Your Brand? OUR Brand. (Designer Edition)

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My presentation from the October 2009 Seattle Graphic Artists Guild. This one discusses the process of branding as it applies to smaller businesses and independent contractors. …

My presentation from the October 2009 Seattle Graphic Artists Guild. This one discusses the process of branding as it applies to smaller businesses and independent contractors.

My process, shown here at a high level, is an amalgam of best practices from Landor, Ogilvy and JWT...without the $300 words. :)

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  • So what’s up with branding? It used to be that large branding specialty firms like Landor and Interbrand took home handsome sums to do deep dives into audience’s minds, test messaging, craft value propositions, and produce strategist that informed creative efforts. But recent surveys show huge disparities in a basic understanding of what branding is. Is it identity? A consumer’s experience? Kids from b-schools are equating it with advertising! Or is it the classic Ogilvy definition: a promise to purchasers of consistent behavior, experience and benefit?
  • And how did we get to this sorry state? Simple. Any corporate activity that does not support a quarterly goal is pushed aside for the quarter. Which means from now until a branding “crisis” hits.
  • This includes messaging, positioning, integration of strategic goals into an offering’s DNA. It’s not unlike the classic cocktail party metaphor. When you go to a party, you choose your dress, hairstyle, brush your teeth. You may affect a manner, try to be entertaining. You may wear a lampshade on your head. You may be a wallflower. But you decide these things before leaving the “house.”
  • Now, you can do all that work and be the best, most interesting person you can be. But as in real life, your market will react to your stated brand attributes. Only THIS time, that gossip is LOUD. It is not controllable. At best, you can coach or steer it.
  • Our brand, including you. You craft and present your brand but consumers can make a huge impact on market perception. Despite this sounding dire, it’s actually an incredible opportunity for marketers.
  • Four-year blogging campaign to gather conversation around an Ohio Ikea. Successfully lobbied for a store in Cincinnati. Applied for a job: no response. Google search showed her blog ranked higher than Ikea.com. Execs sent cease-and-desist and demanded URL. Store was built…
  • Here’s Jen. She even created a Norse patron saint of allen wrenches. Here she is in front of her tent, camping out waiting for the store to open.
  • Jen created this much excitement about a new Ikea store and store security forced them to move on. Eventually, Ikea Marketing figured out what was happening and intervened.IKEA DESTROYED THEIR FAN POWER BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T REALIZE HOW FAR THINGS HAVE COME.
  • Show an example of a bloger
  • DON’T DESTROY TRUST – YOUR WORDS ARE PUBLIC AND YOU WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE
  • This is where you maximize your relevance to your target audience.
  • Comcast now has a staff of 10 handling customer service over Twitter. Response times are considerably quicker than through the call center, and they have been awarded by Forrester Mktg as an example of a customer-focused innovator.

Transcript

  • 1. Your brand? OUR BRAND. Branding in the Era of the Empowered Consumer Eric Weaver | Tribal DDB 10/27/09
  • 2. Tonight ◼  Definitions and realities ◼  Four cultural changes that have turned the world upside-down ◼  Trust and its impact on revenue ◼  Rethinking the brand in terms of trust ◼  Social media branding makeovers ◼  Final thoughts/Q&A 2
  • 3. Definitions and realities less than a minute ago - Comment - Like 3
  • 4. Branding: so much confusion. Many definitions: is it identity? Experience? Advertising? Gut feeling? A promise? October 21 at 6:31pm - Comment - Like - See Wall-to-Wall 4
  • 5. Slight prob: suggesting any expense of time/ money that does not support a quarterly earnings goal is often political suicide. October 21 at 6:32pm - Comment - Like - See Wall-to-Wall 5
  • 6. The process of crafting a unique value proposition for reception (& now interaction) w/one’s market. Have to go to mkt with something. October 21 at 6:33pm - Comment - Like - See Wall-to-Wall 6
