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Jim kowalkowski presentation to wsu supt certification program group

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  • 1. Small School Districts:Challenges &Opportunities Presentation to WSU Field-Based Superintendents Program Feb. 11, 2012
  • 2. …strategies that will help you be successful as aleader in small & rural districts
  • 3. …strategies that willhelp you be successfulas a leader in small & rural districts in any sized district!
  • 4. Who is this guy?• Superintendent- Davenport School District – 5 years• Director – Rural Education Center – 9 years• Superintendent- Pomeroy School District – 8 years• Principal- Pomeroy Jr-Sr High School – 5 years• Principal – Vista Middle School (Ferndale, WA) – 3 years• Assistant Principal – Vista Middle School – 4 years
  • 5. A few words about the handouts…• Seattle Times editorial…• JLARC report summary on study of School District Cost & Size• Dr. Bill Keim’s testimony to House Ed. Committee• WASA Flyer• Rural Ed. Center Research Brief
  • 6. Topics• Unique expectations, characteristics, and challenges facing small and rural districts• Working with legislators• Connecting with the community• Passing bonds and levies• Strategies for keeping your sanity while wearing many hats!• Helping staff deal with change
  • 7. Today’s Presentation• Show you some “on-the-ground & real” examples…• Please ask questions…• I have sent this PowerPoint to Dr. Sharratt—he will send it to you
  • 8. A few words about the WSU Field-Based Superintendent’s Certification Program This program will help you become a great leader…people will be counting on you to prepare your school system for a bright future for students, staff, and your community…
  • 9. Most School Districts are Small but Large Districts Enroll Most Students151 small districts: 29 large districts: Less than 1,000 More than 10,000 students each students each 53.3% 41.4% 9.8% 5.3% Enrollment 51.2% 39.0% 53.4% 40.1% 115 medium districts: 6.5% 1,000 to 10,000Total: 295 districts students each Expenditures Source: JLARC analysis of 2007-08 school district financial and enrollment data provided by LEAP. School District Cost & Size 9 Report Pages Final Report Proposed 6-7
  • 10. Unique Characteristics of Small Districts• You will always be under a microscope as the leader of the school• There is no place to hide!• Video story…
  • 11. Unique Characteristics of Small Districts• Every patron has an opinion on these three things: – What strategies and plays the basketball coach should be using… – What teacher or staff member needs to be put on the first bus out of town… – What should be taught up there at that school…
  • 12. Unique Characteristics of Small Districts• Community members expect you to use their tax dollars wisely…• Your parents and your community want a good, strong school system…• You better take darn good care of the kids…
  • 13. “Gotta Do’s”• Be visible in the community• Join Chamber, Lions Club, Rotary, etc.• If you make a mistake—own it, do not try and “spin it”…• Be the educational leader and expert in your community
  • 14. “Gotta Do’s”• Be a cheerleader and advocate for your school district• Insist that the “chain of command” is followed (assist if needed)• Take good care of yourself, so you can take care of your staff and your school system
  • 15. Working with Legislators• “Some one else will do that…”• “I don’t have time to keep up with all this legislative stuff…”• Someone at WASA will take care of all of this…”
  • 16. Working with Legislators• “If you don’t advocate for your students and your community, who will?
  • 17. A few word about what I learned from Dr. Don Cox• Served as a state Representative for many years• District 9 – Colfax / Whitman County• An incredible mentor and leader• Integrity, honesty, consistency, passio nate about education• “Get to know your legislators and get them in your school district.”• Ross Hunter trip to Garfield County
  • 18. Develop relationships with your legislators…Playboy Magazine, Lind Combine Derby & a State Senator…
  • 19. Welcome to the Davenport School District!House Education Committee Visit Oct. 5, 2011
  • 20. Welcome to Mrs. Ballance’s 5th Grade ClassroomTECHNOLOGY UPGRADES Integrated Pole Vault System Amplified Sound & Speaker System Document Camera “thin clients”
  • 21. Davenport School DistrictQuick Facts: Enrollment: 563 students, K-12 Free/Reduced: 53% of our students 34 certificated teachers 17 instructional paraprofessionals 10 bus drivers 2 principals 1 superintendent
  • 22. DaComprehensive High School —27 credits required for graduation
  • 23. Quick Overview ofOur Construction Project
  • 24. Floor plan schematic
  • 25. Tremendous Community Support!
