• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Underprepared Students, Underprepared Institutions: Transformation 360º
 

Underprepared Students, Underprepared Institutions: Transformation 360º

on

  • 1,981 views

Academy for College Excellence (ACE) serves under-prepared college students. Through a full-time semester-long accelerated program, ACE helps students learn and transform themselves from the inside ...

Academy for College Excellence (ACE) serves under-prepared college students. Through a full-time semester-long accelerated program, ACE helps students learn and transform themselves from the inside out as they rethink their relationship to learning and to college. But the ACE program works because it transforms institutions as well as students. It is classroom-based, and much of what students in other programs get through outside counseling, ACE students get in the classroom. Over the last 8 years, ACE has demonstrated that it is both sustainable and scalable, today serving over 750 students in seven community colleges across three states. This talk focuses on ACE's program design, the transformations it requires, and how two-year and four-year institutions alike can adapt its approach to their own mission and students.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,981
Views on SlideShare
1,975
Embed Views
6

Actions

Likes
5
Downloads
12
Comments
15

3 Embeds 6

http://wascarc.org 4
https://twitter.com 1
http://www.wascarc.org 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

110 of 15 previous next Post a comment

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…

110 of 15 previous next

Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Underprepared Students, Underprepared Institutions: Transformation 360º Underprepared Students, Underprepared Institutions: Transformation 360º Document Transcript

