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Inquiry and Information Fluency Mini Lessons

Brenda Walker Alston
Curation Tools
http://www.netvibes.com/brenbren43#General
www.scoop.it/t/how-to-avoid-plagiarism-by-brenda-alston
http://p...
Life Cycles

Second Grade

Standards:
S2L1. Students will investigate the life cycles of different living organisms.
a. De...
ALA Standards
1.1 Skills
1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process in
seeking knowledge in
curricular subjects,
and make the r...
Essential Questions
How does a living thing go through a life cycle?
• How are life cycles different between organisms?
• ...
Essential Question: How do the seasons affect trees and other plants?
Hook & Attention Getter: If possible, have several w...
Digital Fluency Lesson
This is a mini lesson to be taught before students begin their culminating activity.
The teacher wi...
Lesson on Digital Information Fluency
To prepare students for their Life Cycle projects, the teacher will conduct the foll...
GRASPS
Goal: (a) Student teams will construct an environment that includes the four seasons on using Glogster. With the te...
Category

4

3

2

1

Point of View-Awareness
of Audience

Strong awareness of
audience in the design.

Some awareness of
...
Social Studies- Second Grade
SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in
Georgia his...
ALA Standards
1.3 Responsibilities
1.3.1 Respect copyright/
intellectual property
rights of creators
and producers.
1.3.2 ...
Digital Information Fluency
Locating Information Efficiently
Evaluating information Effectively
Inquiry Principles
Authent...
Lesson Plan: Time Line
Review the life events and contribution of Jimmy Carter.
Students will create a timeline using (Dip...
Using the Promethean Board display, www.thinglink.com/scene/410436081872273409 to give examples of
primary source document...
2. Promote student inquiry.
Encourage students to speculate about each source, its creator, and its context.
●

What was h...
Summative Assessment
“Jimmy Carter and Me!”
~ A Biography and Georgia Studies Project
You are an historian. Your area of e...
Chapter 2: “Jimmy Carter the Leader”
Explain how Jimmy Carter became Georgia’s governor and then President of the United S...
Criteria

Not Yet

Needs
Improvement

Meets
Standards

Exceeds
Standards

Student’s product
explains Jimmy
Carter’s life, ...
Science:Matter
Second Grade
S2P1. Students will investigate the properties of matter and changes that occur in objects.
a....
ALA Standards
1.1 Skills
1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process in
seeking knowledge in
curricular subjects,
and make the r...
Science Lesson: MATTER (Inquiry)

Second Grade

S2P1. Students will investigate the properties of matter and changes that ...
Have students record their predictions in their journal. (Use the program www. Tikatok.com)
Place ice in clear cups on des...
Digital Information Fluency
Before students begin their superhero creations, they will use the internet to locate
informat...
Authenticity
Beginning
The scope of the inquiry
study is determined
mainly by the mandated
curriculum.

Developing

Accomp...
Visit this website for rubrics
http://galileo.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/rubric.pdf
Other assessments include: teacher...
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Mini lessons

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Transcript of "Mini lessons"

