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Regulatory Landscape The Triad 1 10

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Ralph A. Wolff, President and Executive Director …

Ralph A. Wolff, President and Executive Director
Western Association of Schools and Colleges
Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities

Published in: Education

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  • 1. Regulatory Landscape:The Triad
  • 2. 2
    DGREE
    Overview of U.S. Higher Education
    Greatest diversity of institutions in the world
    Long considered the best system in the world
    Major innovations – independent boards of trustees, community colleges, open access
    Massification since Korean War
  • 3. 3
    DGREE
    Mission Differentiation
    Research
    Liberal arts
    Comprehensive universities
    Community colleges
    Faith-based
    Specialized/single purpose
    “One solution/model won’t fit all.”
  • 4. 4
    DGREE
    Institutions
    Public 4-year institutions 643
    Public 2-year institutions 1,045
    Private 4-year institutions, nonprofit 1,533
    Private 4-year institutions, for-profit 453
    Private 2-year institutions, nonprofit 107
    Private 2-year institutions, for-profit 533
    Total 4,314
  • 5. 5
    DGREE
    Where Students Go
    Public 4-year institutions 6,955,013 (39%)
    Public 2-year institutions 6,225,120 (35%)
    Private 4-year institutions 4,285,317 (24%)
    Private 2-year institutions 293,420 (1%)
    Total17,758,870
    81% of all freshmen in the fall of 2006 who had graduated from high school in the previous year attended colleges in their home states.
  • 6. Where Has Growth Occurred?
    Public 4 yr: 10 yr. 19%
    Public 2 yr: 10 yr. 28%
    Private (nonprofit): 10 yr. 19%
    For profit: 10 yr. 285%
    Distance Education: 2.1 million (F2008)
    Share held by for profits 42%
    6
    DGREE
  • 7. Key Values of Traditional H.E.
    Academic freedom
    Institutional autonomy
    Mission distinctiveness
    Shared governance (faculty control over curriculum)
    7
    DGREE
  • 8. Key Shifts
    De-institutionalization of learning
    National footprint institutions
    Online education on and off campus
    Increased inter-institutional arrangements
    Increased accountability
    8
    DGREE
  • 9. Regulatory Environment
    External
    -- States
    -- Federal
    -- Accreditation
    Internal
    -- Systems
    -- Faculty senates
    9
    DGREE
  • 10. States
    50 different regulatory approaches
    Licensure of degree granting institutions
    Prior approval of new campuses, sites, programs
    Differing regulatory patterns for distance education
    10
    DGREE
  • 11. Accreditation
    Institutional
    -- Regional
    -- National
    -- Religious
    Specialized/Professional
    -- > 60 and growing
    11
    DGREE
  • 12. History and Authority
    Created by institutions over 100 years ago
    Private and nongovernmental
    Peer review self regulation
    Mission-centered; Individual institution based
    Minimum standards, improvement or accountability
    6 regions; 7 commissions (140 – 1080 institutions)
    12
    DGREE
  • 13. Federal Linkage
    1952 link to federal financial aid
    Formal recognition process (5 years)
    Currently 10 standards, 75 pages of regulations
    Concern over $80 billion in financial aid
    More regulations coming
    13
    DGREE
  • 14. Key Regulatory Issues
    Transfer of credit
    Student academic achievement
    Institutional growth, periodic monitoring
    Substantive change (all of campus sites and changes in modality of learning)
    Correspondence vs. distance education
    Definition of a credit hour
    Occupational codes and placement requirements
    14
    DGREE
  • 15. Time to Accreditation
    New Institution (Regional): 4-7 years
    -- Eligibility, Candidacy, Initial Accreditation
    New Institution – (National): 1-2 years
    Acquisition (ownership/control): 6-12 months
    -- Agency approval
    -- USDE approval (PPA)
    Affiliation: 6 months
    15
    DGREE
  • 16. WASC: Incubator and Capacity Builder
    160 institutions; > 800,000 fte students
    1996-2001 Experimentation and dialogue
    Transformed focus from inputs to outcomes
    Innovative multi-stage learning centered model
    Goal is to change the fundamental conversation about accreditation – from compliance to collaborative inquiry
    Redefined our role as capacity building
    16
    DGREE
  • 17. Key Challenges
    What should be the standards of quality for 2012-2020?
    Should there be common outcomes for the bachelor’s degree?
    What is good enough?
    How do we encourage innovation and then review it?
    17
    DGREE
  • 18. Can we move beyond accrediting institutions to new platforms, competencies and new models?
    Can WASC itself become a model what we want our institutions to become? Open, transparent, innovative, etc.
    18
    DGREE
  • 19. 19
    DGREE
    Can We Move To the Next Level?
    “The problems we have cannot be solved at the same level of thinking at which we created them.” Albert Einstein
    WASC needs your best ideas to redefine and transform accreditation to meet the changes that you will crate as a result of this conference.

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