Social media for non profits Aug 2010

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  • Malcolm Gladwell has been critical of social media for social change because it creates weak social ties, this relates largely to the fact that it was created to serve egotism, marketing and advertising in my opinion. But it can still be used by us.
  • I’ve used social media as a tool for people and businesses to go through BOB rather than to BOB. But to do it I have had to create much content in house. The Blog has helped to create an intellectual identity that resonates and has received attention that has seen it incorporated into mainstream media and garnered attention from supporting ministries or organizations.
  • Brownen has directed content through her social media apps to similarly build identity and to keep the buzz going. Has not relied too heavily on in-house content but has aggregated external content and disseminated it through her tools.
  • Many other non-profits exist to change perceptions or challenge values.
  • So make friends, add good links and ask for links in return. Post links to university research or profs and cite credible news sources in your blog. Chances are good they’ll see you linked to them and they might refer back to you. It’s happened to me several times and it spikes traffic for sure.
  • Put your communications plan in their hands, ask them to help you craft your plan for social media engagement, a blogging guide and some rules for posting content but don’t leave them as your only point of social contact or only source of creative content for your org. Chances are you have numerous creative and smart staff who can write and may in fact enjoy writing, and that is the great strength of your organization when it comes to social media. Capitalize on it. Or think of it this way. If you want thousands of people, or millions, to be engaged in a dialogue with your organization does it make sense to have ONE person trying to engage them?
  • A great example is from a friend and colleague who works for the united nations and International Institute for Child Rights and Development, Centre for Global Studies, University of Victoria (--We are an NGO & an Academic Institute)
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