Office 2007 Survival Guide

475 views
424 views

Published on

From a workshop series offered in Fall 2007.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
475
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Office 2007 Survival Guide

  1. 1.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 1 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    Microsoft Office 2007 Survival Guide  As of June 2007 the Olin Library Arc has transferred over to Microsoft Office 2007. This newest version  of Office has undergone some significant interface changes that may be confusing to those who are  more familiar with the 2003 version of Office. Hopefully this course, along with this guide, will help you  to smoothly transition over to the new 2007 format and allow you to continue to get your work done  without too much added stress.  The Applications  Microsoft Office 2007 contains revamped versions of all the previous Office suite programs as well as a  number of new applications which we will briefly mention. However, there is not enough time in this  class to give an extensive explanation of each program and their many functions. Instead we will be  focusing in on the three most commonly used programs: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. If you are  interested in learning more about any of the other programs, there are many excellent resources on the  web which you can easily search out.    Access – Database management program  Excel – Spreadsheet and charting program  Groove – Collaborative workspace and file sharing program  InfoPath – Form creation and filing program  OneNote – Note taking program  Outlook – E‐mail and scheduling program  PowerPoint – Presentation creation program  Publisher – Document editor for print and web  Word – Word processing program    IMPORTANT NOTE: The new Office 2007 programs all have new file formats that are not backwards  compatible with the Office 2003 programs. You will be able to open Office 2003 files in the 2007  programs and you can save files in a “97‐2003” format that is compatible, but files saved in the 2007  file format will not open in Office 2003 without first being converted. Please be mindful of this when  saving.  Interface changes  The most startling change to the user interface (UI) in the new Office 2007 System is the removal of the  standard file bar used in almost every standard Windows programs. The tools that used to be found in  this part of the application have all been moved to tabs along the “ribbon” that spans the top of the  application above the document. Although most of the tools you are used to can be found as buttons on  the ribbon, others more advanced controls are still found in dialog boxes. If you cannot seem to find a  tool you are looking for, try clicking on the small arrow in the bottom left corner of the group most  closely related to that tool or setting to see more advanced controls.    
  2. 2.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 2 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    New Documents, Opening, Saving, Printing, Exiting  The Office Logo Button  All the most important basic functions that used to be under the File menu in Office 2003  have been moved to the Office Logo Button in Office 2007. To gain access to New Document,  Open, Save, Print, and Exit Word simply click on the Office Logo and a drop down menu will  appear.  PLEASE NOTE: Double clicking the Office logo will close the program and if you accidentally  hit “No” when the prompt asks you if you want to save your work you will lose all unsaved  changes to the document.    Saving for Compatibility with Office 97‐2003  First Run the Compatibility Checker  1.  Click on the Office Logo Button  2.  Select: “Prepare > Run Compatibility Checker”  3.  A dialog box will appear displaying any  compatibility issues.   4.  Click “OK” in the dialog box, and then address  any compatibility issues.    Then Save the File  To save a file to be opened on a computer still utilizing an earlier version of Office: 1. Click on the  Office Icon. 2. Go to “Save As” 3. Click on the drop down menu labeled “Save as type:” 4. Select the  97‐2003 format, ex. “Word 97‐2003 Document (*.doc) 5. Save the file.      Converting Files to 2007 Format  When you open a document created in a previous version of an  Office 2007 program “Compatibility Mode” is turned on. Although  you will be able to Open, Edit, and Save this file in the 2007 version,  you will not be able to use any of the new features of the 2007  version until you convert the .doc file to a .docx file.    To Convert the .doc to .docx  1.  Click on the Office Logo Button  2.  Click on Convert  3.  Click the “OK” button when the Dialog Box appears 
