0
The Use of Data to Inform Instruction, Building, & District Decisions Greg Lobdell Co-founder & Research Director 19 Septe...
CEE & Data: Supporting a Cycle of Continuous Improvement <ul><li>Expand Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Value-add servi...
Who we serve . . .
Who We Serve
Today’s Outcomes <ul><li>Knowledge and skills:  Models and strategies for using data to inform our practice </li></ul><ul>...
How Will We Get There? <ul><li>Models of Interpretation </li></ul><ul><li>Application, investigation, and understanding th...
So Much Data, So Little Time… <ul><li>By itself,  Data  has no value.  When data is put into a form that is easily underst...
3 Models of Assessment Interpretation <ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Growth </li></ul>
Status <ul><li>Where are we? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Typically viewed relative to a target or desired state </li></ul></ul><...
Improvement (Change) <ul><li>Are we getting better? </li></ul><ul><li>Requires historical data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 yea...
Growth <ul><li>Most often applied to student achievement when viewing student-by-student achievement </li></ul>
Measuring Growth and Improvement <ul><li>Systems for measuring and acting-on require: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Summative (eva...
Conclusive Validity <ul><li>Are the  conclusions  we draw from the data the right ones? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the conversa...
Be Careful with Cause & Effect (Jumping to Conclusions) <ul><li>Establishing Cause  (3 required conditions)   : </li></ul>...
Status, Improvement, and Growth Data Must Share Certain Attributes <ul><li>Educationally Significant </li></ul><ul><li>Ali...
The Three Critical Questions <ul><li>Where are we? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Comparison points provide context </li></ul></ul>...
Application Across Domains of Data <ul><li>Viewing data across Status, Improvement, and Growth should not be limited to st...
Comparison Point
Comparison Points
Relevant SSD Data
Additional Comparison Points % = Results from 17 Latino-Majority Districts
What does your eye say about improvement? % = Results from 17 Latino-Majority Districts
 
Improvement?
3 Models of Assessment Interpretation <ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Growth </li></ul>
Growth Models <ul><li>Models of accountability which measure progress by tracking the achievement of the same students fro...
Two Flavors of Growth Models <ul><li>Growth Models </li></ul><ul><li>Value-Add Models </li></ul><ul><li>Growth Modeling is...
Interpreting Growth  Rates
Interpreting Growth
Interpreting Growth Highest (or fastest) growth “Rate”
Source: Policymaker’s Guide to Growth Models for School Accountability: How Do Accountability Models Differ?  Council of C...
Source: Policymaker’s Guide to Growth Models for School Accountability: How Do Accountability Models Differ?  Council of C...
Which is Better? <ul><li>Depends on the audience and purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents: interested in year to year gro...
Myth of Mobility?
MATH- 4 th  to 7 th  Grade Growth
MATH- 4 th  to 7 th  Grade Growth What about students at levels 1 & 2?
Predictive Assessment to Understand “expected” Growth <ul><li>Summative    Predictive    Diagnostic </li></ul><ul><li>If...
Question 1: How Strong are the Correlations with MAP and WASL? (MVSD) <ul><li>Correlations of .80 are generally accepted a...
Interesting Findings <ul><li>Using “Highest” RIT – not necessarily the most recent – IMPROVES predictability in all cases ...
 
 
How Can We Use This? What Do We See Here in the PINK?
How Can We Use This? What Do We See Here in the Yellow?
How Can We Use This? What Do We See Here in the Green?
What, When, Where, and How? <ul><li>Diagnostic </li></ul><ul><li>Formative </li></ul><ul><li>Summative </li></ul>
Most Data Can (or should be) Used in Multiple Ways
Extending Beyond Achievement Data <ul><li>Using the assessment types, how might this apply beyond achievement? </li></ul><...
 
Schools of Distinction What Makes Them Different?
Schools of Distinction: Design Objectives <ul><li>Recognize  improvement  in performance  over 5+ years. </li></ul><ul><li...
