Corporate Water Stewardship and Collective Action: The Water Action Hub
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Corporate Water Stewardship and Collective Action: The Water Action Hub

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  • So once you register. You will be able to view the different pages of the Hub. The home page offers the user the opportunity to access the information through 4 entry points or categories of information listed on the Hub: Organizations Projects River Basins And Action Areas Note the Organization and Project links would take you to information entered by Hub users who have created what we call “profiles” of their “organizations” and/or their “projects” in different river basins, and we will look at those later. On the other hand, the River Basin and Action Areas are entered by the Administrator, and the User contributes to the content of those pages but not necessarily their build up. It is worth noting here, that at this stage, we, as the Administrator, have entered on 3 river basins so far: the Colorado, the Orange-Senqu and the Wami-Ruvu as the first pilot hubs we are targeting through the Hub. You can also view the projects listed on the Hub through a global map, which we are working on developing. Eventually, when the Hub gets more populated with projects, the map will show a cluster of dots spread across the different geographies of the world. Also on the Home page is a dynamic latest update list on the top right corner, where you can monitor and follow the recent organizations who joined the Hub, or the projects they might have added, or Basins that have been created etc.
  • Finally for the Action Areas, we believe the ones listed here cover the main areas of water management. If your project doesn’t fit under any, or your organization is interested in other areas not listed here, you can always suggest new action areas to this list.
  • Let’s take a look at one action area for instance “Improved water governance and policy development”. The overview clarifies to the user what is covered under this area of interest to enable better alignment of project activities or organizations’ interests. You can see here that we’re listing the river basins, organizations or projects that have reported interest in a specific action area. You can click on each one to take you to their direct profile as well.
  • to this page where an organization would list its overall activities or focus on water issues. They can also highlight the main action areas they are interested in working on at a global level, as well as the basins where they have operations or in which they area interested. The page also lists all the projects that this organization has entered to the Hub, and additional information including their contact information, which can be left private or open to the public depending on the organization’s preference. One of the additional features that will be added to this page is the ability to contact this organization through an internal messaging system, where users can contact each other through the Hub.
  • So let’s look at a project profile. Similar to an organization, users can enter an overview of their project and highlight its main outcomes. They are also asked to highlight which action areas this project fits under, and the project partners. If a project is looking for partners, users can also highlight that and it will show on the project page. The location is also entered when the project is information is entered. You can also see which basin this project is in, and the project contact (private or public) in the Quick Info box.
  • Now we move to the river basins. As I mentioned earlier the Hub is currently hosting the 3 basins listed here: Colorado, Orange-Senqu, and Wami Ruvu. Additional basins will continue to be added. One way we’re thinking of deciding on adding new basins, is by tracking the level of interest in specific basins from the Hub users, and then adding the basins showing highest interest for instance. So let’s have a look at one of the basins.
  • A river basin profile is intended to give you an overview of the basin which is what we’re seeing here. As well access to listing of basin authorities covering regional, transboundary or national agencies , key planning documents the development agencies involved in the basin with an overview of their programs The knowledge portals provide access to online information databases that are specific to the basin And risk assessment tools list various tools that help analyze or report risk levels in the basin The lists of resources that we will check in a bit, can grow through user input by providing additional resources that are not on the Hub yet. For the overview page, as you see one of the centerpieces is the project map, which would visually display the location of the various projects entered by users under this Basin. We’ve highlighted the basin map and the key river for ease of reference. Note that users are encouraged to enter projects that do not necessarily fall within the boundaries of the basin, such as having projects