Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Bew William G Birkman Profile
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Bew William G Birkman Profile

523
views

Published on

My Brinkman personality profile

My Brinkman personality profile


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
523
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Individual ReportThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEWDate Printed13 January 2012 1 of 41
  • 2. Areas of InterestThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Areas of Interest The numbers listed below indicate percentile rank in broad occupational areas and give a good indication of the individuals occupational interest. Mechanical 90 Scientific 71 Literary 62 Persuasive 56 Musical 54 Numerical 49 Artistic 46 Outdoor 35 Social Service 24 Clerical 11Persuasive - Persuasive interactions with others. Motivating Numerical - Combining numbers analytically and factually toothers to accept ideas, actions or opinions through means of arrive at practical, quantitative conclusions. Utilizing numbers inpersuasion, reasoning or argument. business bookkeeping, accounting and tax procedures.Social Service - Organized assistance and services to support Clerical - Being involved in administrative positions includingand advance social conditions of the individual and community recording, data processing, numeric detail and personnel functionsthrough social programs, agencies and organized religious that require predictable results and specific controls.involvement. Artistic - Creating imaginative works of aesthetic value,Scientific - Involvement in professions or avocations that assist expressing ideas artistically. Working or performing in the visualothers through research. Occupations in health services, arts.technology and medical paraprofessionals, nutritional orpharmaceutical services involving scientific interests. Literary - Creative interest in writing and in sophisticated language skills. Indicates appreciation for abstract ideas conveyedMechanical - Hands-on work with a broad range of technical in various mediums and materials.responsibilities from power-driven machine operations to hightech electronics. Interests may include design, maintenance, Musical - Involvement with music in its many forms. Interestsoperation or repair of motors and machinery, power-driven or may include melodies, compositions, attending concerts,automated. supporting the musical arts, or simply appreciating music. Professional musicians would be expected to have a high degree ofOutdoor - Hands-on work in an outdoor or natural this interest.environment. These activities can include physical or mentalexertion outside of office confines. Some individuals score highbecause of environmental concerns. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 2 of 41
  • 3. Summary OneThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Components Usual Needs Stress99 50 1 1 50 99 6 Esteem Relating to Individuals 44 99 Acceptance Relating to People in Group 62 85 Structure Systems and Procedures 55 37 Authority Directing and Controlling 23 8 Advantage Incentives and Competition 8 86 Activity Preferred Pace for Action 86 59 Challenge Self Imposed Demands 59 10 Empathy Involvement of Feeling 10 81 Change Dealing with Change 6 33 Freedom Personal Independence 54 6 Thought Action or Reflection 48 Areas of Interest Life Style Grid® with Descriptors Mechanical 90 Scientific 71 Direct Communication Literary 62 Persuasive 56 Musical 54 People- Task- Numerical 49 Oriented Oriented Artistic 46 Outdoor 35 Social Service 24 TM Indirect Communication Clerical 11 Interests Usual Behavior Needs/Stress Behavior Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 3 of 41
  • 4. Needs GraphThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGFor each area, there are three bars, showing your usual style, your motivational needs, and the stress behavior whichmay result if the need is consistently unmet. Your scores appear in the circles on each bar.For any bar, the closer your score is to 99, the more the description on the right is likely to apply; the closer your scoreis to 1, the more the description on the left is likely to apply. 1. Relating to People Individually: how you deal with people one-on-one Usually: 1 6 99 direct and straightforward < a balance > insightful and intuitive Will need: 1 44 99 others to be frank and forthright < a balance > respect of key individuals To Avoid: 1 44 99 being too blunt < a balance > feeling unappreciated on occasions Esteem 2. Relating to People in Groups: how you deal with people in general Usually: 1 99 99 able to work well alone < a balance > friendly and easy to know Will need: 1 62 99 plenty of time alone or in small groups < a balance > to feel part of the group To Avoid: 1 62 99 impatient with group interaction < a balance > over-valuing group opinion Acceptance 3. Systems and Procedures: your planning and organizing style Usually: 1 85 99 flexible and open to new approaches < a balance > organized and sequential Will need: 1 55 99 only an outline plan to follow < a balance > a definite plan in place To Avoid: 1 55 99 weakness in follow-through < a balance > over-insistence on following procedures Structure Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 4 of 41
  • 5. Needs GraphThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING 4. Direction and Control: how you deal with authority Usually: 1 37 99 low-key in the exercise of authority < a balance > directive and commanding Will need: 1 23 99 a non-directive, democratic environment < a balance > to know who is in charge To Avoid: 1 75 99 failing to address issues of control < a balance > becoming domineering, controlling Authority 5. Teamwork and Individual Competitiveness: your approach to incentive Usually: 1 8 99 oriented towards general benefit < a balance > oriented toward individual advantage Will need: 1 8 99 an environment based on trust < a balance > a means of measuring personal performance To Avoid: 1 8 99 becoming too idealistic < a balance > focusing too much on personal payoff Advantage 6. Preferred Pace for Action: how you direct your energies Usually: 1 86 99 likes to reflect before acting < a balance > takes direct action to get things done Will need: 1 86 99 personal control over scheduling < a balance > a busy schedule To Avoid: 1 86 99 putting things off < a balance > failing to delegate when necessary Activity 7. Demands of Work: your success/challenge orientation Usually: 1 59 99 self-confident, focused on success < a balance > has high expectations of self, others Will need: 1 59 99 a success-oriented environment < a balance > personal challenges To Avoid: 1 59 99 denying responsibility for errors < a balance > expecting too much of self and others Challenge Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 5 of 41