Remembering the Award Winners <ul><li>86 schools were identified as the “highest  improving ” schools </li></ul><ul><ul><l...
School Student Demographics <ul><li>Poverty ranges from 2.4% to 99%. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>31 have greater than 50% povert...
School and District Demographics <ul><li>36 are from districts smaller than 3,000 students  (23 < 1,000) </li></ul><ul><li...
ESD Representation <ul><li>101 = 6 </li></ul><ul><li>105 = 9 </li></ul><ul><li>112 = 8 </li></ul><ul><li>113 = 9 </li></ul...
Elem RMLI 2001-02
Elem RMLI 2007
What’s It Look Like in the Building?
Lower than the state 4 of 5 years Above the state the last 2 years
69% NOT meeting standard to 86% MEETING standard
Today’s Research Data Will Be: Phase III– What can we learn about repeat winners in ’08-’09? Phase I   Practices of Improv...
Phase II  Who Responded? <ul><li>Number of schools = 31 </li></ul><ul><li>N = 811 School of Distinction employees </li></u...
Phase I Focus
Phase II Focus
Let’s Get Into the Results <ul><li>Comparison Set: CEE’s Educational Effectiveness Survey of the 9 Characteristics </li></...
What is The Leader’s Role? <ul><li>Teachers and principals alike assess student and teacher achievement early and often – ...
Experienced Teachers
A Variety of Time In Building
Does it Make a Difference?
Does it Make a Difference?
Does it Make a Difference?
Schools of Distinction Research  Review of Phase I - Research Findings <ul><li>Very High Readiness for Improvement </li></...
Schools of Distinction Research  Phase II – What Have We Learned? <ul><li>Very High Readiness for Improvement </li></ul><u...
Readiness for Improvement or ” Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast ” <ul><li>Values and culture stand out as one of the st...
Application for Today <ul><li>Given your personal theory of change: what in the following results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Su...
Beliefs- Reading
Beliefs- Math
Welcoming New Ideas
A Culture of Collaboration <ul><li>Improved districts build a culture of commitment, collegiality, mutual respect, and sta...
Collaborative Problem Solving
Addressing Conflict
Turnaround Instructional Leadership <ul><li>Principals help schools succeed not when they are flashy superstars, but when ...
Stable Leadership Matters <ul><li>Principals average 5 years “At This School” and 6-10 years experience “As a Principal” <...
Focused Leadership <ul><li>Successful turnarounds are typically marked by vigorous analysis of data, identification of key...
Leadership
Frequent Feedback
Focused Leadership  (from Phase I)
System Support <ul><li>Teachers and principals alike assess student and teacher achievement early and often – and use the ...
Systems Support  (Phase I)
Measuring and Reporting <ul><li>Successful turnarounds are typically marked by measuring and reporting data frequently and...
Data-driven Professional Development
High Quality Teaching and Learning The Instructional Work of the Organization <ul><li>Reduce isolation and open practice u...
Data-driven Instruction <ul><li>Beat-the-odds-schools are figuring out ways to customize instruction and intervention so i...
Personalized Instruction
Data-driven Instruction
Frequency of Practice
Collaboration for Instruction
Making it Happen
Schools of Distinction Research  Phase II – What Have We Learned? <ul><li>Very High Readiness for Improvement </li></ul><u...
Schools of Distinction Research  Phase II – What Have We Learned? (cont…) <ul><li>System Support for Improvement </li></ul...
 
3 Models of Assessment Interpretation <ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Growth </li></ul>
Taxonomy of Assessment Responsiveness
As leaders- How do you Build Toward Responsiveness? <ul><li>Compliance </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Sensi...
