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Recap on 'Setting the Scene' by Josefina Maestu, director of UNW-DPAC, at 2014 UN-Water Annual International Zaragoza Conference. Preparing for World Water Day 2014: Partnerships for improving water …

Recap on 'Setting the Scene' by Josefina Maestu, director of UNW-DPAC, at 2014 UN-Water Annual International Zaragoza Conference. Preparing for World Water Day 2014: Partnerships for improving water and energy access, efficiency and sustainability. 13-16 January 2014

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  • The Ebro Riverbasin, theolderriverbasinauthority in theworld stands up as anexample of longterm PPP thatallowedtoconvert a semi-aridterritoryintoanagrofood and energyspecialisedregion.Water planning in Spainis a processtoagreeuponwatermanagement and tobuild up effectivepartnershipstomanagewater and energy.International cooperationis a meanstofosterthedevlopment of partnership in ordertoadvancetowardstheMilleniumDevelopmentGoals.Spain has set precise target of energywithinwaterplansincludingthedevelopment of reversible hydropowerto back up renewableelectricitysources (such as wind and solar ones), to complete on-goingprojescts and tocontinuehydropowerdevelopment, Copingwithwaterscarcityrequiresinnovativesollutions. Wecannotcontinuedoingthesame . Spainisexploringthewaytointegrate new practicalsollutionsintothewaterplanningprocess.
  • To address the water-energy nexus challenge, governments would benefit from implementing policies that enable coherence between these two commodities. By contrast, incoherent policies might find themselves with severe scarcity of one resource of the other – or both.Options to increase water security often energy-intensive. This includes vastly increased energy requirements of water supply augmentation strategies – like long haul transfers and desalination. In addition, water efficiency improvements are in some cases made at the expense of energy efficiency. For example, efforts to reduce water consumption at power plants are accompanied by the tradeoff of increase costs and lower power efficiency, also resulting in higher GHG emissions.In the same vein, as highlighted in the previous slides, water is a critical aspect of meeting future energy demands – and meeting climate goals.“Water-blind” energy policies, could include re electricity and fuel standards that favor water-intensive options (steam based Concentrating solar power, biofuels from irrigated crops)“Energy-blind” water policies – for instance using energy-intensive options to augment supply (rather than reduce demand). For instance California uses 6% of all its electrictiry consumption just for domestic and irrigation water pumping (Klein, et al 2005). Much of its is to pump water nearly 1000 m over the Tehachapi Mountains from the San Joaquin Valley to Southern Cal, and the pumnps that move this water are the single largest power load in the state.
  • Exploiting win-winsPursuing multiple policy objectives at the same time Examples: increasing water and energy efficiency; lowering water consumption through conservation, labelling of water-efficient appliances, etc. (Singapore)Avoiding conflictsPursuing one policy objective without undermining othersExamples: Requiring solar hot water systems on new buildings (Israel); us of waste heat form thermoelectric power plants for desalinate seawater to produce reliable drinking water (Middle East)Managing trade-offsMinimising negative impacts on other policiesExamples: Recycling effluent from biorefineries to reduce negative impacts on freshwater ecosystems (Brazil); Co-ordination between policies for water allocation and energy explicitly (Israel’s 2010 Master Plan for national water and wastewater management).Can include details of the examples from pg 47 w-e coherence
  • OECD work on water governance (2011) shed light on many obstacles to effective coordination between water and energy policies, such as the lack of institutional incentives and platforms to manage trade-offs, interference of lobbies, absence of strategic planning and sequencing decisions, and intensive competition between the different ministries and public agencies. We are currently starting a project on stakeholder engagement for effective water governance (to be released in 1 year) to review trends, drivers and practices in engaging stakeholder across OECD countries’ water sector and provide policy guidance.