  • 6. Needs GraphThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING 8. Involvement of Feeling: your subjectivity and objectivity Usually: 1 10 99 objective and detached < a balance > sympathetic and warm Will need: 1 10 99 an unemotional environment < a balance > an outlet for subjective issues To Avoid: 1 10 99 discounting peoples feelings < a balance > worrying unnecessarily Empathy 9. Dealing with Change: how you handle variety Usually: 1 81 99 concentrates attentions well < a balance > likes a variety of simultaneous tasks Will need: 1 6 99 adequate notice of any change < a balance > plenty of different calls on attention To Avoid: 1 75 99 failing to accept necessary change < a balance > getting distracted too easily Change 10. Personal Independence: how characteristic you are in outlook Usually: 1 33 99 understands how most people think < a balance > individualistic in outlook Will need: 1 54 99 a predictable environment < a balance > opportunities for individuality To Avoid: 1 54 99 discomfort with unusual ideas < a balance > being different for its own sake Freedom 11. Action or Reflection: how you handle issues in decision-making Usually: 1 6 99 sees issues in terms of black and white < a balance > handles ambiguous situations well Will need: 1 48 99 issues reduced to their simplest form < a balance > plenty of time for complex decisions To Avoid: 1 48 99 being impulsive < a balance > indecision when pressured Thought Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 6 of 41
  • 7. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING STRENGTHS AND NEEDS PAGESThe enclosed "Strengths and Needs" pages consist of twelve pages of individualized descriptionand interpretation of the basic needs. The actual scores for the components are not reported onthese pages.For those of you who are steeped in numbers, let us assure you that there are several advantagesto this approach. First, it eliminates the concern for the relative "goodness" or "poorness" of a givenscore. Secondly, while each page can stand totally by itself in terms of its message, the completeinformation is now easy to understand and comprehend, making it entirely possible to give eachperson constructive, usable feedback.The format of the pages is this: there is a beginning paragraph outlining these strengths (UsualBehavior) associated with the particular style. These statements are very positive, and indicateyour natural, effective behavior. Then, there is a paragraph describing your Basic Needs. Thesestatements are non-judgmental but help you understand that being maximally productive isdependent on having certain basic needs met. Finally, there is a paragraph outlining POTENTIALbehavior in the event that the need is not met. There is nothing absolute about this Stress Behaviordescription, but it can easily be used in developing an "early warning system" in identifying andcoping with stress.Organizationally, these pages can help you accomplish many things. As feedback, they are helpful.They provide a foundation to teambuilding sessions and other relational programs. For supervisorsand managers, the information is invaluable when dealing with individual problems and conflictresolution. They could easily be integrated into any stress management program, or actuallyprovide the basis for such a program. Coupled with the predictive material, they could become anarrative profile of the individual. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 7 of 41
  • 8. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS Your ReportThis Personal Strengths & Needs report describes your behaviors and motivations. No attempt has been madeto measure your talents or abilities. The pages that follow describe information from your Usual, Needs and Stress scores. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 8 of 41
  • 9. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS ESTEEM: ONE-ON-ONE RELATIONSHIPSYour ability to be objective and free of self-conscious feelings is a strength naturally resulting fromyour preference for frank and direct relationships. You find it easy to come to the point withoutbeating around the bush. Strengths: straightforward unevasive matter-of-factNEED: While you appreciate a certain amount of openness and frankness from others, you alsoneed to feel a personal respect from time to time, especially from the significant people in your life.CAUSES OF STRESS: Both too much sentiment and lack of personal concern are likely to causeyou discomfort. Any criticism of you needs to be balanced with genuine praise. Possible stress reactions: undue sensitivity over-directness Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 9 of 41
  • 10. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS ACCEPTANCE: SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPSYour natural friendliness toward others keeps you interested and involved in the activities ofgroups. As a rule, you are accepting of people and are at ease in most social situations. Genuinesocial awareness is one of your real strengths. Strengths: sociable communicative at ease in groupsNEED: However, it is necessary for you to have a reasonable amount of time to spend by yourselfor in the company of one or two other people. A balance of group and private activities is best, asthis allows you to maintain your sense of well-being.CAUSES OF STRESS: Too much time spent on solitary activities can result in feelings of loneliness;but you may also find yourself anxious to relieve the pressure of continuous social or group activities. Possible stress reactions: withdrawal over-eagerness to please the group Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 10 of 41
  • 11. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS STRUCTURE: ORGANIZINGFocusing your attention on methods and procedures, you place great value on policies which havebeen tried and proven. You recognize the importance of attending to detail, being generally carefuland thorough. Strengths: systematic detail-oriented procedure-mindedNEED: Your activities should involve a balance of familiar and predictable situations withopportunities for expression of your initiative. In any case, it is important for you to maintain asense of control.CAUSES OF STRESS: When pushed to change your plan of action, you may experience morepressure than other people. Also, too much attention to details can cause you to lose sight of thebroad objectives. Possible stress reactions: de-emphasis on system over-controlling Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 11 of 41
