Feurt Practice And Potential Of Ebm

  • 358 views
Uploaded on

The Practice and Potential of Ecosystem-Based Management …

The Practice and Potential of Ecosystem-Based Management
Applying lessons from land use and coastal management in Maine hosted by Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve,
Maine Coastal Program, Maine Sea Grant,the University of New England, and the Ecosystem-based Management Tools Network

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
358
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Communication Consultation and Collaboration in service of Conservation

Transcript

  • 1. The Practice and Potential of Ecosystem-based Management Christine Feurt, Ph.D. Coordinator, Coastal Training Program Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve Director, Center for Sustainable Communities University of New England Recognizing Ecosystem-based Management
  • 2. Ecosystem Management Meffe et al., 2002
    • Retain, restore and sustain ecosystem integrity
    • Make the places we live, work and play noticeably better today and in the future.
    • Based upon a collaboratively developed vision of desired future outcomes that integrates ecological, socioeconomic and institutional perspectives
    • Applied within a geographic framework defined primarily by natural ecological boundaries.
  • 3. Overview of Today’s Presentations
    • Watershed Management, Land Use Regulations, and Headwater Stream Conservation Steve Burns
    • Coastal Resiliency, Science and Community Planning for Sea Level Rise and the Perfect Storm Pete Slovinsky
    • Community Viz and Municipal Conservation Planning Judy Colby-George
  • 4. Overview of Today’s Presentations
    • Beginning with Habitat: Challenges and Tools for Statewide Biodiversity Conservation Bethany Adkins
    • A Model for Science, Stewardship and Adaptive Management in Taunton Bay
    • John Sowles
    • Collaborative Learning for Stakeholder Engagement-Social Science and Ecosystem Management Chris Feurt
  • 5. Elements of Ecosystem Management With a Focus on Land Use
    • A collaboratively developed vision of desired future outcomes
    • Indicators of success and a mechanism for tracking progress
    • Interdisciplinary science as a measure of ecosystem sustainability
    • Identification and engagement of stakeholders
    • Place – a workable geographic boundary
  • 6.
    • Collaborative Learning for Stakeholder Engagement:
    • Social Science and Ecosystem Management
    • Challenges
    • Overcoming barriers to:
    • Watershed Management Plan implementation
    • Science application to policy/management
    • Adoption of best management practices
  • 7.  
  • 8.
    • Retain, restore and sustain ecosystem integrity
    • Make the places we live, work and play noticeably better today and in the future.
    • Based upon a collaboratively developed vision of desired future outcomes that integrates ecological, socioeconomic and institutional perspectives
    • Applied within a geographic framework defined primarily by natural ecological boundaries.
    Ecosystem Management and Land Use
  • 9. The Collaborative Learning Bridge A social science tool for Ecosystem Management Applying Social Science Tools Collaborative Learning Stakeholder Analysis Wells NERR Science Products Water Quality Data Watershed Surveys Watershed Management Plans Management & Policy Land Use Watershed Management Application of BMPs Perceptual Barriers Disciplinary Barriers Institutional Barriers Institutional Analysis Cultural Analysis
  • 10. Working Through Environmental Conflict The Collaborative Learning Approach By Steven E. Daniels and Gregg B. Walker (2001)
    • “ A framework and set of techniques intended for multiparty decision situations…
    • A means of designing and implementing a series of events to promote:
    • Creative thought,
      • Constructive debate and the
      • Effective implementation of proposals that the stakeholders generate.”
    • Theoretical Grounding: Systems, Conflict, Adult Learning
    • Progress not Consensus
  • 11. Knowledge of Stakeholder Values, Attitudes and Beliefs Applied to Collaborative Learning Model Watershed Management Assessment {Training in CL Skills} Implementation And Facilitation Evaluation Adapted from Daniels and Walker, 2001 Design
  • 12. ASSESSMENT: Wells NERR Coastal Training Program Water is Threatened Coastal Trainers Provide Science-based Knowledge Municipal Decisions Contribute to Threats to Water Municipal Actions with Outcomes for Protecting Water Public Works Code Officer Planning Board ?
  • 13. Logic Model/ Program Planning ADDIE Process Collaborative Learning Conflict Theory Adult Learning Theory Systems Theory (+ Diffusion of Innovations) (+ Community Based Social Marketing) Action Research Instructional Systems Design Environmental Communication Institutional Analysis How can knowledge of the perspectives and values of stakeholders be used to improve ecosystem management? Ethnographic Interviews Participant Observation Cultural Models Theory Grounded Theory: Constant Comparison Method Cultural Anthropology Discourse Analysis Stakeholder Analysis What are the perspectives and values of water, its management and pollution, used by stakeholders in municipal decision-making? Strategic Tools : Theory & Practice Linking Multiple Disciplines to EM Research Question
  • 14. Understanding Stakeholder Perspectives and Values
    • Why is water important?
    • What are threats to water?
    • What can be done to protect water?
  • 15. Stakeholder Values Nature Produces Water, the Source of Life Water is a Resource to Use and Manage
