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Roadside Safety Management
 

Roadside Safety Management

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Highlight the importance of Roadside Safety & the appropriate Safety Treatment

Highlight the importance of Roadside Safety & the appropriate Safety Treatment

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    Roadside Safety Management Roadside Safety Management Presentation Transcript

    • Roadside Safety Management The Safe Roadside Concept Gallant Chan Transportation Engineer
    • Deaths + Hospitalisations resulting from road crashes in Auckland Region
    • International Comparison of Deaths per 100,000 Population (2007) *Auckland Regional Road Safety Plan 2009/12
    • Vehicle Crashes
          • During 2008, an average of 1 person was killed on New Zealand roadways each day.
          • Although there was a general down trend on road deaths, there is still a lot more to do to meet our Regional Road Safety Target.
    • New Zealand Single Vehicle Run Off Road Fatalities *Ministry of Transport
    • What happens if vehicle run off road and hit a roadside hazard? *http://www.blackwoodfire.org/pictures/11_23_06/IMG_1191.jpg
    • What happens if vehicle run off road and hit a roadside hazard? * Johnson City, Tennessee. http://www.car-accidents.com/pages/2005-accident_story/5-14-05-bad-crash-2.html
    • What happens if vehicle run off road and hit a roadside hazard? * http://westseattleblog.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/truckvfence.jpg
    • What happens if vehicle run off road and hit a roadside hazard?
      • Some older and superseded terminal can be a dangerous hazard as well.
    • Most Frequently Objects Struck in 2006 *New Zealand Transport Agency
    • What’s the GOAL?
          • Ideally keep vehicles on the road; or
          • At worst reduce crash severity if they do come off the road.
    • Roadside Safety Priorities
          • Remove
          • Relocate
          • Redesign (reduce impact severity)
          • Redirect (shield)
          • Retro-reflect (delineate)
    • Roadside Safety Priorities - Remove * New Zealand Transport Agency Before
    • Roadside Safety Priorities - Remove After * New Zealand Transport Agency
    • Roadside Safety Priorities - Relocate Potentially to relocate underground * New Zealand Transport Agency
    • Roadside Safety Priorities - Redesign * New Zealand Transport Agency Redesigned so the culvert does not trap vehicle tire
    • Roadside Safety Priorities - Redirect * New Zealand Transport Agency Redirect vehicle from hitting a hazard
    • Roadside Safety Priorities - Retroreflect * http://transportationfortomorrow.org/final_report/volume_3_html/05_field_hearings/images/0407_minneapolis_test_bio_lair_img_0.jpg Introduce retro reflectivity to enhance the awareness of objects/messages to drivers
    • Clear Zone Concept
      • Clear Zone
      • The clear zone is the room available for vehicles that run off the road to regain control with minimum damage to both vehicles and occupants.
      • Measured from the edge line adjacent traffic lane including shoulder and other widths to the hazards.
      • Provide as much unobstructed roadside area as possible.
    • Standards for Roadside Safety * New Zealand Transport Agency Poor Roadside
    • Evolution of Clear Zone Concept
      • 9m clear zone introduced during 1967
      • Variable clear zone introduced during 1977
    • Variable Clear Zone
      • Traffic Volumes
      • Design Speed
      • Cut and Fill Slopes
      • Horizontal Curve
    • Type of Barriers and Terminals
      • Type of Barriers
      • Flexible – Wire Rope
      • Semi rigid – W-beam, & Thrie-beam
      • Rigid – New Jersey, & F shape concrete
      • Type of Terminals
      • Non-redirective – absorb energy
      • Redirective gating – controlled penetration
      • Redirective non-gating – roll up & smoothly redirective
    • Flexible Barriers
      • Wire Rope (TL-3)
      • Most forgiving on vehicle occupants
      • Least Visually Intrusive
      • Greatest Deflection (1.25m – 2.7m)
      Armorwire Safence * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems
    • Flexible Barriers * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems
    • Semi-Rigid Barriers
      • W-Beam, Thrie-Beam, & Nu-Guard (TL-3/TL-4)
      • Moderately forgiving on vehicle occupants
      • Moderate Deflection (approx. 1.0m)
      W-Beam Thrie-Beam * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems Nu-Guard
    • Semi-Rigid Barriers * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems W-Beam Nu-Guard
    • Rigid Barriers
      • Concrete (TL-3 to TL-6)
      • Most commonly used in Medians and on Bridges
      • Least Forgiving
      • No Deflection
      F-Shape F-Shape * http://www.ellsworthlooproad.com/; CSP Pacific Roadside Systems New Jersey
    • Rigid Barriers New Jersey Concrete Barrier
    • End Terminals Tangential Terminal Flared Terminal
    • End Terminals ET-2000 (Tangential energy absorbing gating terminal) Fleat 350 (Flared energy absorbing terminal) * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems; Road Systems Inc. X-350 (Fully re-directive terminal; Flared or tangential) SKT (Tangential energy absorbing terminal)
    • End Terminals X-350 End Terminal * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems
    • Crash Cushions Universal TAU II (Fully re-directive crash cushion) * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems; Road Systems Inc. TRACC (Attenuating Crash Cushion) Quadguard
    • Crash Cushions Universal TAU-II Head On * CSP Pacific Roadside Systems Universal TAU-II Side Impact
    • Transitions
      • Provided between barriers of different stiffness to prevent pocketing
    • Transitions * New Zealand Transport Agency
    • Some things to consider for Barrier Installation
      • THIS LIST DOES NOT COVER ALL ISSUES TO BE CONSIDERED. COME TO SEE THE TRAFFIC SERVICES TEAM IF YOU ARE THINKING TO INSTALL SOME BARRIERS.
      • Location of Hazards
      • Is the hazard within Clear Zone?
      • Note: Barriers are hazard as well, however well designed complying barriers can reduce crash severity.
      • Lateral Offset / Shy line Offset
      • Desirable to place all roadside features beyond the shy line offset
      • Offsets ≥100km/hr:
        • LHS = provide 3.0m
        • RHS = 2.0m
    • Things to consider for Barrier Installation
      • Terrain
      • Investigate likelihood vehicle would be on the ground, falling, or launching when hitting roadside features.
      • Ditch and Back Slopes (Clear Zone requirement).
      • Length of Need
      • Start beyond the tangential runout path to prevent errant vehicles from travelling behind the barrier and hit the hazard.
      • Flare barrier to reduce length of need.
    • Things to consider for Barrier Installation
      • Accesses and Intersections
      • Check the sight visibility of drivers turning out of accesses.
      • Type of Barriers and Terminals
      • Assess the Test Level (TL) requirement.
      • Minimum TL on State Highway is NCHRP 350 TL-3.
      • Barrier Deflection
      • Assess Barrier Deflection to hazards.
      • Maintenance Access
      • Allow maintenance access.
    • Length of Need Barrier Installation Example
    • Standards for Roadside Safety * New Zealand Transport Agency
      • Standards
      • NZTA State Highway Geometric Design Manual
      • NZTA Bridge Manual
      • NHI Highway Safety Features Workshop Course Notes
      • NCHRP Reports 350
      • AS/NZS 3845:1999
      • TNZ M23
    • Introduction to Roadside Safety The End