  • 12. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS AUTHORITY: AUTHORITY RELATIONSHIPSPositions of authority and control have an appeal for you. Without being domineering or overlyaggressive, you have an ability to handle such authority through a combination of assertivenessand pleasant persuasion. Strengths: authoritative, yet pleasant open to discussion self-directiveNEED: From others, you need suggestion and low-key persuasion rather than direct orders.Generally pleasant and agreeable relationships are preferred, with occasional opportunities for youto influence the thinking and actions of others.CAUSES OF STRESS: When friendly disagreement turns to argument or open confrontation, youmay be surprised to find yourself becoming bossy, even domineering, at least in the eyes of others. Possible stress reactions: becoming demanding airing opinions too freely speaking without listening Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 12 of 41
  • 13. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS ADVANTAGE: IDEALISM AND REALISMTrust and loyalty are dominant features of your approach to most situations. Being primarilyidealistic, you tend to focus on long-term and intangible benefits. Strengths: trustful cooperative well-meaningNEED: Similarly, you need an atmosphere of mutual trust. You respond well to people who areloyal and trustworthy, and who place primary emphasis on the benefits of a team-oriented,cooperative approach. Competitive rivalry should be minimized.CAUSES OF STRESS: The dog-eat-dog approach of those who are too openly competitive ororiented toward individual reward can upset your cordial and friendly attitude. Feelings ofdisappointment result, and you become too idealistic, even impractical. Possible stress reactions: gullibility becoming impractical unrealistic attitudes Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 13 of 41
  • 14. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS ACTIVITY: REFLECTION AND ACTIONYou have a valuable asset in your naturally high energy level. You enjoy being active, possibly evenfor long periods of time. This gives you the added benefit of being able to summon reserves ofenergy when your schedule demands it. Strengths: vigorous and persuasive enthusiastic energeticNEED: The stimulus of having many definite things to do and opportunities to be physically activeprovide the best arena in which to exercise your energetic enthusiasm. You respond well tosituations that require immediate and direct action.SOURCES OF STRESS: Extended periods of inactivity are likely to bother you, possibly generatingrestless tension as a result of your pent-up energy. Possible stress reactions: restless tension over-emphasis on action spending energies ineffectually Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 14 of 41
  • 15. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS CHALLENGE: YOUR VIEW OF YOURSELFGenerally, you have the asset of a balanced outlook on yourself and other people - sort of an "ImOK, youre OK" attitude. You recognize that everyone has strengths and weaknesses, and aretherefore able to be neither too critical nor too self- confident. Strengths: accepting but strong-willed balance of confidence and caution enthusiasticNEED: This same balance is comfortable for you in your environment. You will feel most at easeamong people who share your general outlook, and who tend to provide mutual support andencouragement.CAUSES OF STRESS: People who are freely critical of others or who exhibit an excess of self-confidence can trouble or otherwise annoy you. Depending on the circumstances, your reactionmay be either to become oppositional or to become overly self-critical. Possible stress reactions: becoming overly self-critical tendency to worry unnecessarily defensive feelings Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 15 of 41
  • 16. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS EMPATHY: DEALING WITH EMOTIONSYou are primarily objective and practical in your outlook. Your empathy toward others diminishesrapidly when you perceive they are taking no steps to help themselves. You prefer to keep youremotions in check. Strengths: objective practical logicalNEED: You feel most at ease in surroundings that emphasize the practical side of things and havean appeal to logic. You need to be treated by others in a low-key, unemotional manner.CAUSES OF STRESS: It is difficult for you to understand the motivations of people who get carriedaway with emotion. When feelings and emotions seem to be clouding the issue, you are likely torespond by trying to minimize those feelings. Possible stress reactions: insensitivity to feelings overly definite opinions over-concern for the practical Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 16 of 41
  • 17. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS CHANGE: DEALING WITH CHANGENovelty and adventure stimulate you, as you are always alert to start new things. You find it easyto adapt to changes, and will even effect change from time to time to alleviate boredom. Strengths: takes changes in stride responsive and attentive adaptiveNEED: However, your environment must allow you the freedom of choice in order for you to getmaximum benefit from your strengths. You are at your best in surroundings that encourageindividual initiative so that you can determine your own routine.CAUSES OF STRESS: Changes which are unexpectedly forced upon you may cause you to respondadversely. The flexibility which characterizes your strength may become a handicap under theseconditions. Possible stress reactions: difficulty controlling restlessness concentration problems resisting abrupt change Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 17 of 41
  • 18. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS FREEDOM: INDEPENDENCEConsistent and cooperative are characteristics which describe your general nature. With your insightinto how people think and feel, you make a valuable team member, placing a great deal ofimportance on convention and restraint. Strengths: restrained consistent cooperativeNEED: However, there are times when you prefer an approach based on the "personal touch." Youneed opportunities to express this individuality from time to time, as long as you can do so againsta background of order and predictability.CAUSES OF STRESS: Notice that your need implies a balanced situation. You may be prone tofeelings of insecurity when your environment lacks predictability; but inner tensions can mount ifyou are denied some freedom of thought and action. Possible stress reactions: anxiety emphasis on undue restraint Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 18 of 41