[email_address]
References You Can Use <ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2004).   Knowing the Right Things to Do:  School Impr...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Wsu Greg Lobdell September 2008 Data And Decision Making

743

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
743
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Transcript of "Wsu Greg Lobdell September 2008 Data And Decision Making"

    1. 1. The Use of Data to Inform Instruction, Building, & District Decisions Greg Lobdell Co-founder & Research Director 19 September, 2008
    2. 2. CEE & Data: Supporting a Cycle of Continuous Improvement <ul><li>Expand Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Value-add services </li></ul><ul><li>Expertise in core areas </li></ul><ul><li>Partnership is critical </li></ul>CEE Services OSPI & Summit Partners ESDs Districts Schools & Classrooms Demographics & Community Characteristics Perceptual Academic Achievement Contextual-Program and Process
    3. 3. Who we serve . . .
    4. 4. Who We Serve
    5. 5. Today’s Outcomes <ul><li>Knowledge and skills: Models and strategies for using data to inform our practice </li></ul><ul><li>Ideas and application: how do we get from here to there… </li></ul><ul><li>Time to reflect and share </li></ul>
    6. 6. How Will We Get There? <ul><li>Models of Interpretation </li></ul><ul><li>Application, investigation, and understanding the data use in the Schools of Distinction </li></ul><ul><li>Taxonomy of Assessment Responsiveness </li></ul>
    7. 7. So Much Data, So Little Time… <ul><li>By itself, Data has no value. When data is put into a form that is easily understandable, it becomes information . When information is used to guide decisions that are in the best interest of the students and families we serve, it becomes applied knowledge . </li></ul><ul><li>Stan Beckelman , former President of Boeing Information Services </li></ul><ul><li>and Board Member for the Center for Educational Effectiveness </li></ul>
    8. 8. 3 Models of Assessment Interpretation <ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Growth </li></ul>
    9. 9. Status <ul><li>Where are we? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Typically viewed relative to a target or desired state </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be viewed system wide or with any unit of analysis – down to student-by-student </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AYP is a 1-year “Status” model </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Improvement (Change) <ul><li>Are we getting better? </li></ul><ul><li>Requires historical data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 year does NOT make a trend </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Common tools (tests, surveys, etc) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Requires leadership to define “Better” </li></ul><ul><li>“Safe Harbor” is a simple “Improvement” model </li></ul>
    11. 11. Growth <ul><li>Most often applied to student achievement when viewing student-by-student achievement </li></ul>
    12. 12. Measuring Growth and Improvement <ul><li>Systems for measuring and acting-on require: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Summative (evaluative) Assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. WASL </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Formative: Guiding (predictive) assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. NWEA MAP assessment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diagnostic: indicate student-level strengths and challenges which can be used by staff to assist each student </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. Pearson Benchmark </li></ul></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Conclusive Validity <ul><li>Are the conclusions we draw from the data the right ones? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the conversations and actions taken as a result of the conclusions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supported by the data? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructive- leading to positive change? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Due to the volume of data- Summary is a required technique </li></ul>
    14. 14. Be Careful with Cause & Effect (Jumping to Conclusions) <ul><li>Establishing Cause (3 required conditions) : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The cause is related to the effect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No plausible alternative explanation for the effect exists other than the cause </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The cause precedes the effect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Robsinson, D. (et al.). The Incidence of “Causal” Statements in Teaching-and-Learning Research Journals. AERA Research Journal. Vol. 44 No. 2. June 2007 </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Status, Improvement, and Growth Data Must Share Certain Attributes <ul><li>Educationally Significant </li></ul><ul><li>Aligned with Appropriate ‘Standards’ </li></ul><ul><li>Longitudinal </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative / relevant </li></ul><ul><li>Community Sensitive / Culturally Responsive </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate to target </li></ul><ul><li>Accurate / Valid </li></ul>
    16. 16. The Three Critical Questions <ul><li>Where are we? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Comparison points provide context </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where do we want to be? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The movement from Good to Great </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Are we “improving” and “growing”? Are we on a path to get were we want to be? </li></ul>
    17. 17. Application Across Domains of Data <ul><li>Viewing data across Status, Improvement, and Growth should not be limited to student outcome data </li></ul><ul><li>But let’s start with a simple achievement example… </li></ul>
    18. 18. Comparison Point
    19. 19. Comparison Points
    20. 20. Relevant SSD Data
    21. 21. Additional Comparison Points % = Results from 17 Latino-Majority Districts
    22. 22. What does your eye say about improvement? % = Results from 17 Latino-Majority Districts
    23. 24. Improvement?
