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Housing and Cities as Human Rights: Dialogues between Latin America and Canada
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Housing and Cities as Human Rights: Dialogues between Latin America and Canada

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This presentation examines urban reform in Latin American and Canada. …

This presentation examines urban reform in Latin American and Canada.

Lorena Zárate
www.wellesleyinstitute.com
Follow us on twitter @wellesleyWI

Published in: Environment

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  • HIC-AL Informe de actividades y productos 2008
  • Transcript

    • 1. Housing and cities as human rights:dialogues between Latin America & Canada Lorena Zárate HIC Habitat International Coalition Wellesley institute, Toronto February 14th, 2013
    • 2. Habitat International Coalition International independent and non profit network, created in 1976. 350 NGO’s, community based organizations, research and teaching institutes, professionals and activists in 125 countries. Working on human habitat related issues (technical, social, economical & political contents). www.hic-net.org
    • 3. General objective and strategies Promotion, defense and fullfilment of the right of every person to a place to live in peace and dignity (land and housing rights, human rights related to habitat, right to the city) Strenghthen social actors and processes (social production of habitat, human rights defense). Advocacy for housing and habitat public policies at local, national and international level.
    • 4. Thematic areas EnvironmentGender Human rights Production of habitat
    • 5. The Right to the City is…The equitable use and enjoyment of the city under the principles of:SustainabilityDemocracyEquitySocial Justice New collective right
    • 6. The Right to the CityHuman rights Democracy Equity Representative, Social Justice distributive, direct Territory Sustainability Planning and Public managment
    • 7. David Harvey, 2008 The Right to the City as … The excercise of a collective power to transform the urbanization process. The right to change ourselves, by changing the city.
    • 8. Mexico City Charterfor theRight to the City
    • 9. Elaboration process: 2007-12Promoter Committee = - Urban Popular Movement - Mexico City Government - Human Rights Commission - Human Rights NGOs - Habitat International Coalition-Latin AmericaActivities = o + 60 meetings o Public activities = + 5,000 people o Workshops / Radio programs / Children´s painting contest o Human Rights Fair / Videos / Publications / Blog / Website
    • 10. Mexico City Charter for the Right to the City Signed on 13 July, 2010 New legal status for the city (Constitution?)  Changes in legal framework  Changes in public administration  Allocation of specific resources
    • 11. Signed by 253 representatives of  Civil society organizations - Indigenous and campesino groups - Cooperatives - Tenants - Street sellers and workers - Unions - NGOs - Women organizations - Youth organizations - etc.  Academic institutions  Professional organizations
    • 12. Right to the City strategic principles Social function of land, property & city Human Democratic rights in management the city Democratic Democratic production enjoyment & of the city productive Sustainable habitat & responsible management of the commons
    • 13. Full citizenship /full exercise of human rights in the cityRealization of political, economic, social, culturaland environmental human rights withoutdiscrimination.Ensure collective dignity and well-being in conditionsof equality, equity, justice and solidarity.Generate conditions for the development of adignified quality of life for all in the city, at bothindividual and collective levels.
    • 14. The social function of the city, land and propertyDistribution and regulation of urban land, space andthe equitable use of common goods, services andopportunities offered by the city, prioritizing the-collectively defined- public interest.Guarantee the right of all persons to a secure placeto live in peace and dignity through the creation of legalinstruments and participatory mechanisms that opposespeculation, urban segregation, exclusion, forcedevictions and displacements.
    • 15. Democratic urban managementCitizen participation at the highest levels of decision-making, including the design, implementation,monitoring and evaluation of public policies, urbanplanning, budgeting and control of urban processes.Strengthen democracy through the creation ofdecision-making spaces and mechanisms of directdemocracy.
    • 16. The democratic production of urban space and productive habitat Facilitate the right to participate in the social production of habitat and to guarantee the productive insertion of all in the urban economy, including youth. Development of economic activities that contribute to a productive city of solidarity.
    • 17. The sustainable and responsible management of environmental, cultural andenergy resources as common goods in the citySocially responsible use of resources and theenjoyment of a healthy environment that allows allpeople and communities to develop under equalconditions.Guarantee improved environmental conditions andthat urban development does not take place at the costof rural communities, ecological reserves, other citiesor future generations.
    • 18. The democratic and equitable enjoyment of the cityStrengthening of social solidarityExpansion and improvement of public spaces.Rescue and strengthen the cultural and recreationalenjoyment of public spaces and the respect for culturaldiversity in the city.
    • 19. The strategy for implementationa) incorporation of the Charter into new and existing city laws, policies and planning initiatives;b) promotion and dissemination of the Charter among government workers, social organizations and citizens;c) organization of local action committees to advance the Charter’s objectives in different areas of the city;d) political commitments from elected representatives within the Federal District who are being asked to sign and implement the Charter in
    • 20. Tensions to think about…Housing policy Massive construction of housesHousing policy Urban/territorial planningRight to housing Right to the cityImmediate needs Long-term transformationsMetropolitan areas Small citiesFormality InformalityUrban agenda Rural agenda
    • 21. HIC-AL publications (available on-line)
    • 22. HICHabitat International Coalition More information: www.hic-net.org Contact: hicpresident@hic-net.org @hicpresident

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