  • 19. Strengths and NeedsThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING PERSONAL STRENGTHS AND NEEDS THOUGHT: MAKING DECISIONSCompared to most people, you are matter-of-fact, tending to handle situations decisively and withoutward assurance and confidence. You are able to grasp the relevant issues and form yourjudgments quickly. Strengths: direct and to-the-point decisive matter-of-factNEED: Even though you like to make your decisions rapidly and dispassionately, you also preferto feel that you are not under the pressure of time when doing so. You need time to gather thesignificant information as matters become more complex.CAUSES OF STRESS: Your need for reflective thought is about average. You are therefore likelyto find that on one hand you can be frustrated by ambiguity, and on the other hand realize that youworry unnecessarily from time to time. Possible stress reactions: tendency to over-simplify fear of making mistakes Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 19 of 41
  • 20. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING TM This is your Life Style Grid Report. It tells you the kinds of activities youre interested in, your usual style, your needs, and what is likely to happen to you under stress. In addition, it shows how you compare with other people in these areas. Use this information to help you reach your personal and work goals, increase your productivity and build greater team effectiveness. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 20 of 41
  • 21. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 1: InterestsThe Asterisk is used to describe the activities people prefer. Activities towards the top of the Grid emphasize directinvolvement (with a task or with people). Activities towards the left of the Grid emphasize the task rather than thepeople who do the task. Activities typical of this quadrant Activities typical of this quadrant are: are: • taking action • selling and promoting • seeing a finished product • persuading • solving practical problems • motivating people • working through people • counseling or teaching • directing • working with people Activities typical of this quadrant Activities typical of this quadrant are: are: • scheduling • strategic planning • doing detailed work • dealing with abstraction • keeping close contact • thinking of new approaches • working with numbers • innovating • working with systems • working with ideas TM Activities towards the bottom of the Grid emphasize indirect involvement (with a task or with people). Activities towards the right of the Grid emphasize people rather than the tasks that people do. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 21 of 41
  • 22. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 2: Your InterestsThe kinds of activities you prefer are described by the Asterisk. Your Asterisk is in the RED quadrant, but it is fairlyclose to the middle of the Grid. While you probably like practical activities, you may well combine these with aninterest in activities associated with all quadrants of the Grid. People whose Asterisk lies in this quadrant like persuading or influencing people more than you do. People whose Asterisk lies in this People whose Asterisk lies in this quadrant like monitoring or quadrant like planning or being controlling more than you do. creative more than you do. TM Your RED Asterisk shows that you like to: focus on practical matters have a variety of interests spend time working in different areas have opportunities to work in areas of secondary interest get things done Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 22 of 41
  • 23. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 3: Usual StylesThe Diamond is used to describe peoples Usual Styles. Diamonds towards the top of the Grid describe more outgoing,forceful styles. Diamonds towards the left of the Grid describe more objective and detached styles. Usual Styles in this quadrant: Usual Styles in this quadrant: • friendly • competitive • decisive and energetic • assertive • frank • flexible • logical • enthusiastic about new things Usual Styles in this quadrant: Usual Styles in this quadrant: • orderly • insightful • concentrative • selectively sociable • cautious • thoughtful • insistent • reflective • optimistic TM Diamonds towards the bottom of the Grid describe lower-key styles. Diamonds towards the right of the Grid describe more subjective styles. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 23 of 41
  • 24. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 4: Your Usual StyleThe productive way you set about your tasks is described by the Diamond. Your Diamond is in the RED quadrant,but it also lies fairly close to the Yellow quadrant. When you are working effectively, you are generally logical andsystematic. People whose Diamond lies in this quadrant tend to be more assertive and competitive than you are. People whose Diamond lies in this People whose Diamond lies in this quadrant tend to be more organized quadrant tend to be more and concentrative than you are. thoughtful and insightful than you are. TM Your RED Diamond shows that you are usually: direct but friendly energetic and objective You also tend to be: methodical consistent concentrative Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 24 of 41
  • 25. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 5: NeedsThe Circle describes the kind of support or motivation you need to show your Usual Style. People with the Circletowards the top of the Grid respond best to those who are forceful and outgoing. People with the Circle towardsthe left of the Grid need for others to be detached and objective. People with the Circle in this People with the Circle in this quadrant need for others to: quadrant need for others to: • encourage group interaction • encourage competition • offer clear-cut situations • be assertive • give plenty to do • allow flexibility • be direct and logical • introduce novelty and variety People with the Circle in this People with the Circle in this quadrant need for others to: quadrant need for others to: • encourage an organized • offer individual support approach • encourage expression of • permit concentration on tasks feelings • offer an environment of trust • allow time for reflection • be consistent • give time for difficult decisions TM People with the Circle towards the bottom of the Grid need for others to be low-key in approach. People with the Circle towards the right of the Grid respond well to an environment which encourages a subjective approach. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 25 of 41