  1. 1. Inquiry and Information Fluency Mini Lessons Brenda Walker Alston
  2. 2. Curation Tools http://www.netvibes.com/brenbren43#General www.scoop.it/t/how-to-avoid-plagiarism-by-brenda-alston http://pinterest.com/wifeteacher/mini-lessons/ The lessons for this assignment were taken from the Georgia Department of Education. I made revisions for the purpose of this assignment.
  3. 3. Life Cycles Second Grade Standards: S2L1. Students will investigate the life cycles of different living organisms. a. Determine the sequence of the life cycle of common animals in your area: a mammal such as a cat or dog or classroom pet, a bird such as a chicken, an amphibian such as a frog, and an insect such as a butterfly. b. Relate seasonal changes to observations of how a tree changes throughout a school year. c. Investigate the life cycle of a plant by growing a plant from a seed and by recording changes over a period of time. d. Identify fungi (mushrooms) as living organisms.
  4. 4. ALA Standards 1.1 Skills 1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real world connection for using this process in own life. 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning. 1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding. 1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions. 3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively. 3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
  5. 5. Essential Questions How does a living thing go through a life cycle? • How are life cycles different between organisms? • How does a plant develop from a small seed? • How do seasons affect the life cycles of living things? • How are changes in day/night length related to seasonal changes in plants and animals? Authenticity: Where does this topic live in the world? What will students find relevant about this topic? Understanding: What is worth knowing about this topic? What do you want students to get better at through this task? Performances: Do students have the opportunity to choose the most appropriate way to communicate their findings/understanding? Does the study create a knowledge-building environment where ideas are central and made public?, Does the study involve students sharing and improving their own and each others ideas? Assessment: What will you collect and/or observe as evidence of student understanding? Does this count as evidence of deep understanding of the key learning outcomes? Digital Information Fluency Locating Information Efficiently Evaluating information Effectively Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge, Comprehension,Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation
  6. 6. Essential Question: How do the seasons affect trees and other plants? Hook & Attention Getter: If possible, have several woody tree buds available for your students to observe in the classroom. You should harvest these in the winter or early spring, and they may be kept in zip-lock bags if you wish to store them for the next school year. Distribute the buds to each student or small groups of students. Ask them to record as many observations as possible without telling them what the object is. They should record what they think it is and where they think it came from. After allowing about 10-15 minutes for recording observations, hold a class discussion and reveal that these are buds from a tree, what kind of tree, and its location. (This will prepare them for making observations outdoors.) Description: Students should have the opportunity to observe firsthand the life cycle of a tree in its natural location. Therefore you will need to locate a suitable tree on the school grounds. Have the students choose a branch on a tree to observe in detail. They will record observations and sketch the branch during each of the four seasons. They should also sketch/observe the entire tree as growth may make it difficult to locate the exact same branch over a period of several months. If it is not possible to do this in the school yard, you may need to take digital pictures of a tree at your home or a nearby park. Students may also use digital cameras to record data about a tree in their yard or neighborhood. If your students keep a science journal for the school year, this would be an ideal place to record the observations. They should also sketch the tree at various times throughout the year. (Suggested times for this are August, November, February, and May. This will vary depending on your location. If you are in the far northern or southernmost part of the State, adjust as needed.) This needs to be a tree that is not an evergreen. The tree needs to shed its leaves in the fall and produce new leaves in the spring in order to make the impact needed on student learning. Students will use Google Presentation as their journal. This is an example of an enhanced lesson.
  7. 7. Digital Fluency Lesson This is a mini lesson to be taught before students begin their culminating activity. The teacher will follow the lessons on the following websites: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/my-creative-work-k-2 http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/follow-digital-trail-2-3 The teacher will use the website to introduce the students to internet safety and digital footprints. At this time, I will introduce the terms plagiarism by showing the curated lessons from www.scoop.it/t/how-to-avoid-plagiarism-by-brenda-alston and http://www. netvibes.com/brenbren43#General. Students will determine if the curated lists are primary or secondary sources.