  3. 3.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 3 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    The Suite as a Whole  What you will find in using Microsoft Office Suite is that the same tools and functions appear throughout  the different programs. Because of this, you will find that many of the different functions explained in  conjunction with a specific program in this tutorial will inform your use of other applications contained  within the Office 2007 Suite.  Word 2007 Microsoft Word is Microsoft’s flagship word processing software and the most commonly used word  processor worldwide and many of the tools for manipulating text in the other Office Suite programs are  taken directly from it, hence it will be the first thing covered in this tutorial.  Home: Fonts, Alignment, Spacing, Styles, Editing  The Home tab contains all the controls for Fonts, Alignment, Spacing, Styles and Editing. If you cannot  seem to find a specific control relating to one of these topics on the ribbon it will most likely be in a pop‐ out box that you can access by clicking on the small arrow in the bottom left corner of each box. (NOTE:  the small arrows on the bottom left corner of each box are a universal feature in the Office Suite, always  check them for tools you cannot otherwise find on the ribbon)    The Font Group  In Word 2007 the default font settings have changed from Times  New Roman 12pt font to Calibri (Body) 11pt font. However, all the  standard tools for modifying text have remained much the same  and can be found in the “Font” group on the Home tab of the  ribbon  The Paragraph Group  In Word 2007 the default spacing settings have changed from the standard  single spacing between lines to a spacing of 1.15, which looks much closer  to double spacing. However, many of the buttons in the paragraph group  remain similar and the spacing can be easily adjusted back to the 97‐2003  default by clicking on the Style labeled “No Spacing” in the Style group of  the Home Tab.   
  4. 4.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 4 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    The Styles Group  New to Word 2007 are the ready‐made quick styles. These  styles can be used to quickly jump between different text  formats within a document. Within each style set there are  a number of distinct styles that can be applied. By clicking  on the “Change Styles” button you can toggle between  different Style Sets, Colors, and Fonts; adjusting all of the  Styles you have used within the document. If you would like your document to look more like it would  have in older versions of Office, you can select the style set “Word 2003.”   Insert: Pictures, Tables, Page Numbers, Headers/Footers, etc.  The Insert tab contains all the controls for inserting Pictures, Clip Art, Tables, Equations, Cover Pages,  and Links, as well as Headers/Footers and Page Numbers. If you cannot seem to find a specific control  relating to one of these topics on the ribbon it will most likely be in a pop‐out box that you can access by  clicking on the small arrow in the bottom left corner of each box.  PLEASE NOTE: After inserting either a Table or a Picture into your word document extra tabs on the  ribbon will appear to give you access to tools specific to those items.  These tabs can be located at the rightmost end of the ribbon.  Inserting a Table  1.  Click on the “Table” button on the ribbon.  2.  Option A: Select the number of rows and columns using the grid  provided in the dropdown menu  Option B: Click on “Insert Table” and enter them into the  resulting dialog box  Option C: Click on “Draw Table” and use the drawing tool to  manually draw the table  Option D: Scroll over “Quick Tables” and select one of the  preformatted table styles supplied by Word      Inserting Illustrations     In Word 2007 controls for inserting and manipulating image files  and other kinds of illustrations have been greatly improved. After  inserting either a Table or a Picture into your word document  extra tabs on the end of the ribbon will appear to give you access  to tools specific to those items.     