  • 26. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 6: Your NeedsThe support you need to develop your Usual Style is described by the Circle. Your Circle is in the RED quadrant, butit also lies fairly close to the Yellow quadrant. To be most effective, you respond best to people who are logical andsystematic. People whose Circle lies in this quadrant need more individual incentive and variety than you do. People whose Circle lies in this People whose Circle lies in this quadrant need a more orderly quadrant need a more individually environment than you do. supportive environment than you do. TM Your RED Circle shows that you are most comfortable when people around you: give you clear-cut decisions to make who are objective and rational in their delegation of tasks to you You also respond well to people who: encourage trust and fairness tell you the rules and then dont interrupt you unnecessarily are democratic rather than assertive Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 26 of 41
  • 27. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 7: Stress BehaviorThe Square describes your Stress Behavior -- your behavior when your needs are not met. People with the Squaretowards the top of the Grid may become too forceful and outspoken under stress. People with the Square towards theleft of the Grid may become detached and analytical under stress. Under stress, people with the Under stress, people with the Square in this quadrant: Square in this quadrant: • find it hard to give individual • are easily distracted support • distrust others • become impatient • become domineering • are "busy" for the sake of it • fail to follow the plan • dismiss others feelings Under stress, people with the Under stress, people with the Square in this quadrant: Square in this quadrant: • become over-insistent on rules • ignore social convention • resist necessary change • become indecisive • are reluctant to confront others • find it hard to act • may be taken in • see the worst possibilities TM People with the Square towards the bottom of the Grid may become withdrawn under stress. People with the Square towards the right of the Grid may become subjective under stress. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 27 of 41
  • 28. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 8: Your Stress BehaviorYour Stress Behavior is described by the Square. Your Square is in the RED quadrant, but it also lies fairly close tothe Yellow quadrant. When people dont deal with you the way your needs suggest, you may become impatientand inflexible. Under stress, people whose Square lies in this quadrant become more domineering and distracted than you do. Under stress, people whose Square Under stress, people whose Square lies in this quadrant become more lies in this quadrant become more resistive to change and inflexible over-sensitive and hesitant than than you do. you do. TM Your RED Square shows that your stress behavior may include your being: busy for the sake of it insensitive You may also become: over-organizing and rigid resistive to change Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 28 of 41
  • 29. Life Style Grid ®This Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDING Page 9: Your Life Style GridThis page provides a summary of the information presented in the preceding pages. The characteristics of your Asterisk,Diamond, Circle and Square are described below. TM (Red): While you enjoy practical activities, you may well combine these with an interest in activities associated with all quadrants of the Grid. (Red): When you are working effectively, you tend to be logical and systematic. (Red): To be most effective, you generally respond best to people who are logical and systematic. Under stress, you may become impatient and inflexible. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 29 of 41
  • 30. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEWDate Printed13 January 2012 30 of 41
  • 31. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGCAREER MANAGEMENT REPORTThe Career Management Report helps to better match your career choices with your personality,the kind of things that motivate you, and your interests.The Career Management Report is organized into three sections, as follows: • Organizational Focus, which will help you determine the work environment that suits you best. • Job Families/Job Titles that offer you the greatest potential for success. • Career Summary, a list of strengths that you bring to the work that you do.Organizational FocusThe Organizational Focus tells you the general work environment in which youre going to feelmost motivated and most comfortable. We generate this information by determining how similaryou are to other people who work in these work environments.Job Families/Job TitlesThe Job Families/Job Titles tell you how closely you match employees in 22 job families (and in alarge number of individual jobs). Most of the Job Titles that you match will have a direct link to theU.S. Department of Labors online Occupational Outlook Handbook so you can find out moreinformation about pay, conditions, and job prospects. International users may wish to choose the JobFamilies Only option, since the U.S. data may not be useful to them.Career SummaryThe Career Summary is an overview of the strengths you will probably bring to the work you do.These strengths are extracted from the Organizational Focus and Job Families/Job Titles sections.Your career decisions should be based on many factors, including your experience, your education,your preferences, even the way you approach the interview process. We believe that the CareerManagement Report will provide useful information in many of these areas. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 31 of 41
  • 32. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGORGANIZATIONAL FOCUS - INDIVIDUALThe Organizational Focus shows you the best working environment for you. Its generated bydetermining how similar you are to people who work in four different work environments. ORGANIZATIONAL FOCUS for : WILLIAM G. BEW Similarity to others in this job arena: Intensity Intensity Green - Sales/Marketing Blue - Design/Strategy Yellow - Admin/Fiscal Red - Operations/Technology Description of Organizational Focus (by color): Red - Operations/Technology Green - Sales/Marketing • A work environment that emphasizes a • A work environment that emphasizes practical, hands-on approach, usually with a selling, promoting, directing, and motivating tactical focus. others. • A product-focused culture with strong • A communications-based culture designed emphasis on implementation. to influence others. Yellow - Admin/Fiscal Blue - Design/Strategy • A work environment that emphasizes • A work environment that emphasizes standards, tracking, and quality assurance. planning, innovating, and creating. • A culture based on efficient procedures and • A culture of ideas, usually with a strong policies. strategic focus. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 32 of 41
