flashings are secured to the chimney, providing a waterproof seal. Flashing at front and side of chimney Application of corner flashing at rear of chimney Application of flashing over cricket Application of flashing over ridge of cricket 28 PART 12 Flashings
  • 28. Application of counter flashing at side and rear of chimney Application of counter flashing For pipe flashings around soil stacks, shingle up to the bottom of the stack. Apply plastic cement around the edges, and then slide the new flashing over the soil pipe and into place. Nails used to secure flashings to the roof should be used sparingly, not be drive close to the pipe, and where recommended by the manufacturer. Continue shingling, cutting to fit around the stack. Each cut shingle should be laid in a bead of cement. A dab of plastic cement over the exposed nails is recommended to avoid leakage. Application of shingle over vent pipe. Application of flange. 29 Flashings PART 12
  • 29. Application of shingles around flashing. Part 13 Hips and Ridges Apply shingles up to a hip or ridge from both sides of the roof before finishing the intersection. Note that IKO’s Pro 4 Roofing System recommends that along with IKO’s shingles, accessory items be utilized to ensure roof performs to its maximum capacity. Hip and Ridge cap shingles are a recommended component to the multi-layered system. To apply the ridge shingles, bend each shingle along the centerline so that it will extend an equal distance on each side of the hip or ridge. 130 mm (5 ⅛") 146 mm (5 ¾") 25 mm (1") Hip & Ridge 12 Ridge Cap Shingles are specially made ridge cap shingles that are lightweight and perforated to give you 3 pieces, each 300 mm (12") wide. The shingles are easy to separate, even at the site of application! Hip & Ridge 12 are fiberglass asphalt shingles equipped with an SBS modified adhesive sealant for maximum wind protection. Prior to application in cold weather, storing the shingles in a heated area will allow for easier bending. 30 PART 13 Hips and Ridges
  • 30. Ridge cap shingles may be applied in a traditional “single” dimensional thickness and appearance. To obtain a three-dimensional effect, (which is recommended, but not required), apply hip and ridge shingles double thickness by stacking 2 pieces on top of one another, the lower piece extending about 19 mm (¾") further than the top piece. • Separate Hip & Ridge 12 shingles into thirds, using the perforation marks as a guide. • These shingles are designed for a 130 mm (5 ⅛") exposure. (For a neater appearance, the top of each side of each piece can be trimmed on a 25 mm (1") taper.) • Bend each piece over the hip or ridge, and nail 130 mm (5 ⅛") above the butt edge, 25 mm (1") in from each edge, exposing each piece 130 mm (5 ⅛"). • Apply hip pieces starting at the lower end of the hip, working up toward the ridge. On hip roofs, apply ridge pieces starting at each end, meeting in the middle. On gable roofs, apply ridge pieces starting at the end opposite to the prevailing wind direction and continue to the other end. The final shingle should be set in cement, and the exposed nail heads of the final shingle should be covered with cement. Ultra HP™ Hip & Ridge shingles are specially constructed ridge cap shingles designed to provide a high-quality, high-profile alternative to using cut-up shingles to protect this important area. Apply the shingles with an 210 mm (8 ¼") exposure (even with notch), beginning at the bottom of the hip, or from the end of the ridge opposite the direction of the prevailing winds. Form the shingle to the roof deck prior to nailing. For steeper roofs, it may be necessary to push down slightly on the sides of the shingle. Use two nails, one on each side of the shingle, located 19 mm (¾") back from the shingle notch. In high wind areas, seal down each IKO UltraHP™ shingle with two 25 mm (1") spots of asphalt plastic cement. For added roof definition, IKO UltraHP™ may also be installed at gable and rake edges. Several manufacturers now supply specialized ridge vents. To use these vents, install shingle courses up the roof to the ridge so that the ridge caps will cover the sealing strip on both faces of the roof at the ridge. Cut away the roof decking to reveal the appropriate space based on vent manufacturer’s specifications. At both ends of the ridge, apply ridge caps as already outlined, to cover at least 300 mm (12") of the ridge. Center the ridge vent over the ridge, and overlap the installed ridge caps so that the nails and sealing strip are covered. Nail to the deck using the nailing marks supplied by the vent manufacturer. Nails should be a minimum of 50 mm (2") to ensure penetration through vent, shingle and into roof deck. 31 Hips and Ridges PART 13