  • 7. Old-school control of brand, msg is a bit like controlling gossip. You may “steer” it but really, that’s about it. O.M.G. Did u see that tagline? October 21 at 6:34pm - Comment - Like - See Wall-to-Wall 7
  • 8. Why? BOOMERS = propriety. Trained in formalities, don’t offend, guarded means safe, not so great with “random.” Suit & tie = trust. 2:57 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint GENS X&Y = affinity. Formalities ignored, sharing means finding, tech is easy, random is life. Consider your lens. Suit & tie = distrust. 2:57PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 8
  • 9. In fact, 66% of customer touchpoints ABOUT YOU are now CUSTOMER GENERATED 6:35 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint (McKinsey Quarterly, June 2009)
  • 10. And it’s not only consumers who are creating touchpoints. 6:39 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 11. THE REALITY: your brand is now our brand. Brands must consider implications of social media. And that’s why it’s more important than ever. 6:40 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 12. Let’s look at the business of promoting a brand. less than a minute ago - Comment - Like 12
  • 13. Outbound mktg is a $1TT machine. Each niche = a full industry. We're rewarded for storytelling/ intrusion/ repetition. Unchanged in 150 yrs. 6:41 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 13
  • 14. Our customers, however, have changed. Maybe a lot, LOLZ. 6:42PM Oct 21from TwitterBerry 14
  • 15. Commercialism starting to smell like self-interest. Consumers flee to social netwks where they could connect w/like minds, pitch-free. 6:45 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 16. The waning Outbound Voice: RT @TNSMedia Intelligence US ad spend plunges 14.2%; only online posts growth. 6:52 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 16
  • 17. Four major cultural changes are killing the outbound model and amplifying dialogue. less than a minute ago - Comment - Like 17
  • 18. CHANGE #1: trust has fallen off a cliff. (RT @edelman) 6:55 PM Oct 21 from Edelman Trust Barometer 18
  • 19. RT @edelman: “banks, automotives, media and insurance hit hardest in US.” Wonder abt schools, cops, doctors (societal pillars) 6:56 PM Oct 21 from from Edelman Trust Barometer 19
  • 20. CHANGE #2: time starvation, micro-niche interests, endlessly-customizable media options, expecting free information 6:59 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 20
  • 21. #SEARCH: people, products, info, media I care abt; #EXPRESSION via blogs, opinion sites, ratings; #SHARING what we like, or hate About a minute ago - Comment - Like Generally, consumers don’t need advertising, marketing or PR (#TimeToRethink) 7:00 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 21
  • 22. CUSTOMERS BLOGGERS EMPLOYEES TRADE ORGS CHANGE #3: THE NEW CACOPHONY. MEDIA INVESTORS ANALYSTS MARKETERS GOVERNMENT
  • 23. CHANGE #4: people turn to PEERS when risk is high, more choices to review, less time for research. #remarkable 7:04 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 23
  • 24. Most credible ppl giving me company/product info? 47% believe in PEERS. 13% trust marketers. #wakeupcall #outboundvoice 7:05 PM Oct 21 from 2009 Edelman Trust Barometer 24
  • 25. Trust isn’t just influential, it’s widely shared. 56% age 35-64, 63% 25-34 share trust/distrust on the web. 7:06 PM Oct 21 from 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer 25
  • 26. Trust drives preference: 91% choose to buy from companies they trust, 77% refuse the distrusted. Bottom line: TRUST DRIVES TRANSACTIONS. 7:07 PM Oct 21 from 2009 Edelman Trust Barometer 26
  • 27. Growing revenue not abt clever, elegant, loud. Not abt tools! Nor Ashton/Oprah. Not abt Social Media change. IT’S ABT PPL TRUSTING YOU. 7:08 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 28
  • 28. CONSUMERS WANT PROOF OF INTENT: “How much more would u trust a company for taking these actions?” 7:10 PM Oct 21 from Edelman Trust Barometer 29
  • 29. So build a trust strategy. Where are u trusted? distrusted? Reexamine brand attribs, think thru proof points and executional steps. less than a minute ago - Comment - Like 30
  • 30. Look for and target ur organization’s trust soft-spots. Rebuild trust there w/proof pts. Be real. Take fodder from conspiracy theorists. 7:14 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 31
  • 31. Brand zealotry: the story of jen
  • 32. THE BRANDING PROCESS 38
  • 33. STEP 1: identify your existing brand equity WHAT’S YOUR STORY? WHAT ARE YOUR TRAITS? WHAT’S YOUR NOBLE PURPOSE?