in northern botswana that are not under the Orange-Senqu. We will still show this on this map. Also on the overview page is a display of the perceived challenges that users have reported in their organization profiles, as well as the action areas they have expressed interest in. The Quick Info box offers generic background material on the basin. The Basin News is a pretty useful box up there to keep an eye on. It is coming soon in collaboration with project supporter Reed Elsevier. It will give registered users access to comprehensive information relating to water-related issues in the geography of interest; And will filter thousands of information sources, both open source and restricted, so that users can easily find the information they need; It will also provide access to abstracts of water-related academic papers (though the full articles must remain behind a pay wall)
  • A river basin profile is intended to give you an overview of the basin which is what we’re seeing here. As well access to listing of basin authorities covering regional, transboundary or national agencies , key planning documents the development agencies involved in the basin with an overview of their programs The knowledge portals provide access to online information databases that are specific to the basin And risk assessment tools list various tools that help analyze or report risk levels in the basin The lists of resources that we will check in a bit, can grow through user input by providing additional resources that are not on the Hub yet. For the overview page, as you see one of the centerpieces is the project map, which would visually display the location of the various projects entered by users under this Basin. We’ve highlighted the basin map and the key river for ease of reference. Note that users are encouraged to enter projects that do not necessarily fall within the boundaries of the basin, such as having projects in northern botswana that are not under the Orange-Senqu. We will still show this on this map. Also on the overview page is a display of the perceived challenges that users have reported in their organization profiles, as well as the action areas they have expressed interest in. The Quick Info box offers generic background material on the basin. The Basin News is a pretty useful box up there to keep an eye on. It is coming soon in collaboration with project supporter Reed Elsevier. It will give registered users access to comprehensive information relating to water-related issues in the geography of interest; And will filter thousands of information sources, both open source and restricted, so that users can easily find the information they need; It will also provide access to abstracts of water-related academic papers (though the full articles must remain behind a pay wall)
  • So this is a quick look at the Basin Authorities. covering regional, transboundary or national agencies ,
  • Basin planning documents, which are external links to the actual documents or to a compilation of planning documents hosted on one webpage
  • Let’s take a look at one action area for instance “Improved water governance and policy development”. The overview clarifies to the user what is covered under this area of interest to enable better alignment of project activities or organizations’ interests. You can see here that we’re listing the river basins, organizations or projects that have reported interest in a specific action area. You can click on each one to take you to their direct profile as well.

Corporate Water Stewardship and Collective Action: The Water Action Hub Corporate Water Stewardship and Collective Action: The Water Action Hub Presentation Transcript

  • Corporate Water Stewardship and Collective Action: The Water Action Hub Presented by Josefina Maestu, Special Advisor UN CEO Water Mandate
  • CEO Water Mandate Overview• Public-private initiative – launched by the UN Secretary-General in 2007• Implemented by the UN Global Compact, in partnership with the Pacific Institute• Multi-stakeholder: companies, civil society, UN, Governments• Strategic framework for Corporate Water Sustainability• Call-to-Action by CEOs to business leaders everywhere
  • Direct Operations: water-use assessments; targets for conservation and waste-water, etc. Supply Chain and Watershed Management:supplier sustainability strategies; assess and respond to watershed risk, etc. Collective Action: civil society, governments, UN, other water initiatives, etc. Public Policy: inputs to public-policy making; advocacy on water sustainability, etc. Community Engagement: support local groups; water education; infrastructure, etc. Transparency: report on implementation and progress
  • Sectors RepresentedApparel Agri-Business BeverageChemicals Construction Consumer ProductsCosmetics Energy EngineeringFinance Food FootwearForest Products Pharma PublishingMining-Metals Water Services Water Utilities
  • Priority Work Areas•Public Policy Engagement  Collective Action•Water and Human Rights•Corporate Water Disclosure
  • The Water Action Hub