  • 31. Beginning from the end of the ridge opposite the direction of the prevailing winds, apply ridge caps over the ridge vent, exposing each piece in the same manner as before. Nail the caps to the ridge vent following the nailing guide on the vent, as provided by the vent manufacturer. Part 14 Inspection and Clean Up Before leaving the job, it is necessary to clean up all debris from the roof, valleys and gutters. Remove the protective tarps you laid down earlier to easily get rid of old shingles, wrappers, granules and nails. It’s recommended you flush out eavestroughs to ensure unobstructed water flow, and to give your job a professional finish. The use of a magnetic sweeper is recommended to rid the yard and driveway of nails and metallic debris. Part 15 Roof Care and Maintenance Congratulations! We knew you could do it. While your roof will provide years of protection, there are some aspects of continuing roof care that you should be aware of to ensure maximum roof performance. Keep gutters and roof surfaces clear of all debris. This will allow water to flow freely off the roof. Keep trees trimmed to prevent damage from branches scuffing the roof surface. Make semi-annual inspections of the roof to evaluate its general condition in terms of potential leakage problems. The best time for this in the spring and fall after the severe weather conditions have passed. Inspect the underside of the roof deck from the attic to detect leaks. Flashings are the most vulnerable points. Water stains will be evident if there has been some leakage or severe condensation. Part 16 Products IKO manufactures a full line of asphalt roofing shingles. These shingles feature fiberglass mats, and are available in several popular styles in a variety of colors. Now that you’ve seen how easy it is to re-roof your home, it’s time to select the shingle that will exactly meet your requirements. 32 PART 14 Inspection and Clean Up
  • 32. We make one of the finest 3-Tab shingles on the market: Time-tested and true, IKO Traditional 3-Tab shingles are one of our most popular shingle designs. The traditional 3-Tab design shingle gets its name from the three tabs incorporated into its profile. IKO Traditional 3-Tab shingles, the Marathon Series, are available in a wide variety of colors and available with Limited Warranty lengths of 30, 25 or 20 years and Limited Wind Warranty coverage up to 60 miles per hour or 97 kilometers per hour. Traditional 3-Tab shingle For dimensional thickness and strength, choose IKO laminated architectural shingles IKO Crowne Slate, with its hybrid, two-piece construction is coated with our own IKO-SBS modified asphalt which makes these shingles extremely durable and impact-resistant, with a UL2218 Class 4 Rating. Their dimensional thickness and profile evokes the beautiful contours and natural appearance of slate tiles. Plus, we’ve embedded ceramic- coated copper granules into the top layer, making the roof algae resistant. This premium fiberglass-based shingle comes with a Limited Lifetime Warranty and features a Limited Algae-Resistance Warranty. Armourshake Laminated Designer shingles provide a dimensional thickness that enhances the rough-hewn, random-cut appearance, texture and profile of classic wood shakes and feature an algae resistant system with a Limited Algae-Resistance Warranty. Featuring a UL2218 Class 4 Rating, this premium fiberglass-based shingle comes with a Limited Lifetime Warranty. Although Royal Estate can be installed as simply and easily as a standard laminated shingle, it offers a remarkable slate-like appearance. This shingle is distinguished by a uniquely synchronized manufacturing process which results in distinctly colored tabs. Along with a Limited Lifetime Warranty, this shingle is offered in rich hues of Harvest Slate, Mountain Slate, Shadow Slate and Taupe Slate. 33 Products PART 16
  • 33. Grandeur stands up to the competition just as effectively as it does the weather. Most roofing shingles will provide quality protection against the simpler elements of nature, such as wind, rain, snow and average temperatures. IKO’s Grandeur shingles, with a Limited Lifetime Warranty, are designed to withstand Mother Nature’s forces with its superior UL2218 Class 4 impact resistance rating. Engineered to last and built to perform, providing superior resistance against thermal cycling and high winds. Grandeur shingles offer the added protection of algae resistant granules to keep the roof looking beautiful, even in regions of heavy rainfall and high humidity. The IKO Cambridge shingles are laminated to provide a remarkable dimensional thickness, not only for strength, durability and weather resistance, but also to create an extraordinarily beautiful look to your