Source Selection
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Source Selection

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Primary, secondary or tertiary information which will you need to complete your research.

Primary, secondary or tertiary information which will you need to complete your research.

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  • Diaries <br /> Speeches <br /> Photographs <br /> Letters <br /> Manuscripts <br /> Oral Histories <br /> Political Cartoons <br /> Sheet Music <br /> Sound Recordings <br /> Motion Pictures <br /> Maps <br />
  • Biographies <br /> Books <br /> Commentaries <br /> Dissertations <br /> Bibliographies <br /> Indexes <br /> Abstracts <br /> Journal Articles <br />
  • Almanacs <br /> Digests <br /> Dictionaries <br /> Encyclopedias <br /> Fact books <br /> Pathfinders <br /> Overviews <br /> Guide Books <br /> Overviews <br />

Source Selection Source Selection Presentation Transcript

  • Source Selection
  • What type of information do you need for this topic? Once you have formulated a topic question you can determine the type of information that’s needed to develop a theme.
  • Primary This is firsthand information. Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is primary information. It was written by Lincoln himself. It contains his thought’s about the situation.
  • Primary Source Examples They can come in many forms. • Diaries • Speeches • Photographs • Letters • Manuscripts • Oral Histories • Political Cartoons • Sheet Music • Sound Recordings • Motion Pictures • Maps • Other A primary resource provides direct, first- hand, evidence of the topic under investigation
  • Secondary This is secondhand information. A book written commenting on the historical importance of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is an example of a secondary source. It contains another person’s reflections after the fact of the speech.
  • Secondary Source Examples They can come in many forms. • Books about an event • Commentaries • Dissertations • Biographies • Indexes • Abstracts • Journal Articles A secondary source is something written about a primary source event. It provides analysis, critique or interpretation of the topic under investigation.
  • This is thirdhand information. An article on the Gettysburg Address in an encyclopedia is a tertiary resource. It contains information about the speech in a brief form. Tertiary
  • Tertiary Source Examples They can come in many forms. • Almanacs • Digests • Dictionaries • Encyclopedias • Fact books • Pathfinders • Overviews • Guide Books • Overviews A tertiary source provides the bare facts without analysis, critique or interpretation of the topic under investigation.
  • Confused? It’s simple. For background information you use tertiary sources. • Dictionaries • Encyclopedias • Guides • Fact books The sources provide thirdhand information discussing the bare facts.
  • It’s Easy! Primary and secondary sources are items you’ll use in constructing your research. They provide firsthand access to the original events and the secondhand reflection upon the events.
  • We’ll answer the question “Where do you start?”