  • 26. Energy Efficiency New HVAC system We qualify for aOld boiler system $34,000 energy rebate from Avista !
  • 27. Google earth shot
  • 28. Significant Loss in State Funding I-728 funds In 2008-09 - we received $259,293 In 2011-12 – we are receiving $0
  • 29. Tremendous community support… Significant Increase in M & O Levy Amount.. Year Amount Notes 2007 675.000 2009 738,000 We have raised our 2011 945,000 M & O Levy 44% from 2012 975,000 2007 to 2012 2013 998,000
  • 30. Davenport School Bond Passed in March, 2009Amount From LocalVoters: $7.3 millionState Match WeQualify For: $7.2 millionTotal Available ForProject: $14.5 million
  • 31. Tremendous Community SupportTax Rates: M&O Bond Total Levy $4.30 $3.20 $7.50
  • 32. Levy Equalization• LEA is a significant • Our starting cash component to our reserve for 2011-12 school district was $417,000 budget• 2011-12…We are scheduled to receive $411,894 in LEA funds
  • 33. Dealing with Cuts• In the last four years • We have increased we have cut 4.5 our M & O Levy by teaching positions. 44% since 2007.• We are working hard • How much more can to maintain the we ask our programs desired by community for? our community.
  • 34. We are proudof ourpartnershipwithNorthEastWashingtonESD 101
  • 35. Outstanding drama,choir & band programs!
  • 36. Programs we are proud of! FFA
  • 37. Math Team Weparticipate inMath CountsMath is Cool Math Olympiad
  • 38. Future Business Leaders of America Gold Seal Chapter Award of Merit 1978-2011 4th Place – National Conference – Partnership Team 8th Place – National Conference – Partnership Team Top 15 – National Conference – Community Service
  • 39. NAVIGATION 101Over 90% parent participation in student led conferences for grades 9-11.Third year of program which encompasses grades 7-12.
  • 40. KNOWLEDGE BOWLState participants in Knowledge Bowl at Central Valley High School
  • 41. Partnership with Lincoln County Heath DepartmentCollaborate for Healthy Weight Project—National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare QualityOne of only 10 projects in the nation!
  • 42. Collaboration with our ESD“You want national experts on the cutting edge of what is happening to come to our region? We can do that!
  • 43. Partnership with our ESD• Assisting with Fiscal Services• Workers Compensation Program• Asbestos Inspections & Mold Testing• Managing Lincoln County Readiness & Emergency Management for Schools Project• TPEP Consortium• Student Assistance Counselor Funding (The ESD is able to leverage funding so we go from 1 day of service to 3 days!)
  • 44. What key messages were beingcommunicated in this presentation? What key messages resonated with you? Do you think this presentation to legislators made an impact?
  • 45. Small & Rural Districts and Communities are Under Attack• Cuts being proposed this session to Critical Access Hospitals• Cuts to Small High Funding Enhancement..on the chopping block!