    24. 25. 3 Models of Assessment Interpretation <ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Growth </li></ul>
    25. 26. Growth Models <ul><li>Models of accountability which measure progress by tracking the achievement of the same students from year to year with the intent of determining whether the students made progress (growth) </li></ul>
    26. 27. Two Flavors of Growth Models <ul><li>Growth Models </li></ul><ul><li>Value-Add Models </li></ul><ul><li>Growth Modeling is NOT a “silver-bullet”– rather, another data analysis technique to use in improvement conversations. </li></ul>
    27. 28. Interpreting Growth Rates
    28. 29. Interpreting Growth
    29. 30. Interpreting Growth Highest (or fastest) growth “Rate”
    30. 31. Source: Policymaker’s Guide to Growth Models for School Accountability: How Do Accountability Models Differ? Council of Chief School Officers (CCSSO) Web site.
    31. 32. Source: Policymaker’s Guide to Growth Models for School Accountability: How Do Accountability Models Differ? Council of Chief School Officers (CCSSO) Web site.
    32. 33. Which is Better? <ul><li>Depends on the audience and purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents: interested in year to year growth for their child </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communities: interested in which school or district shows the greatest growth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Policy-makers: tend to be interested in improvement based on input-factors (Value-add) </li></ul><ul><li>District and Building Leadership: growth and value-add </li></ul>
    33. 34. Myth of Mobility?
    34. 35. MATH- 4 th to 7 th Grade Growth
    35. 36. MATH- 4 th to 7 th Grade Growth What about students at levels 1 & 2?
    36. 37. Predictive Assessment to Understand “expected” Growth <ul><li>Summative  Predictive  Diagnostic </li></ul><ul><li>If we are to look at “expected” or “typical” growth we need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Aligned assessments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Common for all students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fit within overall assessment system </li></ul></ul>
    37. 38. Question 1: How Strong are the Correlations with MAP and WASL? (MVSD) <ul><li>Correlations of .80 are generally accepted as “Strong” correlations </li></ul><ul><li>I.e. “Strong Predictability” </li></ul>
    38. 39. Interesting Findings <ul><li>Using “Highest” RIT – not necessarily the most recent – IMPROVES predictability in all cases (confirmed with several districts’ data what Highline published at Spring WERA Conference) </li></ul>
    39. 42. How Can We Use This? What Do We See Here in the PINK?
    40. 43. How Can We Use This? What Do We See Here in the Yellow?
    41. 44. How Can We Use This? What Do We See Here in the Green?
    42. 45. What, When, Where, and How? <ul><li>Diagnostic </li></ul><ul><li>Formative </li></ul><ul><li>Summative </li></ul>
    43. 46. Most Data Can (or should be) Used in Multiple Ways
    44. 47. Extending Beyond Achievement Data <ul><li>Using the assessment types, how might this apply beyond achievement? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fiscal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizational </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructional </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reflect on this and then pair and share </li></ul>
    45. 49. Schools of Distinction What Makes Them Different?