    • 4/7/11  Underprepared  Students,  Underprepared   Ins3tu3ons:  Transforma3on  360º   WASC-­‐Sr   2011  Academic  Resource  Conference   Diego  Navarro   Founding  Director  &  Instructor   www.my-­‐ace.org     Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)   diego@my-­‐ace.org   Underprepared  Students  &  Ins3tu3ons   QUESTIONS  TO  EXPLORE  TODAY   Context  Underprepared  students  and  Ins3tu3ons   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)?   What  are  the  needs  of  underprepared  student?   What  approaches  work  with  these  students?   What  do  colleges  need  to  do  to  address  these  students?   2   1  
    • 4/7/11   Underprepared  Students  &  Ins3tu3ons  QUESTIONS  TO  EXPLORE  TODAY   Context  Underprepared  students  and  Ins@tu@ons   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)?   What  are  the  needs  of  underprepared  student?   What  approaches  work  with  these  students?   What  do  colleges  need  to  do  to  address  these  students?   3   Underprepared  Students  &  Ins3tu3ons  QUESTIONS  TO  EXPLORE  TODAY   Context  Underprepared  students  and  Ins3tu3ons   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)?   What  are  the  needs  of  underprepared  student?   What  approaches  work  with  these  students?   What  do  colleges  need  to  do  to  address  these  students?   4   2  
    • 4/7/11   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence?   What  is  the  ACE  Model  for  Students?  Integrated  Courses   Bridge  Semester  •   Intensive   12-­‐16  weeks   13.5  CREDITS  •   Accelerated  •   Transforma3ve   Team  Self   Team  Self   Management   Management   PROJECT-­‐BASED   PROJECT-­‐BASED   Career   Computer   Computer   Career   Skills   Social  JJus@ce   Social   us@ce   Planning   Planning   Skills   Research   Research   STUDENT   Course   Course   COHORT  Founda@on   Math   Math   Movement   Movement  Course                                                                                      Two  Week  Intensive       English   English   3  CREDITS   Behavior  System   Behavior  System   6   3  
    • 4/7/11   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence?  PROVEN  SUCCESS  IN  DEVELOPMENTAL  EDUCATION   ACE Cohort Students Cabrillo College Comparison Group Source:  Jenkins,  Davis,   Zeidenberg,  Ma]hew,  and   Wachen,  John,  “Educa3onal   Outcomes  of  Cabrillo   College’s  Digital  Bridge   Academy:  Findings  from  a   Mul3variate  Analysis,”   Community  College  Research   Center,  Teacher’s  College,   Columbia  University,  2009.   7   Underprepared  Students  &  Ins3tu3ons  QUESTIONS  TO  EXPLORE  TODAY   Context  Underprepared  students  and  Ins3tu3ons   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)?   What  are  the  needs  of  underprepared  student?   What  approaches  work  with  these  students?   What  do  colleges  need  to  do  to  address  these  students?   8   4  
    • 4/7/11   “Probably  wrong  and  definitely  incomplete”   Student  Risk  Factors   Issues  of  life  experience  and  circumstances   How  to  create  countervailing  force   to  anchor  students  to  college   Personal  Life   against  their  complex  lives   Academic  Life   which  pull  them  away     Poverty   Experienced  Industrial   Educa3on  Model,   Parental  stress  about  $$   Underperforming  Schools   Unsafe  Neighborhoods,   School  does  not  ins3ll   Violence,  Gangs,  Guns,     21st  century  professional  skills   Trauma,  Domes3c  Abuse   Lack  of  “dorm  life”  and     peer  or  alumni  support   Substance  Abuse,  Addic3ons     Courses  lack  relevancy     Homelessness;  Hunger   or  classes  are  not  interes3ng   Death;  Illness  in  family   First  in  family  to  a]end  college   No  role  models  or  cultural   understanding  of  Higher  Ed   9  Getting to Know Who You Are 5  
    • 4/7/11  Recuperative StrategiesMeeting One’s Dreams 6  
    • 4/7/11   “Probably  wrong  and  definitely  incomplete”   Student  Vulnerabili3es   Issues  that  block  or  deter  students  from  ligh3ng  the  fire  within   Rela@onship  to  SELF   Rela@onship  to  OTHERS   Lack  self-­‐leadership  skills  to  work  Nega3ve  experiences  of  school   Students  have  complex  lives   effec3vely  with  others   Lack  of  career  awareness   Do  not  understand  how  to  design  Live  in  survival  mode;  fear  and  insecurity;    Need  to  be  super-­‐vigilant   effec3ve  teams   Lack  long-­‐term  goals  and  “watch  their  backs”   Do  not  understand  the  condi3ons   Student  needs  to  work     that  create  self-­‐management  in  Lack  self-­‐awareness   