Origins of us govt part 3 & 4
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Origins of us govt part 3 & 4

on

  • 358 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
358
Views on SlideShare
327
Embed Views
31

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 31

http://www.sanjuan.edu 31

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Origins of us govt part 3 & 4 Origins of us govt part 3 & 4 Presentation Transcript

  • Part 3: Trouble StartsPart 3: Trouble Starts  Your goal: Be able toYour goal: Be able to describe how and why thedescribe how and why the United States became aUnited States became a nation.nation.
  • French and Indian WarFrench and Indian War In 1754, England was at war withIn 1754, England was at war with France in Europe and around theFrance in Europe and around the world (The Seven Years War).world (The Seven Years War). England had to keep the FrenchEngland had to keep the French from taking away her Americanfrom taking away her American colonies.colonies. Protect the colonie s.
  • French and Indian WarFrench and Indian War England and the Colonies vs. French and the IndiansEngland and the Colonies vs. French and the Indians War costs money . England Wins!
  • Quick QuizQuick Quiz  Who won the French and Indian War?Who won the French and Indian War?  A) FranceA) France  B) IndiaB) India  C) Native AmericansC) Native Americans  D) EnglandD) England
  • The French and Indian WarThe French and Indian War  (1754 – 1763) gave the(1754 – 1763) gave the British control of theBritish control of the eastern part of Northeastern part of North America.America.  The colonies no longerThe colonies no longer needed protection fromneeded protection from the French.the French.  The war left the BritishThe war left the British government in debt.government in debt.  The colonies wereThe colonies were expected to help repay.expected to help repay.
  • Stamp ActStamp Act  Taxes on the colonists toTaxes on the colonists to help repay this debt.help repay this debt.  The first was theThe first was the StampStamp ActAct – it required a tax on– it required a tax on legal documents,legal documents, pamphlets, newspapers,pamphlets, newspapers, dice, and playing cards.dice, and playing cards.  It was the first direct taxIt was the first direct tax on the colonists.on the colonists.
  • The Stamp ActThe Stamp Act  Colonists protested andColonists protested and boycotted British goods.boycotted British goods.  What is a boycott?What is a boycott?  Parliament repealed theParliament repealed the Stamp Act but replaced itStamp Act but replaced it with other tax laws.with other tax laws.
  • The Intolerable ActsThe Intolerable Acts  Parliament passedParliament passed punitive* laws calledpunitive* laws called the Intolerable Actsthe Intolerable Acts by colonists.by colonists.  The colonies began toThe colonies began to unite in protest.unite in protest. * Punitive: a punishment
  • Colonial UnrestColonial Unrest  1765 Stamp Act (“Taxation Without1765 Stamp Act (“Taxation Without Representation”)Representation”) * Help pay for French and Indian War* Help pay for French and Indian War * Tax on printed items* Tax on printed items * Stamp Act Congress met* Stamp Act Congress met * Act repealed after Declaration of Rights and* Act repealed after Declaration of Rights and GrievancesGrievances  1767 Townsend Act (Boston1767 Townsend Act (Boston Massacre)Massacre) * Tax on imports* Tax on imports * Repealed after colonial uprising* Repealed after colonial uprising Why did they protest?
  • Colonial UnrestColonial Unrest  1773 Tea Act (Boston Tea Party)1773 Tea Act (Boston Tea Party) * Tax on Tea* Tax on Tea * England was trying to show who was in* England was trying to show who was in charge.charge.  1774 Intolerable Acts (punishment)1774 Intolerable Acts (punishment) * Reaction of England to the colonial uprisings* Reaction of England to the colonial uprisings * Taxes on almost everything* Taxes on almost everything * Boston Harbor closed to punish for the “Tea* Boston Harbor closed to punish for the “Tea Party”Party” * Forbade local meetings* Forbade local meetings * Quartering Act* Quartering Act Why did they protest ?
  • Part 4: Confederation*Part 4: Confederation*  Your goal: Be able to describeYour goal: Be able to describe the strengths and weaknessesthe strengths and weaknesses of the first attempts at unitingof the first attempts at uniting the colonies.the colonies. *Confederation: Joining several groups for a common purpose
  • The Albany PlanThe Albany Plan  June 1754: representatives met in New York.June 1754: representatives met in New York.  Adopted the Albany plan of union drafted byAdopted the Albany plan of union drafted by Benjamin Franklin.Benjamin Franklin.  Each colony would elect delegates* to anEach colony would elect delegates* to an American assembly with a royal governor.American assembly with a royal governor.  They are still loyal to England!They are still loyal to England! *Delegate: a representative
  • The Albany PlanThe Albany Plan  Approved by representativesApproved by representatives  Rejected by coloniesRejected by colonies  Rejected by EnglandRejected by England  They are still separate colonies.They are still separate colonies.
  • Stamp Act CongressStamp Act Congress  TheThe Stamp Act CongressStamp Act Congress metmet in 1765 to protest the actionsin 1765 to protest the actions of George III.of George III.  They sent a petition to the kingThey sent a petition to the king protesting direct taxes on theprotesting direct taxes on the colonies.colonies.  Declaration of Rights andDeclaration of Rights and GrievancesGrievances  This was the colonies’ first bigThis was the colonies’ first big attempt to oppose the Britishattempt to oppose the British government.government.