  5. 5.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 5 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007      Positioning Illustrations  There are many new controls for modifying illustrations within Word 2007,  and therefore we cannot cover them all in this tutorial. Instead we will  cover the most basic feature for working with illustrations within Word,  Positioning.    1.  After inserting the illustration click on the “Format” tab  2.  Click the “Position” button in the “Arrange” group  3.  Select the kind of positioning closest to your desired position  4.  Manually move the illustration into the final position by either clicking  and dragging or by selecting the illustration and moving it with the  arrow keys  5.  For further control click on “More Layout Options…”  Page Layout  The  Page  Layout  tab  contains  all  the  controls  for  setting  Themes,  Page  Margins,  Page  Orientation,  Columns, and Indentation and Spacing Settings.     Page Setup  The Page Setup group on the Page Layout tab of the ribbon contains  all the important controls for the universal attributes of the  document such as orientation, margins, etc. It is important to note  that the default margins have changed from the 2003 standard  but can be quickly set back.    To Set the Margins Back to the 2003 Default  1.  Click the “Margins” button in the “Page Setup” group  2.  Select “Office 2003 Default” From the drop down menu     
  6. 6.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 6 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    Reference  The Reference tab on the ribbon contains most of the functions specific to academic papers such as  Citations, Footnotes, Endnotes, Table of Contents, and Captions. Unfortunately there is not enough  time in this class to go through all the nuances of the controls for the tools on the Reference tab, if you  would like to learn more feel free to look at our “Word Class Guide.”    Other Noteworthy Things  Spelling & Grammar Check  The Spelling & Grammar Check tool, like all of the other review tools, has been moved onto the Review  tab of the ribbon and functions much in the same way as it always has.     Document Views & Print Preview  All the tools for altering the way you view your document have been moved onto the View tab of the  ribbon, however this is not how you access Print Preview. Print Preview can be found in the Office Logo  Button menu, under the Print option or can be added to the Quick Access Toolbar.    Undo & Redo  Undo & Redo can both be found on the Quick Access Toolbar, however  knowing the hotkeys for them will make working in any application much  more efficient so it is worth putting in the effort.    Undo Ctrl+Z  Redo Ctrl+Y    Excel 2007 Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet application which features calculation and graphing tools that allow the  users to utilize and manipulate data entered into the program. In this section of the class we will give a  brief overview of some of the basics of working in Excel and will point out some of its more advanced  features.    Basics  Workbook vs. Worksheet   Workbook is the entire document, and it contains  several worksheets.  It’s like a journal – the entire  journal is the workbook, but each page is like a  worksheet.      
  7. 7.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 7 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    Text wrap   Text wrapping allows you to fit text on several lines within a single cell without having to do messy  formatting.  Once the text has been entered, right click the cell and select “Format Cells.”  Then  choose the “Alignment” tab where, about halfway down, you will see “Wrap text.”  Click the box next  to “Wrap text” and select okay.  The cell will still be as wide as the other cells in the column but not be  much taller.    Inserting Data   Click on the cell and enter the desired information.    Rows and Columns  Changing width and height   Drag along the line between the row number or column letter.  Double‐click and Excel will  automatically size all the cells to the size of the cell with the most characters.    Inserting or removing   To insert a row, right click on a row number and select “Insert”; a row will be inserted directly above  the selected number.  To insert a column, right click on a column letter and select “Insert”; a column  will be inserted directly above the selected number.  To remove a row or column, right‐click the row  or column to be removed and select “Delete.”    Sorting   If you only want to sort a single row or column, select that row/column by right‐clicking on the header  to select the row/column; then, navigate to the Data ribbon and select sort ascending or descending.   But if one column is tied to another, e.g. you are making mailing labels and want to sort by last name,  you need to select the entire document and then choose by which row or column you want to sort.   