  • 33. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGRather than represent you in terms of your strongest Organizational Focus, we use all four. The color barsthat describe your Focus may be of varying lengths: all long, all short, or a mixture.The bottom color of the four is always the longest. The longer the bar, the more you are likely to identifywith the work environment represented by that color. Intensity Intensity Less similar to individuals in these colors Complements the Bottom-Line color Bottom-Line colorThe second longest bar is your supporting color. Its less significant for you than your bottom-line color, butit will give you additional information about the work environment that fits you best.The two remaining bars represent work environments which are likely to be less attractive for you, andwhere you are less likely to "fit". Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 33 of 41
  • 34. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGJOB FAMILIES / JOB TITLES Similarity to others in this Job The Job Titles you most closely ◀ Least Similar Most Similar ▶ Family matched within each Job FamilyEngineering & Architecture Environmental Engineers Computer Hardware EngineersApplying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and other Civil Engineersscientific disciplines into the planning, designing, and overseeing of physicalsystems and processes. Duties may include creating, testing, developing, Architectsand maintaining tools, machines, electrical equipment, buildings/structures, Mechanical Engineering Techniciansor other physical entities.Computer & Mathematical Science Computer Software Engineers (Applications)Designing, developing, and maintaining databases, software, hardware, Network & Computer Systemsnetworks, and other information/logic systems. Duties may include Administratorscollecting/organizing data, computer programming, providing technical Computer Systems Engineers/support, web design, and configuring communication systems, among other Architectsdata-driven functions. Computer & Information Scientists (Research) Computer Support SpecialistsPersonal Care & Service Child Care Workers & Home/ Personal Care AidesProviding personal assistance, care, and services to individuals in various Hairstylists, Manicurists, & Funeralcontexts. Duties may include attending to children, caring for the elderly or Workersdisabled, coordinating tourist travel, ensuring safety and comfort totravelers, providing cosmetic services, coordinating recreational activities forresidential facilities, as well as other personal care and service tasks.Healthcare Practitioner & Technical Registered Nurses PhysiciansProviding medical care and treatment in an effort to achieve optimal mental Medical Technologists &and physical patient well-being. Duties may include assessing patient health, Techniciansdiagnosing illnesses, performing surgery, prescribing medication,implementing prevention strategies, conducting/reviewing laboratorydiagnostics, and supervising medical support staff. Most of theseoccupations require a graduate education.Construction & Extraction Construction Managers Supervisors Of Construction &Performing hands-on work functions related to the building of structures or Extraction Workersthe removal of materials from natural settings for use in construction or Electriciansother applications. Duties may include bricklaying, carpentry, masonry,roofing, plumbing, inspecting integrity of structures according to building Carpenterscodes, mining, drilling, and disposal of construction by-products, usingspecialized tools and equipment. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 34 of 41
  • 35. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGJOB FAMILIES / JOB TITLES Similarity to others in this Job The Job Titles you most closely ◀ Least Similar Most Similar ▶ Family matched within each Job FamilyFood Preparation & Serving-Related Waiters & Waitresses Food Service ManagersPreparing and cooking foods and/or serving patrons in dining Chefs & Head Cooksestablishments or other settings. Duties may include checking food quality,mixing drinks/ingredients, cleaning dishware, taking orders, planningmenus, and other food/serving-related functions.Installation, Maintenance, & Repair Supervisors Of Mechanics, Installers, & RepairersPerforming hands-on work functions related to the installation, Automated Teller & Office Machinemaintenance, and repair of various machinery, systems, vehicles, and other Repairersserviceable equipment. Duties may include diagnosing, adjusting, servicing, Telecommunications Equipmentand overhauling engines, telecommunications and/or security systems, Installers & Repairersheating, vacuuming, and air-conditioning units, and electronics. Transportation Mechanics & Technicians Electrical & Electronics RepairersTransportation & Material Moving Truck, Bus, & Ambulance Drivers Supervisors Of Vehicle OperatorsPiloting, driving, operating, or navigating transport vehicles or material Supervisors Of Freight, Stock, &moving machinery (e.g., aircrafts, automobiles, water vessels, construction Material Handlerscranes, locomotives, tractors). Duties include flying commercial airplanes,directing air traffic, driving public or school buses, taxis, trucks, ambulances,commanding motor-driven boats, inspecting freight and cargo, conductingtrains, operating forklifts, among other transportation and material movingtasks.Building/Grounds Cleaning & Supervisors Of Maids, Janitors, &Maintenance Groundskeepers Maids, Janitors, & GroundskeepersCleaning and maintaining hotels, hospitals, offices, and otherestablishments, as well as landscapes. Duties may include groundskeeping,planting trees, watering plants, housekeeping, washing windows,vacuuming, exterminating pests, among other cleaning and maintenancetasks.Production Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, & WeighersProducing, creating, and/or manufacturing a variety of products (e.g., food, Industrial Production Managerslumber, electrical equipment, fabrics, metals, plastics, stones, fuel) through Assemblers, Fitters, Finishers, &the operating of specialized tools and/or equipment. Duties may include Calibratorsbaking pastries, binding books, cutting, shaping, and assembling furniture,assembling electronics, shaping molten glass, fabricating jewelry, welding Supervisors Of Production &metal components, among other specific production tasks. Operating Workers Packaging & Filling Machine Operators & Tenders Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 35 of 41