  • Stamp Act CongressStamp Act Congress  Parliament repealed theParliament repealed the act, but made new lawsact, but made new laws instead.instead.  Parliament wanted toParliament wanted to prove they were still inprove they were still in charge.charge.
  • First Continental CongressFirst Continental Congress  1774, First Continental1774, First Continental Congress met inCongress met in Philadelphia to discussPhiladelphia to discuss how to deal with Britain.how to deal with Britain.  Meeting included SamuelMeeting included Samuel Adams and GeorgeAdams and George WashingtonWashington  They decided they hadThey decided they had three options.three options. George Washington
  • First Continental CongressFirst Continental Congress  Three options:Three options:  Just accept the King’sJust accept the King’s tighter rules and go ontighter rules and go on  Try to work with theTry to work with the King and find middleKing and find middle groundground  oror  Declare IndependenceDeclare Independence (not ready yet)(not ready yet)
  • First Continental CongressFirst Continental Congress  The decision:The decision:  Declaration of Rights andDeclaration of Rights and Grievances (again)Grievances (again)  Embargo*Embargo* on Britain untilon Britain until British policies changeBritish policies change  King George III declaredKing George III declared the colonies in a state ofthe colonies in a state of rebellion.rebellion. *Embargo: an agreement to prohibit trade That’s treason!
  • The American RevolutionThe American Revolution  April 19, 1775, “theApril 19, 1775, “the shot heard ‘round theshot heard ‘round the world” was firedworld” was fired beginning thebeginning the American Revolution.American Revolution.  British soldiersBritish soldiers clashed withclashed with American minutemenAmerican minutemen at Lexington andat Lexington and Concord.Concord.
  • Second Continental CongressSecond Continental Congress  1775, The Second Continental1775, The Second Continental Congress took the powers ofCongress took the powers of central government.central government.  This became the first nationalThis became the first national government of the 13 colonies.government of the 13 colonies.  The colonies were no longerThe colonies were no longer loyal to England.loyal to England.  John Hancock was madeJohn Hancock was made President.President. John Hancock
  • Second Continental CongressSecond Continental Congress  The Second ContinentalThe Second Continental Congress took action as aCongress took action as a sovereign* nation tosovereign* nation to  Organize an army and navyOrganize an army and navy  Issue moneyIssue money  Purchase suppliesPurchase supplies  Negotiate treatiesNegotiate treaties *Sovereign: able to make independent decisions
  • Lee ResolutionLee Resolution  July 2, 1776, RichardJuly 2, 1776, Richard Henry Lee issued theHenry Lee issued the Lee Resolution*Lee Resolution*  ““that these unitedthat these united colonies are, and ofcolonies are, and of right ought to be, freeright ought to be, free and independentand independent states.”states.” Don’t take notes. Just listen. *Resolution: a suggested solution to a problem Richard Henry Lee
  • Declaration of IndependenceDeclaration of Independence  July 4, 1776, CongressJuly 4, 1776, Congress passes Thomaspasses Thomas Jefferson’sJefferson’s Declaration ofDeclaration of IndependenceIndependence ..  The colonies declaredThe colonies declared independence fromindependence from England.England.
  • Declaration of IndependenceDeclaration of Independence  Parts of the document:Parts of the document:  Preamble (why)Preamble (why)  Declaration of natural rightsDeclaration of natural rights (political philosophy)(political philosophy)  Grievances against GeorgeGrievances against George III (complaints)III (complaints)  Resolution (what are weResolution (what are we going to do about it)going to do about it)
  • Preamble to thePreamble to the Declaration of IndependenceDeclaration of Independence  When in the course of human events, itWhen in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolvebecomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected themthe political bands which have connected them with another; and to assume among the powerswith another; and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station toof the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s Godwhich the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions ofentitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind require that they should declare themankind require that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.causes which impel them to the separation.
  • The American RevolutionThe American Revolution  Then we fought forThen we fought for independence.independence.  1775-17831775-1783
  • Articles of ConfederationArticles of Confederation  TheThe Articles ofArticles of ConfederationConfederation werewere written and approved bywritten and approved by the Second Continentalthe Second Continental Congress in 1777.Congress in 1777.  They wereThey were ratifiedratified* in* in 1781, by the 13 states.1781, by the 13 states. *Ratified: approved Original States The Thirteen
  • Articles of ConfederationArticles of Confederation  The Articles were a plan ofThe Articles were a plan of government to take over thegovernment to take over the system of government set upsystem of government set up by the Second Continentalby the Second Continental Congress.Congress.  ““a firm league of friendship”a firm league of friendship”  Each state kept sovereigntyEach state kept sovereignty and independence.and independence.  States would come togetherStates would come together for “common defense” (moneyfor “common defense” (money and troops)and troops)  States would treat citizens ofStates would treat citizens of other states fairly.other states fairly. *Ratified: approved