    46. 50. Schools of Distinction: Design Objectives <ul><li>Recognize improvement in performance over 5+ years. </li></ul><ul><li>Meaningful – Used a Reading and Math Learning Index to determine improvement. </li></ul><ul><li>Additional information for stakeholders—not a replacement for AYP determinations. </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency and openness through the use of publicly available data. </li></ul><ul><li>Must have at least “adequate performance” in both Math and Reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Designed with the future in mind. </li></ul>
    47. 51. Remembering the Award Winners <ul><li>86 schools were identified as the “highest improving ” schools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>51 elementary schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>20 middle schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>15 high schools </li></ul></ul>
    48. 52. School Student Demographics <ul><li>Poverty ranges from 2.4% to 99%. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>31 have greater than 50% poverty </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Non-white enrollment ranges from 0% to 98% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>14 have a non-white majority multi-ethnic student population </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ESL/ELL ranges from 0% to 50% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>17 have more than double the state average for ESL students served (state average is 7%) </li></ul></ul>
    49. 53. School and District Demographics <ul><li>36 are from districts smaller than 3,000 students (23 < 1,000) </li></ul><ul><li>29 are from districts 3,000 to 15,000 </li></ul><ul><li>21 are from districts greater than 15,000 </li></ul><ul><li>36 east of the Cascades </li></ul><ul><li>50 west of the Cascades </li></ul><ul><li>48 are Title I, (38 are NOT) </li></ul>
    50. 54. ESD Representation <ul><li>101 = 6 </li></ul><ul><li>105 = 9 </li></ul><ul><li>112 = 8 </li></ul><ul><li>113 = 9 </li></ul><ul><li>114 = 5 </li></ul><ul><li>121 = 21 </li></ul><ul><li>123 = 10 </li></ul><ul><li>171 = 11 </li></ul><ul><li>189 = 7 </li></ul>
    51. 55. Elem RMLI 2001-02
    52. 56. Elem RMLI 2007
    53. 57. What’s It Look Like in the Building?
    54. 58. Lower than the state 4 of 5 years Above the state the last 2 years
    55. 59. 69% NOT meeting standard to 86% MEETING standard
    56. 60. Today’s Research Data Will Be: Phase III– What can we learn about repeat winners in ’08-’09? Phase I Practices of Improving or Turnaround Schools Oct 2007 – Jan 2008 Phase II EES-Staff Survey Characteristics of High Performing Schools Dec 2007 – May 2008
    57. 61. Phase II Who Responded? <ul><li>Number of schools = 31 </li></ul><ul><li>N = 811 School of Distinction employees </li></ul><ul><li>514 – Certificated teachers </li></ul><ul><li>276 – Other Staff </li></ul><ul><li>22 - Administrators </li></ul>
    58. 62. Phase I Focus
    59. 63. Phase II Focus
    60. 64. Let’s Get Into the Results <ul><li>Comparison Set: CEE’s Educational Effectiveness Survey of the 9 Characteristics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WA Schools who Met AYP: 283 Schools (actual responses: N=16,747 Staff) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WA School who Did NOT meet AYP: 194 Schools (actual responses: N=13,119 Staff) </li></ul></ul>
    61. 65. What is The Leader’s Role? <ul><li>Teachers and principals alike assess student and teacher achievement early and often – and use the information to drive improvement rather than assign blame. </li></ul><ul><li>The key, however, is not simply that the successful schools have data – it’s who is using the data and how they use the data. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006) </li></ul>
    62. 66. Experienced Teachers
    63. 67. A Variety of Time In Building
    64. 68. Does it Make a Difference?
    65. 69. Does it Make a Difference?
    66. 70. Does it Make a Difference?
