Why Tweet? Handout

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Supplementary handout for the Washington University Libraries class called Why Tweet? Learn How Twitter can Help YOU! on March 18, 2010.

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Why Tweet? Handout

  1. 1. 
 
 
 
 key terms  tweet  • An
individual
message
is
called
a
tweet.

 • Can
be
used
as
a
verb:
“I
tweeted
about
the
stimulus
package
 this
morning.”
Alternative
is
“twittering.”
 • Alternatives
include
“post,”
“message”
and
“update.”
 
 follower or following  • Follow
other
people
and
companies
to
receive
their
tweets
as
 they
post.

 
 • Conversely,
people
get
your
messages
by
following
you.
 @username (at reply)  • Send
public
messages
to
people
by
beginning
with
 @username.
 • If
the
user
is
following
your
account,
your
message
will
appear
 directly
on
his
Twitter
home
page.
(If
not,
your
message
will
 appear
in
his
@username
mentions
folder.)
 
Sample:
@WUSTLlibraries
Thanks
for
the
great
twitter
class!


 
 RT @username (retweet)   • Retweeting
(RT)
is
reposting
people’s
tweets
and
giving
them
 credit.

 • To
retweet,
begin
with
RT
and
@reply
to
the
tweet’s
source.
 • Retweeting
is
common
and
a
form
of
conversation
on
Twitter.

 • Used
to
spread
messages
and
ideas
across
Twitter
quickly.
 
 Sample:
RT
@WUSTLNSS
Campus
Electric
Outage
 http://nss.wustl.edu/node/314
 1
 
 
 hy
Tweet?
Learn
How
Twitter
Can
Help
YOU!
|
©2010
Washington
University
Libraries
 W 

  2. 2. d username (direct message or DM)  
 • Direct
messages
(DMs)
are
private
–
only
the
sender
and
 receiver
can
see
them.

 • DMs
are
on
your
home
page
under
the
Direct
Messages
tab
 • Can
only
DM
people
who
are
following
you.
Conversely,
you
 can
receive
them
only
from
people
you’re
following.
 • Send
Direct
Messages
by
using
the
pull‐down
menu
to
choose
 
 a
recipient
and
then
typing
in
your
note.

 • Send
a
DM
by
starting
your
message
with
“d
username”
 Tip: If you’re communicating about  Sample:
d
WUSTLlibraries
I’d
like
to
schedule
a
meeting
in
the
 something potentially sensitive, switch  Café
next
Tue
at
10am
 to DM or email. Remember, @mentions  
 are public, so anyone can see them.  
 #tag (hash tag)  • Hashtags
are
the
way
to
group
and
organize
tweets
from
 multiple
people.
 • Searches
for
a
hashtag
result
in
all
of
the
related
messages.
 • Hashtags
are
the
#
symbol
followed
by
a
term
describing
or
 naming
the
topic.
 • If
enough
people
use
the
same
hashtag
at
once,
the
term
will
 appear
in
Twitter’s
Trending
Topics.
 
 • Conferences
and
events
frequently
have
hashtags
associated
 with
them
(like
#TED).
 Sample:
Are
you
reading
Zahra's
Paradise?
You
should
be.
 http://www.zahrasparadise.com/
#iranelection
 Shortened urls  • URLs
use
up
many
of
the
140
allowed
characters
 • Links
posted
on
Twitter
via
the
website
are
automatically
 shortened.
 • Many
services
take
regular
links
and
shrink
them
down
to
a
 
 manageable
length
and
even
let
you
track
clicks.
 Samples:
bit.ly,
tinyurl.com,
ow.ly,
tr.im,
su.pr
 2
 
 
 hy
Tweet?
Learn
How
Twitter
Can
Help
YOU!
|
©2010
Washington
University
Libraries
 W 

  3. 3. Lists  • Twitter
Lists
are
created
and
maintained
by
Twitter
users.

 • You
can
create
your
own
or
follow
lists
created
by
others.
 • It
can
be
overwhelming
to
follow
everyone
in
one
timeline.
 • A
way
to
organize
feeds
you
want
to
follow:
 o follow
people
without
adding
them
to
your
home
page
 o follow
topics
instead
of
individuals
 • When
looking
at
a
user’s
profile,
click
on
the
Lists
icon
to
add
 
 them
to
a
list.

 • Listorious
is
a
directory
of
Twitter
lists.
 Trending topics  • The
most‐mentioned
terms
on
Twitter
at
that
moment.

 • Continuously
update,
reflecting
the
real‐time
nature
of
Twitter
 and
true
shifts
in
people’s
attention.