and  contribute  to  family   teams   Feel  hopeless,  trapped  Lack  self-­‐agency,  self-­‐regula3on,  and   Lack  collabora3ve  communica3on  the  ability  to  delay  gra3fica3on   skills;    Do  not  see  the  styles  and   strengths  of  teammates    Don’t  see  themselves  as  college  students;  Lack  effec3ve  habits  for   Not  handling  their  own  bio-­‐reac3on  college  success   with  others;  Inappropriate  behaviors;   PTSD  Experiencing  life  as  unfair  and  unjust   Lack  the  tools  and  skills  in  leading/ par3cipa3ng  in  ac3on  Bound  to  cultural  pa]erns  and  expecta3ons   Unable  to  sense  when  others  are  not   on  board   13   Underprepared  Students  &  Ins3tu3ons   QUESTIONS  TO  EXPLORE  TODAY   Context  Underprepared  students  and  Ins3tu3ons   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)?   What  are  the  needs  of  underprepared  student?   What  approaches  work  with  these  students?   What  do  colleges  need  to  do  to  address  these  students?   14   7  
    • 4/7/11   Intensity  of  Student  Support   R&D  Solu3ons  for  Students   High     li 3es abi nerIntensity   u l d  V  an Med   isks e   of  R gn itud Ma t ’s   den Stu Low     College  provides   Current  Dev  Ed  model   ACE  MODEL   usual  services    of  outside-­‐class  support  services   24/7  Curriculum-­‐based   Peer  Network  Support   Types  of  Student  Support   15   Intensity  of  Student  Support    Student  Support  Cost  Comparison   High   Current  Dev  Ed  model   COST  OF  DELIVERY     of  outside-­‐class   support  services   Med   College  provides   24/7  Curriculum-­‐based   Low     usual  services   Peer  Network  Support   INTENSITY  OF  STUDENT  SUPPORT   16   8  
    • 4/7/11   A College’s Total Incremental Program Cost per Cohort and per Student Drops Significantly After the First Couple of Years (Analysis performed by FSG Social Impact Advisors) Total Incremental College Cost Divided by Cohorts per Year and Students per Year Growth Maturity $25,000 $24,375 $7,000 Average Cost per cohort Average Cost per student $6,000 $5,000 $4,000 $3,000 $2,000 $1,000 $0 Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 # students 0 50 150 250 350 450 450 450 450 450 served per yearACE1_Slide Library_090910 17 © FSG Social Impact Advisors Professional   Competencies     Managing  Ac3on     Project  management     Team  self-­‐management     Par3cipa3ng  in  knowledge  crea3on     Managing  innova3on     Developing  and  selling  one’s  ideas     Budge3ng  &  proposal  crea3on     Facilita3ng  change     IT  Skills  –  MS  Office  Suite     Culture  of  Knowledge  Work   4/6/11   9  
    • 4/7/11   Personal     Competencies     Team  work     Self-­‐discipline     Seeing  styles  of  others     Compassion     Non-­‐violent  communica3on  4/6/11   Academic   Competencies     Analyzing  informa3on     Becoming  an  expert     Developing  solu3ons  &  plans     Learning  to  work  in  teams     Purng  thoughts  into  speech     Wri3ng  at  college-­‐level     Learning  math  4/6/11   10  
    • 4/7/11   How  is  ACE  different   than  other  programs?   •  Repairs  the  damage  done  by   past  educa@onal  experiences   •  Transforms  student  from  the   inside  out   •  Helps  them  believe  they  can   do  it   •  U@lizes  strength  of  student:   social  jus@ce  focus   •  Creates  a  virtual  dorm   through  the  cohort  model   What  we  do  We  take  students  who  know  how  to  survive  &  persist   Help  them  translate  these  strengths     into  the  academic  environment   So  they  become  more  effec@ve  people,     not  just  more  effec3ve  students   11  
    • 4/7/11   How  we  do  it     Transform  student  from  the  inside  out     Recognize  the  importance  of  the  affec3ve  domain     Repair  damage  done  by  past  life  experiences     U3lize  strength  of  student:  social  jus3ce  focus     Help  them  believe  they  can  do  it     Synthesize  diverse  theories  &  prac3ces   Affec@ve  Domain  Rela3onship  to  Self   Rela3onship  to  Others    Self-­‐Iden3ty  –  Am  I  a  student?     A]uned  communica3on    Self-­‐Efficacy  –  Can  I  make  it  in     Empathy  &  social  awareness   the  academic  world?     Leadership  &  team  work    Self-­‐Determina3on  –  What     Social  &  emo3onal  learning   professional  career  do  I  want?     Belonging  &  community    Self-­‐Organiza3on  –  Can  I  set  &   achieve  goals?      Self-­‐Regula3on  –  Can  I  control   myself  to  achieve  what  I  want?   12  