  • 36. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGJOB FAMILIES / JOB TITLES Similarity to others in this Job The Job Titles you most closely ◀ Least Similar Most Similar ▶ Family matched within each Job FamilyHealthcare Support Nursing Aides, Orderlies, & AttendantsProviding support functions in the healthcare field. Duties may include Medical Assistants &assisting physicians with patient care and treatment, rehabilitation, record Transcriptionistskeeping, transcription, and other routine medical functions.Life, Physical, & Social Science Medical Scientists & EpidemiologistsApplying scientific knowledge and expertise to specific life, physical, or Biochemists & Biophysicistssocial science domains. Duties may include researching, collecting/analyzing Biological & Agriculturalqualitative and quantitative data, conducting experimental studies, devising Techniciansmethods to apply laws and theories to industry and other fields (e.g., mentalhealth, agriculture, chemistry, meteorology, plant and animal life, human Microbiologistsbehavior and culture). Environmental & Geological ScientistsArts, Design, Sports, Media, & Graphic DesignersEntertainment Editors Public Relations SpecialistsCreating and/or expressing ideas or demonstrating talents through variousmedia for entertainment, informational, or instructional purposes. Duties Fashion Designersmay include acting, dancing, singing, designing graphics, operating media Audio & Video Production/equipment, translating text, writing literature, producing/directing movies Broadcast Techniciansor plays, public speaking, radio announcing, competing in sporting events,news reporting, among other specific functions within the media.Protective Service Security, Police, & Fire Fighting Enforcement ManagersServing and protecting the best interests of the community, environment, Supervisors Of Police, Fire Fighting,and/or individuals, adhering to federal, state, and local laws. Duties may & Correctional Officersinclude investigating criminal cases, regulating traffic and crowds, fire Police & Sheriff Patrol Officersfighting, ticketing/arresting perpetrators, inspecting baggage or cargo,responding to emergency situations, patrolling designated areas, guardingestablishments, and providing other security measures.Sales & Related Purchasing Managers Sales EngineersSelling goods or services to a wide range of customers across various Real Estate Brokersindustries. Duties may include selling retail, appliances, furniture, autoparts, medical services, insurance, real estate, financial or consultingservices, securities and commodities, as well as other products/services. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 36 of 41
  • 37. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGJOB FAMILIES / JOB TITLES Similarity to others in this Job The Job Titles you most closely ◀ Least Similar Most Similar ▶ Family matched within each Job FamilyManagement Construction Managers Engineering ManagersPlanning, directing, and coordinating high-level activities within an Purchasing Managersorganization. Duties may include managing personnel, creating budgets,developing and implementing strategies, creating organizational policies, Chief Operating Officersand supervising company operations. These managerial functions are Industrial Production Managerssimilar in nature across various industries and fields (e.g. engineering, sales,human resources, medical).Office & Administrative Support Secretaries (Except Legal, Medical, & Executive)Providing clerical support within an organization. Duties may include Billing & Posting Clerks & Machinepreparing statements, tracking accounts, record keeping, bill collecting, Operatorsmaking phone calls, scheduling appointments, entering data, providing Executive Secretariescustomer service, ordering and tracking inventory, handling monetarytransactions, among other administrative support tasks.Legal Corporate Lawyers (Consensual Outcomes)Researching, litigating, and documenting matters relating to the law, Paralegals & Legal Assistantsspecializing in litigation, arbitration, transcription, investigation, or Litigation Lawyers (Win-Losenegotiation of legal issues. Duties may include representing clients in legal Outcomes)proceedings, examining legal statutes, documenting agreements, draftingcontracts, investigating cases, and transcribing hearings.Business & Finance Purchasing Agents (Except Wholesale & Retail)Analyzing and evaluating business/financial information for the purposes of Functional Training & Developmentdocumenting, making recommendations and/or ensuring adherence to Specialistsbusiness protocol. Duties may include preparing financial reports, Insurance Underwritersdeveloping investment strategies, analyzing general business trends, orassessing risk/liability, to streamline the operations of an organization. Compensation, Benefits, & Job Analysis Specialists Claims Adjusters, Examiners, & InvestigatorsCommunity & Social Services Directors (Religious Activities & Education)Counseling, rehabilitating, and/or supporting social and psychological Clergymatters of individuals, groups, or communities. Duties may include helping Counselors & Therapistsindividuals maximize their mental and emotional well-being, cope withaddictions, and lead healthy lifestyles, as well as providing spiritual, moral,or vocational guidance. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 37 of 41
  • 38. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGJOB FAMILIES / JOB TITLES Similarity to others in this Job The Job Titles you most closely ◀ Least Similar Most Similar ▶ Family matched within each Job FamilyEducation, Training, & Library Librarians Business Teachers (Postsecondary)Teaching/training individuals or groups of people academic, social, or other Education Administratorsformative skills using various techniques/methods. Duties may include (Elementary & Secondary)instructing children, adolescents, adults, individuals with special needs, orother specific samples within a formal or informal setting, creatinginstructional materials and educational content, and providing necessarylearning resources.Farming, Fishing, & ForestryPerforming various outdoor activities related to agriculture, horticulture,aquaculture, and/or forestry. Duties may include attending to live farm,ranch, or aquacultural animals, planting, cultivating, and harvesting crops,hunting and trapping wild animals, developing, maintaining, or protectingforested areas and woodlands, and/or cutting, sorting, and grading trees formultiple uses. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 38 of 41