  8. 8. Lesson on Digital Information Fluency To prepare students for their Life Cycle projects, the teacher will conduct the following activity: Students will use the curation tool, life cycle netvibe and determine if the information is accurate. Students will use the CRAP method of questioning: https://www.diigo.com/user/wiredinstructor/evaluation Currency o How recent is the information? o How recently has the website been updated? o Is it current enough for your topic? * Reliability o What kind of information is included in the resource? o Is content of the resource primarily opinion? Is is balanced? o Does the creator provide references or sources for data or quotations? * Authority o Who is the creator or author? o What are the credentials? o Who is the published or sponsor? o Are they reputable? o What is the publisher’s interest (if any) in this information? o Are there advertisements on the website? * Purpose/Point of View o Is this fact or opinion? o Is it biased? o Is the creator/author trying to sell you something?
  9. 9. GRASPS Goal: (a) Student teams will construct an environment that includes the four seasons on using Glogster. With the teachers help, students will create their own curation tools collecting information about life cycles. Students are allowed to select the plants and animals of their choosing. Groups are to selects plants and animals found in the southeast and a region of their choice. At this time the teacher will introduce the CRAP method for evaluating primary sources. (b) Students will construct their glosters depicting the life cycle of their plants and animals depicting the appropriate seasons (for example, resident adult animals would be found throughout the seasons, their young would be found in the spring and show growth during the remaining seasons, whereas migratory birds would appear in spring, have offspring in summer, and leave in fall), plants might be either perennial or annual and certain fungi might be on trees all year around, but others are seasonal) on their glosters. (c) Each student should construct a “What I Have Learned About …” book using Storybook Weaver that accompanies the poster and includes written descriptions (e.g. expository, poems, and/or songs) and sketches for each organism’s life cycle. (d) Students will be able to relate seasonal changes in an environment showing and describing the life cycles of organisms. Role: You will be a team of biologists at a natural history museum. Your task, as teams, is to take design a glogster poster showing changes in seasons and the life cycles of plants, animals, and fungi found in an environment. And, each member of the team will use her/his science journal notes to make a book (using Google Presentation) that accompanies their poster and includes written descriptions (e.g. expository, poems, and/or songs) and sketches for each organism’s life cycle for museum visitors. Deeper Learning Audience: Visitors to your museum. The instructor will use Animoto to create a video. Scenario: Remember to record things you learn about life cycles, seasons, and environments in your Science Journals. Product: You will need to divide your class into teams. Using your science journal notes you should construct a team poster and a personal book for museum visitors to view, read, and learn. Invite visitors to your classroom/school for a tour of your classroom museum. Extension: I have a friend who teaches second grade in Dubai. We will use Skype and construct a field trip representing the plants, animals and seasons typical for this area. Her students will do the same. Children will compare seasons, plants and animals in both areas.
  10. 10. Category 4 3 2 1 Point of View-Awareness of Audience Strong awareness of audience in the design. Some awareness of audience in the design. Some awareness of audience in the design. Students find its difficult to explain how the vocabulary applies Limited awareness of the needs and interests of the target audience. Images Images create a distinct Images create an atmosphere or tone that matches different parts of the story. atmosphere or tone that matches some parts of the story. An attempt was made to use images to create an atmosphere/tone but it needed work. Little or no attempt to use images to create an appropriate atmosphere/tone Duration of Presentation Length of presentation was 4 minutes. Length of presentation was 3 minutes. Length of presentation was 2 minutes. Presentation was less than 2 minutes long or more that 4 minutes. Point of View-Purpose Establishes a purpose early on and maintains a clear focus throughout. Establishes a purpose early on and maintains focus for most of the presentation. There are few lapses in focus, but the purpose is fairly clear. It is difficult to figure out the purpose of the presentation. This is a sample rubric for this assessment.
  11. 11. Social Studies- Second Grade SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in Georgia history. a. Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi, and Mary Musgrove (founding of Georgia); Sequoyah (development of a Cherokee alphabet); Jackie Robinson (sports); Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights); Jimmy Carter (leadership and human rights). b. Describe how everyday life of these historical figures is similar to and different from everyday life in the present (food, clothing, homes, transportation, communication, recreation, rights, and freedoms). Essential Questions: How does Jimmy Carter show compassion for others? How have you shown compassion for others? How did Jimmy Carter try to bring about peace between other countries?
  12. 12. ALA Standards 1.3 Responsibilities 1.3.1 Respect copyright/ intellectual property rights of creators and producers. 1.3.2 Seek divergent perspectives during information gathering and assessment. 1.3.3 Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information. 1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community. 1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly 2.1 Skills 2.1.1 Continue an inquiry based research process by applying critical thinking skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluation, organization) to information and knowledge in order to construct new understandings, draw conclusions, and create new knowledge.