Select the entire document by clicking the cell in between Cell 1 and Cell A, then repeat as above.    Calculations and Graphing   Simple formulas   To make a formula, you need already existing data.  To enter a formula, select the desired cell and  then go to the function bar up top.  Each formula must start with an equal sign, and each cell must be  entered with the column letter followed by the row number.  Alternatively, you can click on each cell  to input it into the formula.  To multiply, use the asterisk sign (Shift+8), and to divide, use the  backslash.  If Excel thinks you made a mistake or cannot read the formula, a dialog box will appear  suggesting a change.  For example, a formula might look like = (A1*A2)/(B1+B2)          Using functions   Excel is really powerful and has a lot of functions, especially for finances and more basic mathematics.   If you not sure exactly what you are looking for, click on the f(x) icon next to the formula bar.  Then, type  a description or name of the function, and Excel will return a list of what it thinks you are looking for.  It 
  8. 8.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 8 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    will then instruct you on how to make a formula for that function.  This is the easiest way to find  formulas or perform more complicated calculations.      Inserting Charts  Pie – Go to the Insert ribbon, select the pie chart icon, and choose which style you want.  A Chart Tools  super ribbon with sub‐ribbons for design, layout, and format.  Under the design ribbon, go to  “Select Data” and highlight the range of cells you want in the chart; they do not have to already be  in percentage terms.  This goes into the “Chart Data Range” field; in that same window, you can  name the chart.  To make a formatting change, double‐click towards the center of the pie‐chart.      Bar – What normal humans think of as bar charts, Microsoft engineers call Column Charts.  This is also  found on the Insert ribbon.  “Legend entries” corresponds to the Y‐Axis and Horizontal Axis Labels  is the X‐Axis.       Line graph – Different name, same process as the above two.   Area charts are very similar but look a  little cooler since they shade in the difference between several data sets (lines) at the same time.  Statistical Analysis  Use SPSS if possible   The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences is designed specifically to analyze large amounts of data.   It does not use formulas, but if you’re using Excel for data entry, it will be easier in the long‐run to  learn and use SPSS.    Filtering data   Filtering data is useful when you have a large amount of data but only want to analyze one  characteristic.  Select the range of data to be filtered, go to the Data ribbon, and click on the Filter  button.  A series of drop‐down menus appears on each cell of the top, and clicking gives a list of  options.  If you are sorting a column, it will keep the rows linked together so as to not mess up linked  calculations.  Choosing Number Filters gives choices for logical or statistical filters such as only viewing  values above the mean for a series, greater than a given number, or a custom configuration.   
  9. 9.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 9 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007 Revised 9.10.2007    PowerPoint 2007 Microsoft’s PowerPoint is a presentation creation application that allows users to make slideshows that  include dynamic elements such as animations, images, sound, and video. In this section of the class we  will give a brief overview of some of the basics of working in PowerPoint and will point out some of its  more advanced features.  Starting a New Slide Show  Home Tab  This is where you will find the old “Edit” menu with Cut, Copy, and Paste options. This is also where the  controls for Slides, Fonts, Alignment, Spacing, Drawing, and Editing will be.      PLEASE NOTE: Some sections in each tab also have  arrows in the bottom right hand corner that offer  additional options in that particular section. For  example, if you want to change the alignment,  indentation, or spacing of your paragraph, you will not  find those options in the menu above. If you click on the  arrow in the “Paragraph” section, however, you will find  them  Customizing a Slide   Insert Tab   This is where you will find controls for inserting Pictures, Movies, Tables, Word Art, Sounds, and Links.     Inserting Illustrations, Links, and Media Clips  Click on the “Insert” button. In the Illustrations section, you will find picture, clip art, photo album,  shapes, smart art, and chart. To insert a picture of something that is already saved on your computer,  click “Picture”. A window will pop up under My Pictures for you to choose from. 