  • 34. Step 1: what’s your relevant story? ◼  STACY RENTON: Grew up in the Northwest, got into design at Central. Enjoy creating elegant solutions to client problems. ◼  At 38, I’m a little older, a little wiser. Kids these days often don’t see the value in being detail-oriented. They don’t have the interest or stamina for it. I do. ◼  Random fact: when I was a kid, I loved the look of money. My friends and I designed money, tried to recreate it. Bought Copperplate-font ink stamps. I still have those old construction paper bills. ◼  I can’t stand working for clients or in shops where it’s rush rush rush all the time. Mistakes are made. If people would chill, they’d realize that volume doesn’t always equal success. ◼  My main purpose is to help my clients’ marketing efforts look as good as they can. I’m not happy unless they are. Although high- maintenance clients drive me nuts and I’m not always nice in the face of drama or someone else’s poor planning. 40
  • 35. Step 1: identify your unique traits, good and bad ◼  Slow and steady ◼  Quality-focused ◼  Not into trying new things ◼  Quiet ◼  Single-threading ◼  Good at print ◼  Prefer process ◼  Open-minded to change but not great at it ◼  Committed to being green, responsible ◼  CWU grad, WA native ◼  Love illustration and handiwork, but not really focusing on it ◼  RULE OF THUMB: don’t lie, stretch the truth, or exaggerate. 41
  • 36. Step 1: identify your unique traits, good and bad PERSONALITY: ◼  Hard working — I get stuff ◼  Mellow, laid back done ◼  Unassuming, not stuck up ◼  Tried and true, easy smile, PERSONA: easy laugh ◼  Michelle Obama ◼  A good listener ◼  Marg Helgenberger ◼  Take things pretty seriously, ◼  Chris Gregoire? don’t really joke around much ◼  Others? ◼  Was more of a partier back in my youth — now I have bigger things to worry about ◼  I delight in seeing happy clients — makes me feel fulfilled 42
  • 37. STEP 2: identify the market WHO IS YOUR AUDIENCE? WHICH OF THEM ARE THE HIGHEST VALUE? WHAT DO THEY WANT YOU TO BE?
  • 38. STEP 2: identify the market DEFINE YOUR BUYERS ◼  Marketing directors for mid-sized firms, who have designers on staff but frequently need help (irregular income) ◼  Small businesses who need small project work or identity work done (high maintenance) ◼  Outsourcing shops like Filter who bring me on for projects, sometimes short, sometimes long (steady work if you can get it) ◼  A couple of firms with multi-SKU packaging efforts (fun!) ◼  Local magazines and newspapers that need illustration and like my funky styling (joyous for me) 44
  • 39. STEP 2: identify the market TRIAGE: 1.  Local magazines and newspapers that need illustration and like my funky styling (joyous for me) 2.  A couple of firms with multi-SKU packaging efforts (fun!) 3.  Outsourcing shops like Filter who bring me on for projects, sometimes short, sometimes long (steady work if you can get it) 4.  Marketing directors for mid-sized firms, who have designers on staff but frequently need help (irregular income) 5.  Small businesses who need small project work or identity work done (high maintenance) 45
  • 40. Step 2: identify what your market is looking for MY TRAITS: RELEVANT MARKET DESIRES: ◼  Slow and steady ◼  Fast ◼  Quality-focused ◼  Quality-focused ◼  Not into trying new things ◼  Dependable ◼  Quiet ◼  Low-maintenance ◼  Single-threading ◼  Full attention to projects ◼  Good at print ◼  Good at all media ◼  Prefer process ◼  Disliking mistakes/rework ◼  Open-minded to change but ◼  Flexible to client changes not great at it ◼  Committed to being green ◼  Good citizen ◼  CWU grad, WA native ◼  Local knowledge, connections ◼  Can get annoyed with clients ◼  High customer service ◼  Love illustration & handiwork ◼  Custom, ownable work 46
  • 41. Step 3: identify your desired brand equity FIND THE “YOU” THAT SOLVES YOUR MARKET’S PROBLEMS
  • 42. Step 3: identify the traits to maintain, add or delete ◼  Slow and steady (DEL) ◼  Fast (CANNOT CLAIM) ◼  Quality-focused (KEEP) ◼  Quality-focused ◼  Not into trying new things (CHG) ◼  Dependable ◼  Quiet (CHG) ◼  Low-maintenance ◼  Single-threading (CHG) ◼  Full attention to projects ◼  Good at print (KEEP) ◼  Good at all media ◼  Prefer process (CHG) ◼  Disliking mistakes/rework ◼  Open-minded to change but not ◼  Flexible to client changes great at it (DEL) ◼  Committed to being green ◼  Good citizen (KEEP) ◼  Local knowledge, ◼  CWU grad, WA native (CHG) connections ◼  Can get annoyed with clients ◼  High customer service (DEL) 48
  • 43. Step 3: identify the traits to maintain, add or delete KEEP: CHANGE ◼  Quality-focused ◼  Not into new things = ◼  Good at print dependable ◼  Committed to being green ◼  Quiet = low-maintenance ◼  Single-threading = full focus DE-EMPHASIZE: on projects ◼  Strong process = less rework ◼  Slow and steady ◼  CWU local = known ◼  Not great at change commodity, supplier ◼  Can get annoyed relationships 49
  • 44. Step 3: identify the traits to maintain, add or delete ◼  Quality-focused ◼  Good at print ◼  Committed to being green ◼  Dependable ◼  Low-maintenance ◼  Full focus on projects ◼  Less rework ◼  Known commodity, supplier relationships ◼  RULE OF THUMB: don’t lie, twist the truth, stretch or exaggerate. Okay to rephrase truthfully. 50
  • 45. Step 4: prioritize traits for messaging
