Comm Studies Regional Dialect

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Regional dialect

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Comm Studies Regional Dialect

  1. 1. Welcome to Communication and Culture (Unit 1). Re-cap on last lesson: According to Burleston (1996) and Samter (1994) – what do women’s conversations tend to focus on? Without looking at your notes, jot down your answers:
  2. 2. According to Clark (1998)….. <ul><li>What kind of statements do women’s conversations tend to have? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Is language ‘biased’ against women – if so, how? <ul><li>Think about ‘red-top’ tabloid newspapers… </li></ul>
  4. 4. The way men or women speak can be described as a language ‘code’. <ul><li>A language ‘code’ is an expected way of speaking for a group of people (e.g. men or women). </li></ul><ul><li>It’s like a set of rules about what and how you should speak. </li></ul><ul><li>A language code depends on a shared understanding of these ‘rules’ – other people must know what they are. </li></ul>
  5. 5. For instance, are there language codes (things you should do) for: <ul><li>Opening and closing a conversation? </li></ul><ul><li>Taking turns in a conversation? </li></ul><ul><li>Asking a stranger for directions? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Language codes may vary around the country though! <ul><li>But first…………. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you have an accent? </li></ul><ul><li>Has someone from outside the Midlands </li></ul><ul><li>ever commented on your accent? </li></ul><ul><li>Which other accents (cities or regions) do you like – and </li></ul><ul><li>why? </li></ul><ul><li>What accents do you dislike? </li></ul><ul><li>Do some accents have more status than others? </li></ul>
  7. 7. Regional language codes can include: <ul><li>Accent – the way words sound or are pronounced . </li></ul><ul><li>Dialect – the rules of vocabulary / word choice and grammar for that area. </li></ul><ul><li>So, should it matter how you speak? </li></ul>
  8. 8. FACT ! <ul><li>During the Second World War people in Norfolk were tested to see if they were German spies – by their pronunciation of place names. </li></ul><ul><li>How would you pronounce the following? </li></ul><ul><li>Wymondham. </li></ul><ul><li>Costessey </li></ul>
  9. 9. Answers : <ul><li>Wymondham is pronounced “Windum”. </li></ul><ul><li>Costessey is said “Cossey”. </li></ul><ul><li>But what did the following dialect words refer to in Norfolk? </li></ul><ul><li>A “bishy barney bee”. </li></ul><ul><li>A “tittermorter” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Trickalating” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Slant and dicular” </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Answers are: <ul><li>A bishy barney bee – ladybird. </li></ul><ul><li>Tittermorter – a seesaw. </li></ul><ul><li>Tricklatating – decorating. </li></ul><ul><li>Slant and dicular – not squarely hung . </li></ul><ul><li>Obvious really! </li></ul>
  11. 11. The highest status pronunciation: <ul><li>This is usually associated with the South-East of England or Middle-classes: </li></ul><ul><li>Received pronunciation (RP). </li></ul><ul><li>Also know as: the Queen’s English or BBC English . </li></ul><ul><li>(It also uses very few regional dialect words and grammar either). </li></ul><ul><li>Questions: (a) why is Received Pronunciation so high status? </li></ul><ul><li>(b) Is it right that it is still high status? </li></ul><ul><li>(c) Does it give you more power if you use it? </li></ul>
  12. 12. Speech / language codes therefore: <ul><li>Contribute to our social identity – where we are from. We may feel more at ‘home’ with similar others. </li></ul><ul><li>Can affect how others think of us – others may believe our accent or dialect is ‘high’ or ‘low’ status. </li></ul><ul><li>May influence the decisions of others – whether to give us a job or not, on the basis of accent or dialect. Prejudice has consequences! </li></ul>

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