  10. 10.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 10 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007    When you click on Clip Art, a window on the right hand side of the screen will show up, which will  allow you to search for a specific topic. Type in “birthday” in the search box and then click “go”. You  will find your choices below in the window.   You can create a photo album by clicking on the “Photo Album” button and choosing pictures from  your documents.   New in 07: Smart Art   Smart Art offers a number of ready to use graphics in which you can easily edit content.  Click on the SmartArt button. A window will pop up showing your choices: List, Process, Cycle,  Hierarchy, Relationship, Matrix, and Pyramid. Click on the Cycle button, then the Radial Cycle choice,  and then “ok”. You can now type in what would fit in the circles. You will find the SmartArt options  now available on the top of your screen. Click on the Insert tab to return to your menu.   Click on the Hyperlink button in the Links section. In order to add a hyperlink, you can search through  your documents. Once you have found what you are looking for, double click on it, and a hyperlink will  appear on the screen.  To add a movie or sound, click on the respective buttons and search through your documents. You  may also select a movie or sound that is already part of the PowerPoint program. Just click on the  downward pointing arrow located below the word Movie or Sound and choose Movie/Sound from Clip  Organizer. A menu of choices will appear on your right hand side. Again, you can search for a specific  topic, for example, birthday.  Design Tab   This tab contains options for Page Setup, Margins, Page Orientation, Theme, and Background.     PLEASE NOTE: You can view how your new slide would look with the change by holding your mouse over  the option you are contemplating.  New in 07: Themes  Themes allow you to quickly change the look and feel of an entire presentation with a single click.  You  can change aspects of a theme and save the new theme for future use.  Slide Master View  Use slide masters to make design changes that affect each slide in your Microsoft Office PowerPoint  2007 presentation. When you start with a blank presentation, you can add a consistent look to your  slides by customizing the slide master, instead of customizing each slide individually. To customize a  slide master, you specify the placements of text and on a slide. You also specify placeholder sizes, text  styles, backgrounds, theme colors, graphics, effects, and animations. 
  11. 11.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 11 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007    First go to View>Slide Master.  This gives you a “behind the scenes” look at the slide.  You will notice  that there is now a tab in the upper left entitled “Slide Master.”  Click on this tab and select Insert  Placeholder.  Select which kind of placeholder you’d like to put in this master slide, and then click and  drag to place it in the slide.  You can then replace the default text for the place holder with whatever  text (prompt) you’d like.  To save the slide layout, select Rename, from the grouping on the left.  Viewing Your Progress  View: Under this tab, you will be able to change Presentation Views, Zoom, Color Scale, and Window,  which allows you to see your slides one at a time or in a cascade.     Connecting Individual Slides into a Slide Show  Animations: Under this tab, you will find your options for Transitions.     PLEASE NOTE: You can preview each transition by placing your mouse over the particular transition you  want to see. To see all your transition options, click on the bottom arrow located on the right of the  transition options. You can either choose different transitions for each slide, in which you will have to  physically change the transition after you click on an individual slide, or you can apply one transition  option to all your slides by clicking the Apply To All button in the Transition to This Slide section. You  can also choose when the slide will transition by either choosing the On Mouse Click option or setting a  time for when it will automatically transition.   Choosing Transitions  Click on the Home tab and create a new slide. Now go back to the Animations tab. Click on the slide on  your screen. Now scroll down Animate, located in the Animations section. Click Fly In, As One Object.  For the transition, click on the third arrow on the right hand side of the transitions options. Choose  Wipe Right under the Wipes section. For the transition sound, choose Bomb. Then set the transition  speed to fast. Click on the Mouse Click option for when to transition. Now Click on the Slide Show tab  and choose From current Slide in the Start Slide Show section. You can now see how your transition  will look.      
  12. 12.   ©2007 Olin Library Arc    Page 12 of 12  Revised 9.10.2007    Reviewing a Slide Show  Slide Show: Here, you can Start Slide Show from either the beginning or the current slide, Set Up your  slide by recording a narration and time the show, or change the Monitors option by setting up  resolution and which monitor you are using.     Review: Here, you will find your basic proofreading options: Spell Check, Research, Thesaurus,  Translator, Language Check, leave Comments, and Protect Presentation.       Conclusion and Other Resources Although this tutorial has covered most of the important tools in the three most commonly used  programs within the Microsoft Office Suite, it comes far from covering everything. Hopefully many of  the tools you have learned to use in this tutorial will apply to other Office applications you may need to  use in the future and give you a better sense of the new user interface. If you have any specific  questions about the three programs covered in this tutorial feel free to look at one of the more  complete guides to Word, Excel, and PowerPoint located at the front desk. For any information  regarding other Microsoft Office applications you can find many resources on the Web.   

×