  • 46. Small & Rural Districts and Communities are Under Attack Forced Consolidation…what’s up with that?Note: not necessarily a just a small school district issue
  • 47. Update:Consolidation Efforts in Washington State
  • 48. • Goals & Objectives of this Session: Provide to you the following… Up-to-date information on consolidation efforts in our state Brief overview of sharing of efficiencies and a discussion on “areas of vulnerability” Strategies to continue to educate policy makers Time for Q & A
  • 49. Segment A:Up-to-Date InformationOn Consolidation Efforts Jim Kowalkowski
  • 50. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State• Between 1910 & 1994, the number of districts in WA State declined from 2,710 to 296• 1993 Legislative Session: A measure was introduced (but not passed) that would have dissolved school districts (not schools) with enrollments of 150 or less in grades K-8
  • 51. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts in Washington State• Following the 1993 legislative session, the State Board of Ed. created a School District Reorganization Committee that met from Oct. 1993 to Dec. 1994• This report stated the following…
  • 52. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State• “The state has essentially reached the end of the line on significant savings through consolidation.”• “One of the primary aims of education restructuring is more community involvement…forced consolidation is the wrong flow given the direction of ESHB 1209”
  • 53. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State• “For the reasons outlines in this report, the School District Reorganization Committee strongly recommend that the state not make any changes in law which would further mandate school district consolidations”
  • 54. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State• 2009 Legislative Session – Governor Gregoire includes in her budget proposal language stating that the OSPI superintendent shall make recommendation for a streamlined school district consolidation process to: • Reduce operating costs • Reduce administrative duplication • Create efficiencies to offer better programmatic opportunities for students • Recommendations shall also include specific proposals for realigned school districts
  • 55. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State• 2010 Legislative Session – Rep. Sam Hunt introduces HB 2616 • Would create a commission on statewide school district reorganization • This commission shall develop and recommend a comprehensive plan that shall result in no more that 150 school districts • The plan shall also result in reorganization of the number & boundaries of ESDs – SB 6444 (Senate Budget Bill) • Included language that creates a commission on statewide school district reorganization • Establishes a School District Reorganization Commission that is directed to develop and recommend a comprehensive plan to reorganize and reduce school districts in our state
  • 56. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State• 2010 Legislative Session – SB 6444 is Passed by the Legislature – On May 4the Governor Vetoes the Language that would have created the “consolidation commission”
  • 57. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State• Summer of 2010 –The Joint Legislative Audit Review Committee (JLARC) releases a final report regarding the relationship between the cost of school districts and their enrollment size… –OFM & Governor’s Office…public hearings on “Transforming Washington’s Budget”
  • 58. RESTRUCTURING IDEAS1. School and district consolidation, efficiencyand partnership. Increase inter-district cost-sharing through effective use of EducationalService Districts (ESD) and other entities ormechanisms. Look at ways to improve ESDsand use them to achieve greater cross-districtefficiencies and effectiveness. Consider statefunding formula changes to increase localpressure toward consolidation ofdistricts, schools and/or programs. (Education)
  • 59. 2. Decide whether wewant state or local control.State control - focus onconsolidation…
  • 60. Quick Review of Consolidation Efforts to Date in Washington State HB 1325 is heard in the House Education Committee on Feb. 10, 2011
  • 61. But, thanks to a “super hero”, this bill is defeated…
  • 62. There is yet another superhero among you today…Dr. Dingman…
  • 63. How important is it to connect with your local legislators? What would it take for you totravel to Olympia and testify and/or meet with legislators? If not you, then who?
  • 64. Passing Bond Measures in Small Districts: It Can Be Done! WSSDA Annual Conference Spokane, WA
  • 65. • Presenters: Sergio Hernandez, Superintendent Freeman School District John Zingg, Director Freeman School District Jim Kowalkowski, Superintendent Davenport School District & Director, Rural Education Center Davenport School DistrictExplore…Discover…Create…Contribute Merilla Hopkins, Director Davenport School District Kim Spacek, Superintendent Pomeroy School District
  • 66. • Goals & Objectives of this Session: Gain a better understanding of successful strategies regarding school construction bond projects Learn about the many details that need to be considered, from the idea and planning stage to the opening day ceremony Hear about ways to mobilize support in a small community Provide time for questions and answers!
