Source Selection

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Primary, secondary or tertiary information which will you need to complete your research.

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  • Diaries
    Speeches
    Photographs
    Letters
    Manuscripts
    Oral Histories
    Political Cartoons
    Sheet Music
    Sound Recordings
    Motion Pictures
    Maps
  • Biographies
    Books
    Commentaries
    Dissertations
    Bibliographies
    Indexes
    Abstracts
    Journal Articles
  • Almanacs
    Digests
    Dictionaries
    Encyclopedias
    Fact books
    Pathfinders
    Overviews
    Guide Books
    Overviews
  • Source Selection

    1. 1. Source Selection
    2. 2. What type of information do you need for this topic? Once you have formulated a topic question you can determine the type of information that’s needed to develop a theme.
    3. 3. Primary This is firsthand information. Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is primary information. It was written by Lincoln himself. It contains his thought’s about the situation.
    4. 4. Primary Source Examples They can come in many forms. • Diaries • Speeches • Photographs • Letters • Manuscripts • Oral Histories • Political Cartoons • Sheet Music • Sound Recordings • Motion Pictures • Maps • Other A primary resource provides direct, first- hand, evidence of the topic under investigation
    5. 5. Secondary This is secondhand information. A book written commenting on the historical importance of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is an example of a secondary source. It contains another person’s reflections after the fact of the speech.
    6. 6. Secondary Source Examples They can come in many forms. • Books about an event • Commentaries • Dissertations • Biographies • Indexes • Abstracts • Journal Articles A secondary source is something written about a primary source event. It provides analysis, critique or interpretation of the topic under investigation.
    7. 7. This is thirdhand information. An article on the Gettysburg Address in an encyclopedia is a tertiary resource. It contains information about the speech in a brief form. Tertiary
    8. 8. Tertiary Source Examples They can come in many forms. • Almanacs • Digests • Dictionaries • Encyclopedias • Fact books • Pathfinders • Overviews • Guide Books • Overviews A tertiary source provides the bare facts without analysis, critique or interpretation of the topic under investigation.
    9. 9. Confused? It’s simple. For background information you use tertiary sources. • Dictionaries • Encyclopedias • Guides • Fact books The sources provide thirdhand information discussing the bare facts.
    10. 10. It’s Easy! Primary and secondary sources are items you’ll use in constructing your research. They provide firsthand access to the original events and the secondhand reflection upon the events.
    11. 11. We’ll answer the question “Where do you start?”
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