  • 39. Career ManagementThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGCAREER SUMMARYYour Organizational Focus CharacteristicsGreen - Communicating* various functions that allow for interaction with stakeholders* high levels of energy and enthusiasm are encouragedBlue - Planning* functions that include brainstorming and development* emphasis on strategy and the creation of production conceptsYellow - Administrating* functions that provide direct measurables to work output and performance* general procedural standards following carefully defined office systems and procedures* predictable and stable work setting that follows consistent approach to work objectives* decisions and actions are a function of using data for thorough analysisRed - Expediting* urgency and action are stressed in the scope of projects* tangible results are obtained and operational procedures are emphasized* challenges are addressed using practical problem solving* information is conveyed through the use of technical facts targeted at work flow* direct instruction and management to clearly understand work goals and expectationsYour Top Job Strengths based on Job Families/Job TitlesEngineering & ArchitectureMechanical Engineers, Electrical Engineers, Electronics Engineers (Except Computer), Aerospace Engineers,Chemical EngineersComputer & Mathematical ScienceComputer Software Engineers (Applications), Computer Systems Analysts, Technology Project Managers,Computer Support Specialists, Computer ProgrammersPersonal Care & ServiceHairstylists, Manicurists, & Funeral Workers, Child Care Workers & Home/Personal Care AidesHealthcare Practitioner & TechnicalRegistered Nurses, Pharmacists, Child, Family, & School Social Workers, Physicians,Medical Technologists & TechniciansConstruction & ExtractionSupervisors Of Construction & Extraction Workers, Carpenters, Electricians, Construction Managers Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 39 of 41
  • 40. CoachingThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGWILLIAM G. BEW: In working with others, socially responsive, he prefers casual relationships. When giving or accepting direction, he prefers self-determination and autonomy. As to competitiveness and stamina, he is team- and service-oriented; he is objective and emotionally detached and competitive. Enthusiastic and energetic, he has a high work capacity. When organizing or planning, he questions everything. He wont blindly follow instructions unless the wisdom of doing so is obvious;Suggestions for coaching WILLIAM G. BEW: Avoid assignments that involve prolonged solitude; focus on team-oriented goal. Acceptance Keep relationships pleasant and agreeable; minimize confrontational situations. Authority* Activities should involve work which is useful or of service to others, not just `busy work. Advantage Keep relationships unemotional and strictly business at all times. Empathy Provide a busy schedule with minimum delays. Activity* Freely explain the reasoning in making changes. Change * Particularly significant; may impact other areas Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 40 of 41
  • 41. Preferred Work StylesThis Report Was Prepared ForWILLIAM G. BEW G3TPZ8TEAMBUILDINGScale 0 5 10 Scale 0 5 10Knowledge Specialist 3 Public Contact 5Directive Management 10 Detail 6Delegative Management 2 Global 8Work Motivation 5 Linear 3Self Development 8 Conceptual 2Corporate Adaptability 8 Concrete 9Social Adaptability 9Social Responsibility 5The following are descriptions of typical behaviors of High Scores (7-10).Knowledge Specialist: Contributes and leads by Social Adaptability: Adaptability to people, socialutilizing personal expertise and knowledge to find situations, corporate and legal rules. Positive attitudessolutions. Leads by example. This includes managers toward others, ability to withstand extended stress.and executives who are leaders in technical, educational, Meets unexpected changes in an optimistic, tolerantconsulting and other specialized fields. manner, extends trust to others easily.Directive Management: Personal, direct involvement in Social Responsibility: Values and supports socialproblem solving, controlling and implementing. Leads conventions in own social group. Provides and supportsfrom the front in exercising authority. Includes managers stability in work, family, legal and social relationships.and executives in action-driven organizations. Each pair below has a combined score of 11.Delegative Management: Utilizes plans and strategies.Arranges resources and assists co-workers and teams in Public Contact: Prefers activities involving socialdealing with resource and implementation issues. contact. Seeks solutions through people. Focused onIncludes managers and executives in plan-driven people being central to organizational effectiveness.organizations. Detail: Concern for the procedural and detailed aspectsWork Motivation: A positive attitude toward work; of work. Focused on processes as central toexhibits a responsible outlook toward work rules and organizational effectiveness.assigned functions. Able to find value in most jobs/roles.Self Development: A positive attitude toward personal Global: Problem solving that involves a relational andgrowth and development; utilizes classic educational holistic process. Thinking and actions need not follow asystems more than hands-on experience. Motivated to set, sequential pattern.make contributions and exercise professional or Linear: Preference for activities and tasks that follow amanagerial responsibility. logical, sequential analysis and process.Corporate Adaptability: A positive commitment torelationships and organizational goals necessary for Conceptual: Utilizes abstract information, experience,advancing in the organization and corporate structure/ intuition and knowledge to find fresh and imaginativeculture. Dedicated to and identifies with the corporate solutions.initiatives that require significant individual and team Concrete: Uses analysis and facts to solve problems.commitment. Emphasis is on concrete, immediate, visible results. Copyright © 2011, Birkman International, Inc. Houston, Texas. All rights reserved. 41 of 41

×