  • 46. Step 4: prioritize traits for messaging CLIENT DISTRUST TRIGGERS: PRIORITIZE W/TRUST LENS: ◼  Previous designers have 1.  Dependable flaked mid-project, blowing 2.  Quality-focused deadlines, or worse yet, 3.  Less rework bailing 4.  Full focus on projects ◼  I can’t get my designer to get 5.  Low-maintenance it right the first time (and they still bill me) 6.  Good at print ◼  I’ll look bad if I recommend 7.  Committed to being green someone and they fail me 8.  Known commodity, supplier ◼  I want fast, cheap and good, relationships but first and foremost, it’s gotta look fantastic. I hate paying money to get half- assed creative. 52
  • 47. Step 4: prioritize traits for messaging LET’S TALK CLIENT BENEFITS ◼  Settling with a dependable designer means less to worry about, think about, in your busy day. ◼  Quality focus means less rework, less cost. That younger designer might take 3 times as long due to mistakes. ◼  Full attention to projects means things don’t fall through the cracks. No competition over your time with other clients. ◼  Quality focus means better ideas, graphic solutions; more likely to hit a home run with management (i.e., client looks good). POSITIONING AGAINST COMPETITION ◼  When you want it done right, you call me. ◼  Your day is insanely busy; I bring calm to the storm. ◼  I worry about the details so you don’t have to. ◼  Quality work brings peace of mind and greater career reward. 53
  • 48. Step 4: translating desired equity to tone & manner WHAT CREATIVE ATTRIBUTES (VOICE AND LOOK) REINFORCE THE NEW YOU?
  • 49. Step 4: translating desired equity to tone & manner MESSAGING TONE: ◼  Down-to-earth yet down-to-business ◼  Positive, easy to work with ◼  Always truthful and straightforward ◼  Informal language without being flip ◼  Would never waste time or money but would still be fun to work with COLORS: ◼  Deeper hues that connote trust, depth, seriousness ◼  Natural ocean blues and organic greens that add life and contrast ◼  A rusty orange to add a more vivid, lively accent color ◼  Lighter contrast to appear more feminine and less 55
  • 50. And why is this important again? ◼  Branding provides a benchmark for a client about the promise of you: ◼  The consistent traits that will always be there and always help them. ◼  The consistency in behavior that builds trust. ◼  And the benefits they’ll always get by choosing you. ◼  Social media means your brand will be taken into the marketplace for a continuous litmus test. ◼  Customers, competitors, friends will react to your brand, + and -. YOU CANNOT CONTROL THIS. ◼  Your actions, others’ actions, and events out of your control will shift your brand in various directions. ◼  As your brand “drifts,” determine what’s honest feedback worthy of a rethink, and what warrants you trying to bring it back to center. 56
  • 51. Social branding makeovers less than a minute ago - Comment - Like 57
  • 52. BEFORE: Starbucks was slow to adopt SocMed. A company built on “community.” This was what people found. 7:17 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 53. AFTER: Proof of interest in listening to the community. 75k ideas in 6 mos. 7:18 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 54. AFTER: Starbucks demonstrates commitment to giving back through its partners 7:19 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 55. BEFORE: consumer- generated brand hate. Customer service stymied by customer service. Remember, search loves conversation and extends across time. 7:20 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 56. AFTER: customer service superstars 7:22 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 57. BEFORE: quiet branding, low relevance to new customer base. 7:23 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 58. AFTER: trust generated, two million impressions, 2300 new accounts, $4 million happened. 7:24 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 64
  • 59. OTHERS: leveraging social causes to focus conversation (and brand) on giving back. 7:25 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint
  • 60. Final thoughts less than a minute ago - Comment - Like 66
  • 61. Branding provides your offering (you, your company, your team, your products, etc.) with a compass point that emphasizes your differentiation, your unique value and your competitive advantage. Social Media is your market having a voice in what it wants from you. Social media is also the way to provide proof points that build trust. When noise is high, product choice is high and trust is low, having a strong brand that is tied directly to your business’ DNA means you will be more memorable, more noteworthy and more trusted. And trust drives transactions. 67
  • 62. RECAP: Rethink your entire brand and mktg approach from a prospective of trust and with a wider lens. 7:28 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint Build trust by being found, demonstrating your knowledge, your vision and offering proof of trustworthiness. #linkedin 7:28 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint Finally, use social marketing to leverage the EXISTING TRUST already established between peers, rather than buying new trust. 7:29 PM Oct 21 from PowerPoint 68
  • 63. THANK YOU! AND QUESTIONS. me: twitter.com/weave company: tribalddb.ca slides: slideshare.net/weave