  • Articles of ConfederationArticles of Confederation  What kind of mood doWhat kind of mood do you think the coloniesyou think the colonies were in?were in?  How did that moodHow did that mood affect the way thisaffect the way this document was written?document was written?  The Articles were a plan of government toThe Articles were a plan of government to take over the system of government settake over the system of government set up by the Second Continental Congress.up by the Second Continental Congress.
  • Articles of ConfederationArticles of Confederation  Government structure under theGovernment structure under the Articles of Confederation:Articles of Confederation:  Unicameral* Congress from whichUnicameral* Congress from which executive positions were chosenexecutive positions were chosen  No federal court systemNo federal court system  Congress decided on issuesCongress decided on issues between statesbetween states  Each state had one vote no matterEach state had one vote no matter its size or population.its size or population. *Unicameral: one chamber, or one house
  • Weakness of the ArticlesWeakness of the Articles  Congress could not collect taxesCongress could not collect taxes  Congress could not enforce lawsCongress could not enforce laws  Needed 9 of 13 votes to pass lawsNeeded 9 of 13 votes to pass laws  Amending* the Articles requiredAmending* the Articles required consent ofconsent of allall the coloniesthe colonies  No national court systemNo national court system Weak Sauce ArticlesWeak Sauce Articles *Amend: to change 100%
  • Wimpy ArticlesWimpy Articles  The central governmentThe central government waswas intentionallyintentionally weak.weak.  Why do you think theyWhy do you think they agreed to a weak centralagreed to a weak central government?government?
  • Articles of ConfederationArticles of Confederation  Government Could:Government Could:  Borrow or request moneyBorrow or request money from the statesfrom the states  Declare war and peaceDeclare war and peace  Maintain an army and navyMaintain an army and navy  Make treaties and alliancesMake treaties and alliances with other nationswith other nations  Regulate affairs with NativeRegulate affairs with Native AmericansAmericans  Establish post officesEstablish post offices  Decide certain disputesDecide certain disputes among the statesamong the states  Government Could Not:Government Could Not:  Levy or Collect TaxesLevy or Collect Taxes  Require states to provideRequire states to provide money for running themoney for running the national governmentnational government  Regulate TradeRegulate Trade  Force anyone to abide by theForce anyone to abide by the lawlaw  Amend the Articles withoutAmend the Articles without the consent of all 13 statesthe consent of all 13 states  Establish an executiveEstablish an executive branchbranch  Establish a national courtEstablish a national court
  • Economic Crisis of the 1780sEconomic Crisis of the 1780s  Revolution disrupted theRevolution disrupted the economy.economy.  Britain stopped buyingBritain stopped buying goods.goods.  Revolution put the StatesRevolution put the States into debt.into debt.  People didn’t seePeople didn’t see improvements theyimprovements they expected after the war.expected after the war.  People that loanedPeople that loaned money during the warmoney during the war were not being paid back.were not being paid back.
  • Shays’ RebellionShays’ Rebellion  1786, uprising led by Daniel Shays1786, uprising led by Daniel Shays  Farmers protest against the foreclosures*Farmers protest against the foreclosures* of farmsof farms  SeeSee videovideo 11 andand  SeeSee videovideo 22 *Foreclosure: taking back property that someone has stopped making payments on
  • Quick QuizQuick Quiz  What was the reason for ShaysWhat was the reason for Shays Rebellion?Rebellion?  A) Massachusetts wanted to be its ownA) Massachusetts wanted to be its own country.country.  B) Daniel Shays wanted to take over theB) Daniel Shays wanted to take over the national government.national government.  C) Farmers had trouble growing enoughC) Farmers had trouble growing enough food.food.  D) The country was in an economicD) The country was in an economic depression after the Revolutionary War.depression after the Revolutionary War.
  • Quick QuizQuick Quiz  What did Shays’ Rebellion demonstrateWhat did Shays’ Rebellion demonstrate about the Articles of Confederation?about the Articles of Confederation?  A) The government could handle almostA) The government could handle almost anything.anything.  B) There were lots of misspellings in it.B) There were lots of misspellings in it.  C) The Articles were weak and ineffective.C) The Articles were weak and ineffective.  D) The farmers in the countryside did notD) The farmers in the countryside did not know about the Articles of Confederation.know about the Articles of Confederation.
  • Shays’ RebellionShays’ Rebellion  Shays’ Rebellion was stoppedShays’ Rebellion was stopped  But now the States recognizedBut now the States recognized the weakness of the Articles.the weakness of the Articles.  There was no way for theThere was no way for the government to deal withgovernment to deal with economic problems for theeconomic problems for the country.country. FAI L Daniel Shays Articles of Confederatio n Government FAIL