Transcript

  • 1. Josefina Maestu United Nations Office to Support the International Decade for Action: “Water for Life” 2005-2015, UN-Water Decade Programme on Advocacy and Communication) Recap on setting the scene
  • 2. Insights from the inauguration  The Ebro River basin, an example of long term PPP that allowed to convert a semiarid territory into an agro food and energy specialized region.  Water planning in Spain is a process to manage water and energy.  International cooperation can foster partnership to advance the Millennium Development Goals.   Spain has set precise target of energy within water plans including  the development of reversible hydropower to back up renewable electricity sources (such as wind and solar ones),  to complete on-going projects and  to continue hydropower development, Coping with water scarcity requires innovative solutions. Spain is exploring the way to integrate new practical solutions into the water planning process.
  • 3. Pursuing policy objectives independently often leads to “water-blind” energy policies, And “energy-blind” water policies
  • 4. The advantages of policy coherence Take advantage of win-wins • Pursuing multiple policy objectives at the same time Examples: increasing water and energy efficiency; lowering water consumption through conservation, labelling of water-efficient appliances, etc. (Singapore) Managing social conflicts • Pursuing one policy objective without undermining others Examples: Requiring solar hot water systems on new buildings (Israel); use of waste heat from thermoelectric power plants to desalinate seawater to produce reliable drinking water (Middle East) Managing trade-offs • Minimising negative impacts on other policies Examples: Recycling effluent from bio refineries to reduce negative impacts on freshwater ecosystems (Brazil); Co-ordination between policies for water allocation and energy explicitly (Israel).
  • 5. There are many solutions to • • • • • • • Use energy more efficiently (and save water). Use water more efficiently (and save energy). Make water more energy efficient. Make energy more water efficient. Joint production of water and energy Develop new water sources (recirculated and recycled water) and renewable energy (geothermal, wind, solar). Improve the water and the energy mix “Win-win” technological options for both water and energy •E.g. low-flow fixtures, energy efficient appliances But Trade-offs between water and energy are more common •E.g. irrigated biofuels, groundwater overexploitation/pumping
  • 6. W&E Nexus is context dependent They depend on resource endowments and development: There are still significant untapped hydropower development opportunities in countries in which electricity demand is expected to growth faster (e.g. Africa), but this is not general (Asia)
  • 7. Policy coherence needs to recognize that there are multiple objectives • Create business opportunities. All the opportunities FOR winwin solutions (the save water and energy at the same time) but they are not panaceas. They might not necessarily be coherent with many other socially relevant objectives • Improve Justice and fairness • Legitimacy and political acceptance. • Enhance resilience and adaptability to Climate Change • Improve competitiveness. • Being implementable within the institutional set-up. • Cost effectiveness. • Job creation • Strengthen regional development……………….
  • 8. And obstacles to respond to the W&E Challenge – Governance • Existing incentives are still designed to deal with water and energy separately. • Both water and energy investment and planning are mostly based upon existing rather that on future resources. • There is still mutual ignorance of each other sector in the water and energy community. • Too little advance so far in linked information and integrated decision support systems for integrated water and energy management. • Both sector still rely on engineered solutions while natural green infrastructures are underappreciated. • Each community see each other challenges in a self interested way (e.g. water issues as a barrier to energy development but not as a whole sustainable development issue). • ……………..
  • 9. The big brother issue… to what extend are asymmetries between the water and energy sectors an impediment to build effective and fair partnerships • Big global and influential business vs “small, scattered and mostly ignored utilities”. • Innovative and dynamic enterprises vs traditional business. • Well defined concepts and precise information vs debatable definitions , modelling and weak data. • Market driven business decisions vs heavily regulated and publicly financed sector.
  • 10. Need to improve Many institutional preconditions seem to be missed and need to be built to allow for effective partnerships… • Institutional incentives • Platforms/ governance mechanisms to manage trade-offs • Adequate control of lobbies’ pressures • Strategic planning and sequencing decisions • Common information and resources among institutions. • Moving beyond simple modeling
  • 11. Overview of the day Tuesday, January 14, 2014 • 10:00-13.00 World Bank Session: The Business Case for Integrated Energy-Water Planning and Investments • 12:50-13:20 Side Event 1 World Water Day 2014 Teaser: UNU and UNIDO. • 14:30–18:00 UNIDO and UNEP Session: Industry partnerships to ensure water and energy efficiency and sustainability - 14:30-16:00 Panel 1 UNIDO-Industry Partnerships - 16:30-18:00 Panel 2 UNEP – Industry and other stakeholder partnerships • 18:00-19:00 Side Event 2 Panel discussion on challenges for water and energy in Spain, Ebro River Basin Authority • 19:30 Visit to the Aljafería Palace
  • 12. Session 1: The Business Case for Integrated Energy-Water Planning and Investment Objectives: Strengthen the partnerships among key stakeholders . Understanding the water risks for the energy sector. Demonstrating how integrated policies to waterenergy issues can achieve greater economic and social impacts. Some questions: How research and technology may help demonstrate the advantages for policy coherence? Challenges for companies reaching out to governments? How Governments are enhancing policy coherence?
  • 13. Session 2: Industry partnering with governments to ensure water and energy efficiency and sustainability Objectives: •Discuss emerging trends , their implications and further actions that can be taken by the different stakeholders. •Present partnership cases to tackle the nexus issues, between industry and other stakeholders. •Illustrate how to build capacity to apply to industrial integrated approach in order to facilitate the transfer of environmentally sound technology. •Highlight the need for appropriate responses and regulatory frameworks that account for both water and energy priorities. Questions: What are challenges and opportunities of partnerships on water and energy for industries? What are the opportunities for implementation of improved coordinated/integrated activities? What are the main lessons learnt from public and private partnerships in industries?
  • 14. Linking Zaragoza to Tokyo • Case studies – Success stories for public-private partnerships • Application of technology, research, innovation • Achieving sustainability for water-energy nexus • Creating enabling environment, incentives, funding mechanisms
  • 15. COMMUNICATIONS UPDATE • We are in the homepage of the UN in Spanish and English • And in UN Radio http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/spanish/2014/01/onu -celebra-conferencia-preparatoria-del-dia-mundial-delagua/ • Today we are starting video interviews • Please distribute press release and provide communication contacts in your organizations.