home. These premium fiberglass shingles are offered with a Limited Lifetime Warranty in a wide array of unique and striking colors. IKO Cambridge shingles are also available with an algae resistant system with a Limited Algae-Resistance Warranty. All IKO shingles are quality manufactured to IKO’s rigid specifications, using only the highest quality raw materials. IKO also offers a selection of roofing accessories, which include our Ice Water Protection; GoldShield, ArmourGard and StormShield, Hip Ridge products, Roof-Fast, various felts and synthetic underlayment and Leading Edge Plus Starter strips. To aid in your shingle and color selection, you can also use the IKO RoofViewerTM interactive shingle selector tool, available on-line and on CD. IKO ROOFViewer™ is an interactive tool which allows the customer to easily select a shingle style and color to co-ordinate with brick or siding and trim. It’s an easy way of finding out how your house will look with a particular shingle. To ensure complete satisfaction, please make your final color selection from several full size shingles and view a sample of the product installed on a home. 34 PART 16 Products
  • 34. Please note product availability varies by plant. For additional information on IKO’s full line of superior roofing products, talk to your IKO dealer, visit the website at www.iko.com, or contact United States 1-888-IKO-Roof, Eastern Canada 1-888-766-2468 or Western Canada 1-800-661-1034. Thank you for considering IKO Roofing Products. 35 Products PART 16
  • 35. Glossary Algae Discoloration: A type of black roof discoloration caused by algae. Sometimes referred to as fungus growth. Asphalt: A bituminous waterproofing agent applied to roofing materials during manufacture. Asphalt Plastic Cement: An asphalt-based cement used to bond roofing materials. Also known as flashing cement or mastic; typically conforms to ASTM D 4586 (Asbestos Free) or CGSB 37-GP-5MA. Backsurfacing: Fine mineral matter applied to the back side of shingles to keep them from sticking together. IKO uses backsurfacing materials such as talc, dolomite and mineral fines. Blisters: Bubbles that may appear on the surface of asphalt roofing after installation. Bridging: A method of re-roofing with larger-sized shingles. Bundle: A package of shingles. Butt Edge: The lower edge of the shingle tabs. Caulk: To fill a joint with mastic or asphalt cement to prevent leaks. Chalk Line: A line made on the roof by snapping a taut string or cord dusted with chalk. Used for alignment purposes. Closed Cut Valley: A method of valley treatment in which shingles from one side of the valley extend across the valley while shingles from the other side are trimmed 50 mm (2) from the valley centerline. The valley flashing is not exposed. Counter Flashing: That portion of the flashing attached to a vertical surface to prevent water from migrating behind the base flashing. Course: A row of shingles or roll roofing running the length of the roof. Coverage: Amount of weather protection provided by the roofing material. Depends on the number of layers of material between the exposed surface of the roofing and the deck; i.e., single coverage, double coverage, etc. Cricket: A peaked saddle construction at the back of a chimney to prevent the accumulation of snow and ice, and to deflect water around the chimney. Cut-out: The open portions of a strip shingle between the tabs. Deck: The wooden surface, installed over the supporting framing members, to which the roofing is applied. Drip Edge: A non-corrosive, non-staining material used along the eaves and rakes to allow water run-off to drip clear of underlying construction. Eaves: The horizontal, lower edge of a sloped roof. Exposure: That portion of the roofing exposed to the weather after installation. For example, the exposure of IKO’s Cambridge shingles is 149 mm (5 ⅞). Fiberglass Mat: An asphalt roofing base material manufactured from glass fibers. 36 GLOSSARY
  • 36. Flashing: Pieces of metal or roll roofing used to prevent seepage of water into a building around any intersection or projection in a roof such as vent pipes, chimneys, adjoining walls, dormers, and valleys. Galvanized metal flashing should be minimum 28-gauge. Granules: Ceramic-coated colored crushed rock that is applied to the exposed surface of asphalt roofing products. IKO makes its own granules at our Madoc, Ontario, and Ashcroft, British Columbia granule plants. Granules protect the asphalt coating from the sun’s rays, add color to the product and enhance fire resistance. Gutter: The trough that channels water from the eaves to the downspout. Also known as an eavestrough. Hip: The inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. Runs from the ridge to the