    • 4/7/11   Repair  Damage   Create  the  condi3ons  for  learning  by     allevia3ng  symptoms  such  as:   Hyper-­‐arousal   Loss  of  concentra3on   Emo3onal  numbing   Intrusive  thoughts   Bio-­‐reac3on  on  minor  s3muli  Diverse  theories  &  prac@ces   Social  learning  theory   Self-­‐efficacy  theory   Self-­‐regula3on  theory   Language  immersion  theory   Neuroplas3city  theory   13  
    • 4/7/11  How  does  ACE  curriculum  benefit  students?   Promotes   persistence  to   later  semesters  How  does  ACE  curriculum  benefit  students?   Promotes   persistence  to   later  semesters   Accelerates  them   through  the   remedial   sequence  to   transfer-­‐level   courses   14  
    • 4/7/11  How  does  ACE  curriculum  benefit  students?   Promotes   persistence  to   later  semesters   Accelerates  them   through  the   remedial   sequence  to   transfer-­‐level   courses   Helps  them     accumulate   college  &   transfer-­‐level   credits  faster   Underprepared  Students  &  Ins3tu3ons   QUESTIONS  TO  EXPLORE  TODAY   Context  Underprepared  students  and  Ins3tu3ons   What  is  the  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)?   What  are  the  needs  of  underprepared  student?   What  approaches  work  with  these  students?   What  do  colleges  need  to  do  to  address  these  students?   30   15  
    • 4/7/11   What  do  Colleges  Need?          #1   •  Develop  the  capacity  for  ac3on  and  change   •  ACE  Faculty  Experien3al  Learning  Ins3tute  and  Professional   Development  workshops   –  Faculty:  learn  to  work  collabora3vely  with  peers   –  Colleges:  create  a  culture  of  effec3ve  ac3on  and  change/innova3on   ACE  Adop3on  Methodology  MAJOR  STAGES  OF  ACE  PARTNER  COLLEGE  RELATIONSHIPS   QUALIFYING  STAGE   Discovery   Due   Commit-­‐ Transi3on   Imple-­‐ STAGE   ACTIVATING   Live   SUSTAINING  STAGE   Steady   Scaling   Ins3tu-­‐   Diligence   ment   Planning   menta-­‐   Cohorts   State   3onaliza-­‐ (3  to  6  months)   (3  to  93ononths)    m   (2  to  5  years)     3on Phase  1   Phase  2   Phase  3   Phase  4   Phase  5   Phase  6   Phase  7   Phase  8   Phase  9          SUSTAINING   •     Scaling   •     Ins3tu3onaliza3on          ACTIVATING   •     Steady  State   •     Transi3on   •     Implementa3on      QUALIFYING   •     Live  Cohorts   •   Discovery   •   Due  Diligence   •   Commitment   32   16  
    • 4/7/11   ACE  Adop3on  Methodology   THE  WORK  OF  ADOPTION  IS  COORDINATED  IN  EACH  OF    5  TRACKS   QUALIFYING     Discovery   Due   Commit-­‐ ACTIVATING     Live   Transi3on   Steady   SUSTAINING     on   Scaling   STAGE   ment   Diligence   Planning   STAGE   Cohorts   State   STAGE   Phase  1   Phase  2   Phase  3   Phase  4   Phase  5   Phase  6   Phase  7   Phase  8   Phase  9  Management    Of  Change  Curriculum  Professional  Development  Scheduling  Recrui@ng  &  Student  Support   33   ACE  Adop3on  Model  ACE  WORKSHOPS  AND  TOOLS  PROVIDE  SUPPORT  AS  NEEDED     QUALIFYING     Discovery   Due   Commit-­‐ ACTIVATING     Live   Transi3on   Steady   SUSTAINING    on   Scaling   STAGE   ment   Diligence   Planning   STAGE   Cohorts   State   STAGE   Phase  1   Phase  2   Phase  3   Phase  4   Phase  5   Phase  6   Phase  7   Phase  8   Phase  9  Management     Workshop  Of  Change   Intersec3on  of  a  Track  +  Phase   ACE   Module  name  “ACE  302-­‐C”  means  Curriculum   302-­‐C   Curriculum  Track  near  Phase  3  Professional  Development   Tools  &  Services  Scheduling   ACE  SEA  (Self-­‐Efficacy  Assessment)   tool  is  an  example  of  ACE’s  early   warning  system  Recrui@ng  &   ACE  Student  Support   SEA   34   17  
    • 4/7/11   What  do  Colleges  Need?        #2   •  Understand  the  impact  of  their  interven3ons   •  Describe  the  theory  of  change  and  why  the  interven3on  works   Pathway  to  Solu3ons  Ar@culated   Final  Program  Problems   Iden@fy   Design  • Academic  Needs   Theories  &   Solu@on   Pilo@ng  • Risk  Levels   Methods   Ac@vi@es   Solu@ons  • Vulnerabili3es   36   18  