  13. 13. Digital Information Fluency Locating Information Efficiently Evaluating information Effectively Inquiry Principles Authenticity: What will students find relevant about this topic? Deeper Understanding: What is worth knowing about this topic? Performance: Does performance tasks provide opportunities for students to flexibly use and apply understanding, rather than merely practice and repeat it? Assessment: Does this count as evidence of deep understanding of the key learning outcomes? Technology: Locate current information Bloom's Taxonomy: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation
  14. 14. Lesson Plan: Time Line Review the life events and contribution of Jimmy Carter. Students will create a timeline using (Dipity.com) from the time Jimmy Carter was born until today. The students will list at least 10 of the following: accomplishments, jobs, and programs he has led or joined. Students will then make a timeline of their own lives for comparison. Students can use this link to help guide them with their research on President Carter: www.jimmycarter.info/studentresearch_11.html. Students should share their timeline with a partner, and explain why they selected the events that they did, and why those events were important in the life of Jimmy Carter. Using Dipity.com is an example of enhancement.
  15. 15. Using the Promethean Board display, www.thinglink.com/scene/410436081872273409 to give examples of primary source document. The class will go to the media center to locate primary sources on Jimmy Carter. With the Media Specialist's assistance and the information presented below, we will help student decide if their information is credible. Students will also use the curation tools After this activity, students will complete the culminating/assessment. http://www.ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/guide.php?subject=thinking 1. Engage students with primary sources. Draw on students’ prior knowledge of the topic. Ask students to closely observe each primary source. ● Who created this primary source? ● When was it created? ● Where does your eye go first? Help students see key details. ● What do you see that you did not expect? ● What powerful words and ideas are expressed? Encourage students to think about their personal response to the source. ● What feelings and thoughts does the primary source trigger in you? ● What questions does it raise?
  16. 16. 2. Promote student inquiry. Encourage students to speculate about each source, its creator, and its context. ● What was happening during this time period? ● What was the creator’s purpose in making this primary source? ● What does the creator do to get his or her point across? ● What was this primary source’s audience? ● What biases or stereotypes do you see? Ask if this source agrees with other primary sources, or with what the students already know. ● Ask students to test their assumptions about the past. ● Ask students to find other primary or secondary sources that offer support or contradiction. 3. Assess how students apply critical thinking and analysis skills to primary sources. ● Have students summarize what they have learned. ● Ask for reasons and specific evidence to support their conclusions. ● Help students identify questions for further investigation, and develop strategies for how they might answer them.
  17. 17. Summative Assessment “Jimmy Carter and Me!” ~ A Biography and Georgia Studies Project You are an historian. Your area of expertise is Georgia’s influential people—past and present. Your task is to create a biography about one of Georgia’s most influential people: Jimmy Carter. After completion, your work will be presented to other historians and guests, and put on display. Your Biography Your biography will have three chapters or parts. Below is an explanation of what each chapter or part should include. Chapter 1: “Jimmy Carter and Me” Include information about Carter’s life such as: o Where he was born/where he grew up? o What his childhood was like? o What challenges did he and his family experience with scarcity and meeting their needs? Compare your life TODAY with Jimmy Carter’s life when he was your age. Answer the following questions. o How has Georgia changed (transportation, communication, land, population, etc.)? o How has Georgia stayed the same (transportation, communication, land, population, etc.)? o What are some of the SAME chores/games/activities Jimmy did as a kid that you do today? o How is your life today DIFFERENT from Jimmy Carter’s childhood?
  18. 18. Chapter 2: “Jimmy Carter the Leader” Explain how Jimmy Carter became Georgia’s governor and then President of the United States. Talk about the roles, jobs, and responsibilities Jimmy Carter had when he was governor AND when he was President. How were they alike and different? Tell how Jimmy Carter has changed the world in a positive way through his leadership. Chapter 3: “Jimmy Carter…Did you know?” ***This is where you really can be creative, so have fun!*** List ―fun factsǁ about Jimmy Carter List interesting information about Georgia and how it relates to your life Student Presentation (Deeper Learning) You will present your work to other historians (classmates) and guests. Your work will also be put on display. Please be sure to include pictures, artifacts, items, and other representations to bring your biography to life! You may use a variety of resources including, but not limited to the library, the Carter Center, the Internet, and other people (as an interview). You may choose any ONE of these ways to present your work: Newspaper: Make a newspaper biography with articles that talk about the required topics. Time Capsule: Construct a time capsule biography with items and written descriptions related to the required topics. Video: Make a video biography using Animoto or Photostory that discusses required topics. Students are acting as experts, therefore this assessment is extending their knowledge. Other forms of assessments include pretest/posttest/student conferences and teacher observations.