eaves. Hip Shingles: Shingles used to cover the inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. IKO makes specific Hip and Ridge, Hip Ridge 12 and UltraHPTM shingles for this pourpose. Ice Dam: Condition formed at the lower roof edge by the thawing and re-freezing of melted snow on the overhang. Can force water up and under shingles, causing leaks. Laminated Shingles: Strip shingles containing more than one layer of tabs to create extra thickness. Also called three-dimensional shingles or architectural shingles. IKO’s Crowne Slate, Grandeur, Cambridge, Royal Estate and Armourshake are all laminated shingles. Low Slope Application: Method of installing asphalt shingles on roof slopes 2:12 (9.5°) - 4:12 (18.4°). Mansard Roof: A type of roof containing two sloping planes of different pitch on each of four sides. The lower plane has a much steeper pitch than the upper, often approaching vertical. Contains no gables. Mineral-Surfaced Roofing: Asphalt shingles and rolled roofing that are covered with granules. Nesting: A method of re-roofing with new asphalt shingles over old shingles in which the top edge of the new shingle is butted against the bottom edge of the existing shingle tab. Offset: The distance between the edge of one shingle course and the edge of the next successive shingle course. Open Valley: Method of valley construction in which shingles on both sides of the valley are trimmed along a chalk line snapped on each side of the valley. Shingles do not extend across the valley. Valley flashing is exposed. Racking: Roofing application method in which shingle courses are applied vertically up the roof rather than across and up. Typically, this is not a recommended procedure. Rake: The inclined edge of a sloped roof over a wall. Release Tape: A plastic film strip that is applied to the back of self-sealing shingles. This strip prevents the shingles from sticking together in the bundles only, and does not need to be removed for application. Ridge: The uppermost, horizontal external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. 37  GLOSSARY
  • 37. Rise: The vertical distance from the eaves line to the ridge. Run: The horizontal distance from the eaves to a point directly under the ridge. One half the span. Self-Adhered Eave and Flashing Membrane: A self-adhering bituminous waterproofing shingle underlayment designed to protect against water infiltration due to ice dams and wind-driven rain. IKO offers three ice and water protector products: GoldShield, ArmourGard and StormShield, which are generally available in various sizes. Self-Sealing Strip or Spot: Factory-applied adhesive that bonds shingle courses together when exposed to the heat of the sun after application. Shading: Slight differences in shingle color that may occur as a result of normal manufacturing operations. Slope: The degree of roof incline expressed as the ratio of the rise, in inches, to the run, in inches. (e.g. 18.5° (4:12) slope) Soffit: The finished underside of the eaves, which should contain holes or perforations to provide air intake for attic ventilation. Starter Strip: Asphalt roofing applied at the eaves that provides protection by filling in the spaces under the cut-outs and joints of the first course of shingles. IKO’s Leading Edge Plus is a pre-made starter strip product ideally suited for this application. Step Flashing: Flashing application method used where a vertical surface meets a sloping roof plane. Tab: The exposed portion of strip shingles defined by cut-outs. Underlayment: Asphalt saturated felt, such as IKO’s AM 15 Asphalt Saturated Felt, RoofGard-SB or RoofGard-Cool Grey Synthetic Underlayments, used beneath roofing to provide additional protection for the deck. Valley: The internal angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. Vent: Any outlet for air that protrudes through the roof deck such as a pipe or stack. Any device installed on the roof, gable or soffit for the purpose of ventilating the underside of the roof deck. Woven Valley: Method of valley construction in which shingles from both sides of the valley extend across the valley and are woven together by overlapping alternate courses as they are applied. The valley flashing is not exposed. 38 GLOSSARY 
  • 38. For additional information on IKO’s full line of superior roofing products, please call: United States 1-888-IKO-ROOF Eastern Canada 1-888-766-2468, Western Canada 1-800-661-1034, or visit our web site at: www.iko.com Note:The information in this literature is subject to change without notice.All values shown are approximate. IKO assumes no responsibility for errors that may appear in this literature. © Copyright 02/11 MR1M001 - English

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