    67. 71. Schools of Distinction Research Review of Phase I - Research Findings <ul><li>Very High Readiness for Improvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>75% belief that ALL students can meet state standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75% willingness to change, and openness to new ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Culture of Collaboration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High trust across staff and with leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75% willingness to address conflict </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stable – average of 4 yrs in building and 8 years as principal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on instruction and student learning - 50% observe classrooms daily </li></ul></ul><ul><li>System Support for Improvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>80% have release time monthly for professional development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>60% monitor school improvement plans at least monthly </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Quality Instruction and Supportive Instructional Practice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>92% use assessment data to identify student needs and instructional intervention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>84% use data to guide professional development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80% use collaborative lesson design and analysis of student work </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Level of Trust </li></ul><ul><ul><li>71% believe there is a high level of trust in their school </li></ul></ul>
    68. 72. Schools of Distinction Research Phase II – What Have We Learned? <ul><li>Very High Readiness for Improvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>75% belief that ALL students can meet state standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75% willingness to change, and openness to new ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Culture of Collaboration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High trust across staff and with leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75% willingness to address conflict </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stable – average of 4 yrs in building and 8 years as principal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on instruction and student learning - 50% observe classrooms daily </li></ul></ul><ul><li>System Support for Improvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>80% have release time monthly for professional development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>60% monitor school improvement plans at least monthly </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Quality Instruction and Supportive Instructional Practice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>92% use assessment data to identify student needs and instructional intervention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>84% use data to guide professional development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80% use collaborative lesson design and analysis of student work </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Level of Trust </li></ul><ul><ul><li>71% believe there is a high level of trust in their school </li></ul></ul>Reading and Math Beliefs are more important – both in top 10! Collaborative planning for integration of literacy and numeracy across the curric. Leadership facilitate processes for improvement Staff have frequent feedback about how they are doing Teachers engage in PD learn and apply skills and strategies Struggling students receive intervention Celebrating student success Teachers integrate literacy and numeracy Strength in positive side of Trust Lower “Trust Erosion” factors
    69. 73. Readiness for Improvement or ” Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast ” <ul><li>Values and culture stand out as one of the strongest and most consistent contrasts between beat-the-odds schools and the comparison schools. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006) </li></ul>
    70. 74. Application for Today <ul><li>Given your personal theory of change: what in the following results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supports where you are heading? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Causes you to adjust your thinking? </li></ul></ul>
    71. 75. Beliefs- Reading
    72. 76. Beliefs- Math
    73. 77. Welcoming New Ideas
    74. 78. A Culture of Collaboration <ul><li>Improved districts build a culture of commitment, collegiality, mutual respect, and stability. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional culture of high standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trust, mutual respect, and competence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunities for peer support, collaboration, and develop professional learning communities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Shannon & Bylsma (2004) </li></ul>
    75. 79. Collaborative Problem Solving
    76. 80. Addressing Conflict
    77. 81. Turnaround Instructional Leadership <ul><li>Principals help schools succeed not when they are flashy superstars, but when they stay focused on the things that truly improve schools and keep pushing ahead, no matter what the roadblocks </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006) </li></ul>
    78. 82. Stable Leadership Matters <ul><li>Principals average 5 years “At This School” and 6-10 years experience “As a Principal” </li></ul>
    79. 83. Focused Leadership <ul><li>Successful turnarounds are typically marked by vigorous analysis of data, identification of key problems, and selection of strategies to address the central challenges. </li></ul><ul><li>Two leader actions fall into this category: </li></ul><ul><li>Collecting and personally analyzing organization performance data </li></ul><ul><li>Making an action plan based on data </li></ul><ul><li>School Turnarounds (2007) </li></ul>
    80. 84. Leadership
    81. 85. Frequent Feedback
    82. 86. Focused Leadership (from Phase I)
    83. 87. System Support <ul><li>Teachers and principals alike assess student and teacher achievement early and often – and use the information to drive improvement rather than assign blame. </li></ul><ul><li>The key, however, is not simply that the successful schools have data – it’s who is using the data and how they use the data. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006) </li></ul>
    84. 88. Systems Support (Phase I)