  • What is the Water Action Hub? An online information platform that enables organizations to: •Identify and engage with partners to address water risk collective actions in regions of mutual strategic interest •Meet their broader water related objectives •Access organized information to understand the options for collective action Work on the Water Action Hub is made possible by support from IBLF, Deloitte , GIZ, The Coca-Cola Company, SABMiller, Reed Elsevier, Veolia Water North * America, UNEP, and the members of the Advisory Committee As used here, “Deloitte” means Deloitte Consulting LLP, a subsidiary of Deloitte LLP. * Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. -8-
  • -9-
  • Introducing the Water Action HubAction Areas - 10 -
  • Introducing the Water Action Hub- 11 -
  • Introducing the Water Action HubOrganization Profile ExampleCitizens for Dixie’s Future Profile - 12 -
  • Introducing the Water Action HubProject Profile ExampleWoolworths South Africa Farming for the Future Programme - 13 -
  • Introducing the Water Action HubSearch by River Basin - 14 -
  • Introducing the Water Action Hub- 15 -
  • Introducing the Water Action Hub- 16 -
  • Introducing the Water Action Hub- 17 -
  • Introducing the Water Action Hub- 18 -
  • Introducing the Water Action HubIntegration with Other Tools - Risk Assessment ToolsWWF - DEG Water Risk Filter and WRI Aqueduct Tool - 19 -
  • Guide to Water-Related Collective Action October 17th, 2012 Presenter: Jason Morrison, Pacific Institute
  • Guide to Water-Related Collective Action | 21
  • Guide to Water-Related Collective Action | 22 Scope and Purpose• Companies New to External Engagement• Internal Scoping of Needs/Options • water challenges action areas • interested parties • engagement options• Solid Footing for External Discussions
  • Guide to Water-Related Collective Action | 23Collective Action Preparation and Implementation ELEMENT 1: ELEMENT 2: Articulating Water-Related Characterizing the Interested Challenges and Action Areas Party Landscape (Section 4.1) (Section 4.2) ELEMENT 3: Selecting a Collective Action Level of Engagement (Section 4.3) ELEMENT 4: Preparing for Collective Action (Section 4.4) ELEMENT 5: Implementation, Refinement and Evolution (Section 5)
  • Guide to Water-Related Collective Action | 24 Characterizing Water-Related Challenges, Causes, and Risks Drivers of Water Water-Related CompanyWater Resource Management Challenges Interests State System Infrastructure Water Over- Economic Management Allocation Physical Risk Development and Funding Changes to Insufficient Water Direct quality, response to Supply/Sanitation operational quantity, or water Unreliable/ impacts or Water Demographic availability; management Unavailable concerned Governance and Regulatory Risk Shifts alterations to pressures community Regulation goals or and actors or Water Quality objectives requirements customers Deterioration Water Planning, Climate Reputational Management, Variability Flood Damage Risk and Pricing Ecosystem Social Norms Stewardship Degradation and Opportunity Expectations
  • Guide to Water-Related Collective Action | 25 Potential Collective Action Areas from the Water Action Hubn• Efficient Water Use • Climate Change Adaptation and• Effluent Management, Resilience Wastewater Reclamation, Reuse • Ecosystem, Source Water• Community-Level Access to Safe Protection, Restoration Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene • Monitoring and Knowledge• Storm Water Management and Sharing Flood Control • Engaging in Participatory• Infrastructure Finance, Platforms Development, Operation, or • Public Awareness and Education Maintenance • Improved Water Governance,• Sustainable Agriculture Policy Development, and Implementation
  • Guide to Water-Related Collective Action | 26 Connecting Actions to Underlying Causes Water Water Water Flood Ecosystem Over-Allocation Supply Quality Damage Degradation Unreliable Deterioration Efficient Water Use Efficient Water Use Effluent Management/ Effluent Management/ Wastewater WastewaterInadequate Reclamation/Reuse Reclamation/ReuseInfrastructure Community Level Access to Safe Water, Storm Water ManagementSystem Community Level Access to Safe Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Storm Water Management and Flood Control Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) and Flood Control Infrastructure Finance, Development, Operation, or Maintenance Infrastructure Finance, Development, Operation, or Maintenance Sustainable Agriculture Sustainable AgricultureIneffective Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience Climate Change Adaptation and ResilienceWaterManagement Ecosystem/Source Water Protection/Restoration Ecosystem/Source Water Protection/Restoration Monitoring and Knowledge Sharing Monitoring and Knowledge Sharing Engaging in Participatory Platforms Engaging in Participatory PlatformsPoorCatchment Public Awareness and Education Public Awareness and EducationGovernance Improved Water Governance and Policy Development Improved Water Governance and Policy Development
  • http://ceowatermandate.org/resources/mandate-research-and-guidance /