  19. 19. Criteria Not Yet Needs Improvement Meets Standards Exceeds Standards Student’s product explains Jimmy Carter’s life, and how scarcity affected his family. The student’s explanation of Jimmy Carter’s life is incorrect and the comparison of past and present scarcity problems is incorrect The student identifies where Jimmy Carter was born and where he grew up, explains what his childhood was like, and explains the challenges that he and his family experienced with scarcity, but is unable to compare Jimmy’s scarcity problem with modern scarcity problems. The student identifies where Jimmy Carter was born and where he grew up, explains what his childhood was like, and explains the challenges that he and his family experienced with scarcity and compares the scarcity problem with modern scarcity problems. The student correctly identifies and explains Jimmy Carter’s life, challenges with scarcity, and compares past and modern scarcity issues, and identifies ways that both the student and Jimmy Carter overcame adversity. Student compares his/her life today with Jimmy Carter’s life. The student accurately compares two or fewer of the following areas with Jimmy Carter’s life: transportation, communication, land, and population. The student accurately compares three of the following areas with Jimmy Carter’s life: transportation, communication, land, and population The student compares modern transportation, communication, land, and population with that of the past and compares their life with that of Jimmy Carter. The student compares modern times with that of the past and compares their life with Jimmy Carter’s life and identifies several specific ways that change has affected President Carter’s life and choices. Student’s product discusses Jimmy Carter’s leadership roles as Governor and President, and discusses the differences in those two position The student’s explanation of Jimmy Carter as Governor and/or President is incorrect, as is the student’s explanation of the differences between those two The student discusses some part of how Jimmy Carter became Governor and President, but doesn’t compare and contrast the roles of the president and the governor. The student discusses how Jimmy Carter became Governor and President by comparing and contrasting the roles of the president and governor. The student correctly discusses Jimmy Carter’s roles as President and Governor by comparing and contrasting those roles, and discusses examples of how he changed the world in a positive way The student lists at least five fun facts, but not all of those facts are connected to the student’s life. The student lists more than five fun facts and all of the information is connected to the student’s life. The student lists more than five fun facts and connects all of those facts to his/her life. positions Student’s product shares accurate facts about Jimmy Carter and connects those facts to the student’s life. . The student’s product shares fewer than five facts and the information is not connected to the student’s life.
  20. 20. Science:Matter Second Grade S2P1. Students will investigate the properties of matter and changes that occur in objects. a. Identify the three common states of matter as solid, liquid, or gas. b. Investigate changes in objects by tearing, dissolving, melting, squeezing, etc Essential Questions: How can matter be changed? • What are the properties of matter? • How do we classify matter? • How do we describe matter? • How do changes affect matter? • What are some of the ways matter can change? • How can water be a solid, liquid, and a gas? Authentic Questions: Where does this topic live in the world? What will students find relevant about this topic? Understanding: What is worth knowing about this topic? What do you want students to get better at through this task? Performances of Learning: How might technology be used to capture student learning and make it visible within and beyond the classroom? How might technology facilitate the sharing and improvement of student ideas? Digital Information Fluency: Locating Information Efficiently What information am I looking for? Evaluating Information-Effectively using Information ethically? Bloom's Taxonomy- Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation
  21. 21. ALA Standards 1.1 Skills 1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real world connection for using this process in own life. 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning. 1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding. 1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer 3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
  22. 22. Science Lesson: MATTER (Inquiry) Second Grade S2P1. Students will investigate the properties of matter and changes that occur in objects. a. Identify the three common states of matter as solid, liquid, or gas. b. Investigate changes in objects by tearing, dissolving, melting, squeezing, etc. Essential Questions: How can matter be changed? • What are the properties of matter? • How do we classify matter? • How do we describe matter? • How do changes affect matter? • What are some of the ways matter can change? • How can water be a solid, liquid, and a gas? Discussion, Suggestions for use: Have students answer the questions below in their journal, using words and/or pictures. Allow students to explain their answers verbally. 1. How can we make water change from water to ice? 2. How can we make water change from ice to water? 3. Give two examples of where you would see water changing back and forth from one state to another? 