    85. 89. Measuring and Reporting <ul><li>Successful turnarounds are typically marked by measuring and reporting data frequently and publically. </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple principals in successful turnarounds identified sharing data on a regular basis as a key means to identify practices that were working well, and alternatively, those that were not working. </li></ul><ul><li>School Turnarounds (2007) </li></ul>
    86. 90. Data-driven Professional Development
    87. 91. High Quality Teaching and Learning The Instructional Work of the Organization <ul><li>Reduce isolation and open practice up to direct observation, analysis, and feedback. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make direct observation of practice, analysis, and feedback a routine feature of work. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Elmore (2000, 2002, and 2004) </li></ul>
    88. 92. Data-driven Instruction <ul><li>Beat-the-odds-schools are figuring out ways to customize instruction and intervention so it exactly suits each student’s needs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The beat-the-odds schools are putting in place a whole set of interlocking practices and policies geared toward winning a marathon (instead of a sprint). It involves a vital cycle of instruction, assessment, and intervention, followed by more instruction, assessment and intervention. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006) </li></ul>
    89. 93. Personalized Instruction
    90. 94. Data-driven Instruction
    91. 95. Frequency of Practice
    92. 96. Collaboration for Instruction
    93. 97. Making it Happen
    94. 98. Schools of Distinction Research Phase II – What Have We Learned? <ul><li>Very High Readiness for Improvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Belief that ALL students can meet state standards- Reading and Math </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75% willingness to change, and openness to new ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Culture of Collaboration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High trust across staff and with leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong willingness to address conflict and openness to new ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stable – average of 4 yrs in building and 8 years as principal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on instruction and student learning - 50% observe classroom instruction daily with frequent feedback to staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitate systems and processes for improvement </li></ul></ul>
    95. 99. Schools of Distinction Research Phase II – What Have We Learned? (cont…) <ul><li>System Support for Improvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>80% have release time monthly for professional development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>60% monitor school improvement plans at least monthly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers use collaborative time for instructional improvement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Quality Instruction and Supportive Instructional Practice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>73% Struggling students receive intervention based on assessment data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80% use assessment data to identify student needs and instructional intervention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>68% use data to guide professional development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80% use collaborative lesson design and analysis of student work </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Level of Trust </li></ul><ul><ul><li>71% believe there is a high level of trust in their school </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low trust erosion factors-- negativity and “I vs They” mindset </li></ul></ul>
    96. 101. 3 Models of Assessment Interpretation <ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Growth </li></ul>
    97. 102. Taxonomy of Assessment Responsiveness
    98. 103. As leaders- How do you Build Toward Responsiveness? <ul><li>Compliance </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Sensitivity </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li>Responsiveness </li></ul>
    99. 104. [email_address]
    100. 105. References You Can Use <ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2004). Knowing the Right Things to Do: School Improvement and Performance-Based Accountability. Washington, D.C.: National Governors Association- Center for Best Practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Marzano, R. (2003). What Works in Schools: Translating Research Into Action. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006). Morrison Institute for Public Policy (2006). Why Some Schools With Latino Children Beat the Odds…and Others Don’t. Tempe, AZ.: Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona State University, jointly with Center for the Future of Arizona. (aka: “Beat The Odds (2006) ). </li></ul><ul><li>School Turnarounds (2007). Public Impact (2007). School Turnarounds: A review of the cross-sector evidence on dramatic organizational improvement. Public Impact, Academic Development Institute- prepared for the Center on Innovation and Improvement. Retrieved from : http://www.centerii.org / (aka: School Turnarounds (2007)). </li></ul><ul><li>Shannon, G.S. & Bylsma, P. (2004). Characteristics of Improved School Districts: Themes from Research. Olympia, WA. Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Shannon, G.S. & Bylsma, P. (2003). Nine Characteristics of High Performing Schools. A research-based resource for school leadership teams to assist with the School Improvement Process. Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Olympia, WA. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary </li></ul><ul><li>Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE) (2005). Longitudinal Change in Staff Perceptions of the 9 Characteristics of High Performing Schools in OSPI SIA Cohort-II and III Schools. Redmond, WA: Center for Educational Effectiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2000). Building a New Structure For School Leadership . Washington, D.C.: The Albert Shanker Institute. </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2002). Bridging the Gap Between Standards and Achievement. Washington, D.C.: The Albert Shanker Institute. </li></ul><ul><li>Quinn, R. and Rohrbaugh, J. (1983). A spatial model of effectiveness criteria: Toward a competing values approach to organizational analysis. Management Science, 29(3), 363-377. </li></ul><ul><li>Tschannen-Moran, (2004). Trust Matters, Leadership for Successful Schools. San Francisco, CA. Jossey-Bass. </li></ul>
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×