  • 16. Perceptions of Threats to Water’s Value Water is Threatened Chemical Lawn Chemicals, Fertilizer, Petroleum/Car byproducts, Nutrients, N and Ph, Ammonia & Chlorine from sewage treatment plant (STP), Pesticides, Mercury, Atmospheric pollutants, Asphalt MTBE, Arsenic, Road salt, Sand & deicing chemicals Biological Human sewage, Pet Waste Red Tide, Domestic Livestock Waste, Wildlife Waste, E. Coli Physical Sediment (silt & soil), Trash, Amount and force of flowing water, Temperature Threats Loss is Experienced Beach Closures Property Values Fish Kills
  • 17. 7 Ways of Knowing A Knowledge Resource for Collaborative Learning Governance (GOV) Science (SCI) Local (LOC) Ecological (ECO) Educational Practices (EDU) Technological (TEC) Land Use (LAN) Knowledge
  • 18. Combined Ways of Knowing Ecological Knowledge Public Works Director Educational Practices Knowledge Science Knowledge Local Knowledge Governance Knowledge Land Use Knowledge Land Use Knowledge Technological Knowledge Local Knowledge Town Planner Scientist
  • 19. DESIGN Engaging the Kaleidoscope of Expertise Municipal Officials as a Resource not a Receptacle ECO Water is Threatened Water is Valued SCI LAN TEC GOV EDU LOC Water is Protected Planning & Land Use Land Conservation Drinking H2O Research & Monitoring Education & Outreach Regs & Enforcement Engineering & Public Safety Citizen Stewardship
  • 20.  
  • 21. IMPLEMENTATION & FACILITATION
  • 22. Assemble and activate the kaleidoscope of expertise
    • Shared missions - Watershed Management Plan linked to Comprehensive Plans
    • Elected official approval
    • Municipal/State/Federal, NGO, water districts
    • An experiment for a summer
    • Meetings, field trips, breakfast at the Cockpit Café
  • 23. Identify shared values of water and perceptions of threats as fuel for collaboration
  • 24. Make conflicts explicit through dialogue and deliberation Sanford Regional Airport: Where water quality meets homeland security Property rights vs ….
  • 25. … Property Responsibilities Ecosystem Services and Green Infrastructure Sustaining the Commons
  • 26. EVALUATION:
    • Putting a face and a place on ecosystem management
    • Recognize ecosystem management at local scale
    • Share Lessons in the Landscape
    • Place-based opportunities for dialogue & deliberation
    • Track outcomes & progress
  • 27. Evaluation to Assessment
    • Action Research Multi-media Approach
    • Progress on watershed action items
    • Stakeholder consensus to continue
    • Stakeholder survey
    • Stakeholder interviews
    • Elected official consensus to continue
    • Grant funding for group generated projects
  • 28. Christine Feurt 207.646.1555 x111 [email_address] Collaborative Learning Guide November 2008 EBM Tools Training Wells NERR Nov 19 & 20 CICEET Project Explorer – Feurt/Final Report December 2008 http://www.ciceet.unh.edu/
  • 29. Elements of Ecosystem Management With a Focus on Land Use
    • A collaboratively developed vision of desired future outcomes
    • Indicators of success and a mechanism for tracking progress
    • Interdisciplinary science as a measure of ecosystem sustainability
    • Identification and engagement of stakeholders
    • Place – a workable geographic boundary
  • 30. Selected References Bernard, H. ed. 1998. Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology . New York: Altamira Press. Daniels, S. and G. Walker. 2001. Working Through Environmental Conflict: The Collaborative Learning Approach. Westport, CT: Praeger Feurt, C. 2007. Protecting Our Children’s Water, Using Cultural Models to Frame and Implement Ecosystem Based Management. Ph.D. Dissertation, Antioch University New England. Keene, New Hampshire. Glaser, B. and A. Strauss. 1967. The Discovery of Grounded Theory . New York: Aldine de Gruyter. Greenwood, D and Levin, M. 1998. Introduction to Action Research, Social Research for Social Change . Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Gunderson, L. and C. Holling, eds. 2001. Panarchy: Understanding Transformations in Systems of Humans and Nature . Washington, D. C.: Island Press. Holland, D. and N. Quinn. 1987. Cultural Models in Language and Thought . Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Lubchenco, J. 1998. Entering the century of the environment: A new social contract for science. Science 279: 491-497. Kempton, W., J. Boster and J. Hartley. 1995. Environmental Values in American Culture. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  • 31. Krum, C. and C. Feurt. 2002. Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, Coastal Training Program: Market Analysis and Needs Assessment. Wells NERR: Wells, ME. Lee, K. 1993. Compass and Gyroscope. Integrating science and politics for the environment . Washington, D. C.: Island Press. Meffe, G., L. Nielsen, R. Knight, D. Schenborn. 2002. Ecosystem Management, Adaptive, Community-Based Conservation . Washington, DC: Island Press. NRC. 2005. Decision Making for the Environment. DC: National Academies Press. Paolisso, M. 2002. Blue crabs and controversy on the Chesapeake Bay: A cultural model for understanding watermen’s reasoning about blue crab management. Human Organization 61 (3): 226-239. Quinn, N. ed. 2005. Finding Culture in Talk, A Collection of Methods. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Salafsky, N.,et al., 2001. Adaptive Management: A Tool For Conservation Practitioners. Available at www.fosonline.org Weiss, R. S. 1994. Learning from Strangers, The Art and Method of Qualitative Interview Studies . New York: The Free Press.
  • 32.