4. Do you think the water would ever stop changing states? Why or why not? Description: (Inquiry Lesson); Enhancement Allow students to work in groups of two or three. Provide each group of students with a clear plastic cup containing pieces of ice. Guide groups through observations with the ice. Encourage students to record their observations in their science journal. Teacher guiding questions: “What is in the cup? Describe the ice. What does it look like? Feel like? What is the ice made of? How is ice made?” Next, pour the ice into containers of different sizes and shapes. “How does the ice look now? Is it the same or different? Has the shape of the ice changed? Why do you think that is?” Have students record their observations in their science journal. Encourage students to illustrate their observations in their science journal. Have students predict what will happen if we leave the ice out on the desk/table? Why? How do you know? How long might this take?
  23. 23. Have students record their predictions in their journal. (Use the program www. Tikatok.com) Place ice in clear cups on desks. Allow ice to naturally change state. While the change is occurring you may wish to read a read aloud such as Amazing Water by Melvin Berger, or I am Water by Jean Marzollo, or other water related titles from your media center. Stop and make observations on the progress of the ice every 3-5 minutes. When the ice has completely melted, allow students to draw “before and after” pictures of it in their journal. Ask guiding questions for the students to discuss in their groups. “What happened to the ice? Why? What’s in the cup? How is it like the ice? How is it different from the ice? Describe the water. What does it look like? Feel like?” Encourage students to record their observations in their journals. Pour the water into containers of different sizes and shapes. Ask the same questions as before. Allow students to complete a Venn diagram to compare and contrast ice and water when poured into containers of different shapes and sizes. “Can you think of something else that will take the shape of the container?” Record a list of student generated responses on the board, chart, or in their journals. Ask students, “Is there any what that we could change this water back into ice? How long might this take?” Solicit student responses. Return the water to the freezer. If possible, allow student to check the water at regular intervals. Assessment GRASPS (Deeper Learning); Use www.Toondoo.com to create a comic strip Goal:Create a Superhero or heroine who is able to change matter using their superpowers Role:Comic strip writer Audience: Students who read comic books. Scenario: Superheroes have special powers. The students will use their knowledge of how matter can be changed to create a superhero or heroine with special powers such as freezing, squeezing, melting, tearing, dissolving, etc… Use Superhero planning sheet. Product: Students will create a comic strip showcasing the unique power of the superhero/heroine the students designed. Students will include details of how the superpower is used to change three different types of matter.
  24. 24. Digital Information Fluency Before students begin their superhero creations, they will use the internet to locate information about the 3 states of matter. The teacher will review the questions below to help students locate accurate information. http://21cif.com/wsi/index.html Is the author qualified to write on the subject? Does the publisher stand behind the information that is published? Is the information too old to trust? Is the information biased or objective? Do experts respect the information? What clues do links provide? Is the information accurate? Does the evidence support an author's claim? Display, the curation tool, http://pinterest.com/wifeteacher/mini-lessons/ and discuss digital information fluency and higher order thinking and web 2.0 tools.
  25. 25. Authenticity Beginning The scope of the inquiry study is determined mainly by the mandated curriculum. Developing Accomplished Students’ interests and concerns influence the scope of the inquiry study The inquiry study emanates from a question, problem, issue or exploration that is significant to the disciplines, builds connections outside of the school and is mapped to the mandated curriculum. Students have significant influence and input in determining the scope of the study Other adults outside the school are intrigued by the assignments or activities or tasks students are asked to do and can find ways to contribute to it. An adult working within the discipline or in the community might actually tackle the question, problem or exploration posed by the assignments or activities The inquiry study originates with and only meets programs of study expectations. The inquiry study originates with the program of studies but provides some opportunities to extend beyond curriculum expectations. The inquiry study originates with an issue, problem, question or exploration that provides opportunities to create or produce something that contributes to knowledge The assignments or activities or tasks within the study contain few roles that reflect a single perspective. The assignments or activities or tasks within the study contain some separate roles that reflect few perspectives The assignments or activities or tasks within the study require a complex array of roles and diverse perspectives. The assignments or activities or tasks students do within the study would not likely be tackled outside a school setting or tasks.
  26. 26. Visit this website for rubrics http://galileo.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/rubric.pdf Other assessments include: teacher/students conferences, observations, pretest/post tests
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