 • Trending
Topics
aggregate
many
tweets
at
once
and
often
 break
news
ahead
of
the
mainstream
media.
 • Trends
often
include
hashtags.
 • Can
view
what
is
trending
worldwide
or
in
various
countries
or
 cities.
 
 Searching  • Search
for
people
using
the
Find
People
Link.
 • Search
for
topics
from
your
home
page.
 • No
advanced
search
features
‐
all
search
is
done
via
#tag
or
 keyword.

It’s
not
very
sophisticated
but
it
can
get
the
job
 done.

 
 • Google
does
some
twitter
searching
but
it
is
very
new,
 methods
and
quality
are
uncertain.
 
 
 
 
 Sources  
“The
Simple
Twitter
Book
|
Brent
Ozar
‐
Too
Much
Information,”
http://www.brentozar.com/twitter/book/.

 “Twitter
101
—
Learning
the
lingo,”
http://business.twitter.com/twitter101/learning.
 3
 
 
 hy
Tweet?
Learn
How
Twitter
Can
Help
YOU!
|
©2010
Washington
University
Libraries
 W 

  4. 4. 
 

 Key Uses  Twitter for Current Awareness  • Twitter
is
a
primary
source
document
 • #Iranelection
 • Trending
Topics
 • Searching
 Microblogging  • Examples:
@mcleod,
@kinggary

 • Why
microblog?
 • How
to
become
a
tweeter
of
note
 • Scott
McLeod,
Associate
Professor
at
Iowa
State
University,
focuses
on
educational
technology
for
 administrators
 • Gary
King,
Harvard
Professor,
social
scientist
and
statistician

 • List
of
other
academic
tweeters:
http://www.twitter.com/andrewcallahan/academics
 Teaching with Twitter  • Twitter
Etiquette
 o Privacy
‐
Make
sure
that
if
someone
contacts
you
in
private
that
you
respond
in
kind
(via
DM)
 o Query
‐
Post
questions
on
a
regular
basis
to
start
a
discussion
that
may
not
only
continue
on
twitter
but
 also
be
incorporated
into
class
or
subsection
discussions.
 o Frequency
‐
Tweeting
regularly
is
important
but
you
also
don’t
want
to
tweet
too
much.
Questions
and
 links
are
staples
of
many
of
the
most
interesting
twitter
accounts.
 o Be
prepared
to
be
kind
and
to
have
unkind
things
said
about
you
 Teaching with Twitter  • Create
multiple
accounts
 • Creating
a
community
 o Create
a
hashtag
for
your
class
(#WUSTLANTH4243)
 o Continue
classroom
chatter
 o Create
multiple
accounts
 4
 
 
 hy
Tweet?
Learn
How
Twitter
Can
Help
YOU!
|
©2010
Washington
University
Libraries
 W 

  5. 5.  If
using
twitter
in
the
classroom
you
will
likely
want
to
have
different
twitter
accounts
for
your
 different
classes
  Don’t
use
twitter
website
to
monitor
multiple
accounts,
use
Co‐Tweet,
TweetDeck
or
other
client
 • Scholarly
Community
 o Follow
others
in
your
field.

Then
follow
libraries,
conferences,
publishers,
news
sources.


 o To
get
the
community
going
ask
questions,
start
discussions,
and
use
#tags.
Hashtags
will
let
people
 stumble
upon
your
conversations.
 o At
conferences,
have
tweetups,
which
are
meet
ups
of
twitter
users.


 Teaching with Twitter  • Assignment
Ideas
 o Summarize
–
an
article
in
140
characters
or
tweet
a
thesis
statement.
 o Word
usage
‐
use
the
search
feature
to
have
students
follow
the
usage
of
a
word
throughout
the
day.
 o Public
Timeline
and
Trending
Topics
‐
What
is
the
world
talking
about?
Also,
look
at
how
people,
who
 may
not
know
each
other
in
daily
life,
interact
with
each
other
in
the
Twitterverse.
 o Follow
a
Professional
‐
Have
your
students
follow
one
of
interest
and
report
what
was
learned.
 o Recreate
history
‐
Students
assume
roles
and
then
tweet
based
upon
primary
source
documents.
An
 interesting
and
fun
way
to
look
at
historical
events.
See
http://twhistory.org/
 Questions? Comments?  http://libguides.wustl.edu/twitter
 http://twitter.com/wustllibraries

 http://twitter.com/jaleh_f

 http://twitter.com/b_marston


 
 5
 
 
 hy
Tweet?
Learn
How
Twitter
Can
Help
YOU!
|
©2010
Washington
University
Libraries
 W 


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