    • 4/7/11   ACE  Student  Outcomes  Logic  Model   Short-­‐term   Intermediate   Long-­‐term   Ac@vi@es   Outcomes   Outcomes   Outcomes   (Bridge  Semester)   Personal  development     ACE   •Self-­‐efficacy   Curriculum   •Self-­‐esteem   and  Pedagogy   •Awareness          ________   •Hope/op@mism   Enrollment/ •Iden@ty  as  college   Persistence  Target  and   Founda@on   Course   student   PersistencRecruit   e   Skills  &  Knowledge   Credits    Students   Bridge     •Academic     Semester   •College  &  Career   •Professional  behaviors     Academic   Achievement  and   Support   21st  Century  Skills   Progress     •Communica@on  &   Comple@on   Approach     Listening   •Leadership   Self-­‐Efficacy            _______   •Teamwork   Cohort   Peer  Support  Network   Model   Credits  Earned     Assump@ons   •  Community  colleges  represent  a  realis3c  avenue  to  higher  educa3on  and  success  in  life,  but  low-­‐ income,  underprepared  students  who  reflect  a  combina3on  of  risk  factors  are  oxen  not  well  served   by  those  colleges  through  developmental  educa3on  programs.   •  Students  from  high  risk  groups  must  be  given  the  opportunity  through  transforma3ve  educa3onal   experiences  to  develop  the  essen3al  knowledge,  technical  skills,  and  creden3als  that  will  allow   them  to  succeed  in  the  workplace.   37   Promote  Integrity   to  ensure  student  outcomes   Integrity  to  the  curriculum   Integrity  to  the  model  as   Integrity  to  the  model     as  experienced  by  the   it  is  implemented  in  a   as  implemented  by  the   students     cohort     college   •  Founda3on  Course   •  Behavior  System   •  English  /  Math  accelera3on   •  Team  Self  Management     •  Faculty  lead  role   •  FC  teacher  also  teaches  one   •  Social  Jus3ce  Research   •  Faculty  cohort  role   of  the  Bridge  courses   Course   •  FELI  training   To  promote  integrity:   •  Create  ACE  Integrity  Architecture  to  clearly  define  requirements;  embed  in  adop3on  methodology   •  Deliver  workshops  and  ins3tutes  to  transfer  understanding  of  ACE  curriculum  and  approach   •  Provide  adop3on  support  to  faculty,  staff  and  administrators  regarding  implementa3on  and  scaling   •  Create  and  implement  cer3fica3on  program  for  master  mentors  and  teachers   •  Collect  and  analyze  student  outcomes  data  and  feedback   •  Develop  regional  events  to  share  experiences  and  develop  new  ideas   19  
    • 4/7/11   Model  of  Factors  Related  to  ACE  Program    ACE Sources of Psychological OutcomesProgram Self-Efficacy & ProcessesComponents Identity Enactive Mastery Academic & Career Self- PerformanceCurriculum Efficacy Vicarious ExperiencesFaculty Academic & Career Behaviors Identity Social PersuasionPeer Support Leadership & Teamwork Attitudes Efficacy Emotional Experience 39   Understanding  the  Student  Vulnerability  Profile   40   20  
    • 4/7/11   Understanding  the  Student  Vulnerability  Profile   Structural  Equa3on  Model  of  ACE  Process  and  Outcomes   41   Na3onal  Science  Founda3on  Funded  Studies   Data  Collec3on  and  Evalua3ons   Funded by National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (ATE) grants Higher Education Evaluation and Research Group (HEERG) N. Badway (2005 and 2007) Two longitudinal studies examined characteristics of participants in the Foundation Course and Bridge Semester and the personal and academic growth related to participation. Report 1 Student  Outcomes  Evalua<on     Compares outcomes before and after DBA (now called ACE) to aggregate statistics on California community college students. Report 2 Persistence  and  Achievement Analyzes retention, credits earned, and GPA during the DBA (ACE) program; persistence, credit accumulation, and grade point change subsequent to the first semester of DBA (ACE); and compares outcomes to other Cabrillo College students.  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)  was  formerly  known  as  Digital  Bridge  Academy  (DBA)   42   21  
    • 4/7/11   University  of  California  Faculty  Training  Studies   Data  Collec3on  and  Evalua3ons   Funded by The James Irvine Foundation⌃ and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation* Center for Justice, Tolerance & Community at University of California Santa Cruz Three studies in 2006 and 2007 ⌃Passing the Torch: An Evaluation of the Digital Bridge Academy Replication (London, Smith, and George, 2006) Examined the pilot phase of faculty training, course curriculum and principles; Found that students of all ethnicities and geographic locations respond positively to the Foundation Course, and that the training approach was successful in helping faculty new to the DBA (ACE) embrace its components. ⌃Policy and Institutional Issues Related to Digital Bridge Academy Replication (Navarro, Smith, George, and London, 2006) Discussed the policy-related issues involved with replicating the program at other colleges. ⌃* Feeding The Fire: Professional Development and the Digital Bridge Academy Faculty Training (Schirmer, Rosner, London, Bullock, 2007) Examined how  DBA  (ACE) philosophy  and  curriculum  aid  faculty  in  teaching  their   DBA  and  non-­‐DBA  (ACE)  courses; and the broader implications this has for faculty and community colleges.  Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)  was  formerly  known  as  Digital  Bridge  Academy  (DBA)   43   Columbia  University  CCRC  Longitudinal  Study   Data  Collec3on  and  Evalua3ons   Funded by The James Irvine Foundation⌃ and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation* Columbia University: Community College Research Center Jenkins, D., Hayward, C. (2009) Educational Outcomes of the Academy for College Excellence: Findings from a Multivariate Analysis Compared educational outcomes of the first nine cohorts of DBA (ACE) students with other students at Cabrillo who did not participate in the program. This study found significant positive effects for participation in both the accelerated and non- accelerated versions of the DBA (ACE).Academy  for  College  Excellence  (ACE)  was  formerly  known  as  Digital  Bridge  Academy  (DBA)   44   22  
    • 4/7/11   Gates  Founda3on  Funded  Longitudinal  Studies   Data  Collec3on  and  Evalua3ons   ACE  Evalua3on  Design– for 5 year longitudinal study   Funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation MPR Associates (2010-2015) in progress Evaluation of the Academy for College Excellence and its Variations at other Community Colleges Rigorous  quan3ta3ve  evalua3on  of  ACE  and  various   implementa3ons  of  the  model  on  other  campuses.     Evalua3ng  both  the  student  program  and  the  Faculty  Experien3al   Learning  Ins3tute  (FELI).   Measures  of  student  self-­‐efficacy  and  other  personal  growth   indicators  will  be  analyzed  with  rela3on  to  achievement   outcomes  and  student  reten3on.     Will provide the Academy, the Gates Foundation, and participating colleges with data and information that will support ongoing program improvement and contribute knowledge to the field about features of the model that relate most strongly to positive outcomes for students. 45   What  do  Colleges  Need?    #3  •  Ability  to  facilitate  change  to  adopt  and  scale  innova3ons   –  Educa3onal  approach  to  faculty  development  and  college  leadership   capacity  building   23  
    • 4/7/11   What  has  ACE  learned  about  scaling?        CODIFY        TEST        STRATEGIZE        MANAGE  THE  CHANGE   47   What  has  ACE  learned  about  scaling?        CODIFY  Use  replicable  ar3facts   •   ACE  Curriculum  Kits    (curriculum,  training)  to  codify   •   ACE  Professional  Development  key  insights  and  promote  integrity  Document  a  clear,  detailed   •   ACE  Adop3on  Methodology  approach  to  implemen3ng  the   •   ACE  Integrity  Architecture  innova3on  at  new  ins3tu3ons   48   24  
    • 4/7/11   What  has  ACE  learned  about  scaling?        TEST   •  Five  40-­‐hour  pilots  tes3ng  nine  Pilot  test  the  curriculum     sets  of  curriculum  Check  to  be  sure  it  can  be  taught   •  Third-­‐party  study  by  non-­‐founders   •  Train-­‐the-­‐trainer  test   •  Scaling  bonus  for  colleges  to  go  Run  tests  that  “push  the   beyond  current  cohort  level  envelope”   revealed  barriers   49   What  has  ACE  learned  about  scaling?        STRATEGIZE   •  ACE  Regional  Adop3on  Model  Look  for  economies  of  scale  in  the   for  Bridge  Semester  rollout  strategy     •  But  not  for  standalone   Professional  Development  Determine  all  roles  that  are  cri3cal  for  success  (not  just   •  ACE  Adop3on  Workshops  faculty  but  also  administrators  and  staff)  and  train  them  Be  clear  about  what’s  required  vs.   •  ACE  Integrity  Architecture  recommended,  and  promote   •  ACE  Integrity  Audit  replica3on  integrity   50   25  
    • 4/7/11   What  has  ACE  learned  about  scaling?        MANAGE  THE  CHANGE   •  Not  just  tops-­‐down  but  also     Shared  governance  requires        bo]oms-­‐up  approaches   shared  sponsorship   •  Bring  together  mul3ple  levels  &  silos   Look  at  the  larger  system     •  ACE  Elements  Drive  Systemic  Change   and  work  those  levers   •  Early  adopters     Understand  the  mo3va3on          –  Being  part  of  the  movement   of  your  early  adopters  vs.   •  Mainstream  adopters     mainstream  adopters  and        –  Making  a  living  while  doing   adapt  rewards  accordingly          something  good   51  Underprepared  Students,  Underprepared   Ins3tu3ons:  Transforma3on  360º   WASC-­‐Sr   2011  Academic  Resource  Conference   Diego  Navarro   www.my-­‐ace.org     Founding  Director  &   diego@my-­‐ace.org   Instructor   26