  • 67. Overview of Davenport School District Bond Project• $7.3 local funds• $7.2 state matching dollars• Modernize & Expand Davenport Elementary School• Construct an addition for a middle school wing for Grades 7-8
  • 68. Floor plan schematic
  • 69. Each School District Will Share Success Strategies• Deciding how much to build…how big the bond measure will be…• Getting community input…• Advertizing the bond…• Working with consultants… • Financial… • Project Management… • Architect…
  • 70. Projected Tax Rates Levy / $1000 Assessed Value Capital Projects Levy Rate M&O Rate 2009 Bonds 2001 Bonds10.00 9.00 8.00 7.00 6.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 - 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029
  • 71. Davenport School DistrictReplacement M & O Levy Presentation to Davenport Lions Club
  • 72. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: When does the current levy expire?A: December, 2010
  • 73. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: Why is this called a “replacement levy”?A: This is not a new tax. It is a renewal of the M & O tax that is currently being paid by voters
  • 74. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: What do levy funds pay for?A: See next page…
  • 75. Levy dollars fund the following:Extra-curricular and co-curricular activities athletics, Knowledge Bowl, drama, choir, FFA, FBLA, field trips, safety equipment, etc.Bus travel for events (fuel, drivers)Textbook adoptions & curriculumupdates
  • 76. Levy dollars fund the following:School Resource OfficerLincoln County Juvenile Court ServicesCoaches & advisors salariesPortions of salaries for administrators and otherstaff not covered by state fundingNERCS (non-employee related costs) Heat, lights, utilities, supplies, equipment
  • 77. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: When was the last M & O Levy that voters approved?A: In March of 2006, voters approved a four-year levy…
  • 78. LevyCollection Levy Amount Tax Rate Year 2007 $675,064 3.60 2008 $695,871 3.52 2009 $716,250 3.47 2010 $738,000 3.46
  • 79. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: How much is the school district asking for and how long will this levy be?A: See next page…
  • 80. Levy Collection Year Proposed Estimated Levy Amount Tax Rate 2011 $945,000 4.30 2012 $975,000 4.30 2013 $998,000 4.28 This request is for a three-year levy
  • 81. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: Wow! That seems like a lot to ask for. Why are you asking for so much more?A: We are expecting significant cuts in state funding…
  • 82. Explanation ofMatching Funds Possible Cuts
  • 83. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: Okay, if the levy passes, then the school district will have plenty of money, right?A: No…we are still facing cuts…
  • 84. Governor’s Possible Deficit Budget Levy Increase$440,000 cut in $206,750 $233,250revenue to theDavenportSchool District
  • 85. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: Why don’t you just ask the voters for as much as you can?A: We could ask the voters to approve a levy at our allowable levy limit…
  • 86. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&A…which is $1,089,506 This is the amount we have the authority to ask for, but…
  • 87. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&A…which is $1,089,506 …this would result in a tax rate of 4.95 per $1,000.…ouch!
  • 88. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Quick FactsThe M & O Levy comprises approximately 20% of the school district’s total budget
  • 89. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Quick Facts274 of the 296 public school districts in the State of Washington run M & O leviesThat is over 92% of all districts
  • 90. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Quick FactsThe Reardan-Edwall school district M & O Levy amount for 2010 is $1,019,000. (This has already been approved.)Reardan-Edwall has 664 students, K-12. Davenport has 591 students, K-12.
  • 91. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: Why don’t you just make some cuts instead of asking for more money”?A: Good question. We have already made some significant cuts…
  • 92. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AFor this current school year, we are receiving less funding from the state. These are cuts we have already made:Cut 2.5 teaching positionsAll administrators and district office staff took a voluntary cut in salaryOur coaches and advisors took a 3% cut in salary
  • 93. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&ASignificant reduction in supplies and equipmentRestructured our contract with Lincoln County Juvenile Court ServicesCooperating with neighboring school districts to share transportation for extracurricular events
  • 94. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: Just get on with it…what is the bottom line here? In other words how much will my taxes increase?
  • 95. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AA: 84 cents per $1,000 of assessed value…
  • 96. Current Current New Estimated EstimatedValue of (2010) M&O Estimated Tax Yearly Yearly M & O Tax Yearly Increase per M & O Taxes M&O Home Rate Taxes $1,000 Tax Per $1,000 Increase $100,000 3.46 $346 .84 $430 $84 $84 annual increase = $7 monthly increase
  • 97. Current Current New Estimated EstimatedValue of (2010) M&O Estimated Tax Yearly Yearly M & O Tax Yearly Increase per M & O Taxes M&O Home Rate Taxes $1,000 Tax Per $1,000 Increase $150,000 3.46 $519 .84 $645 $126$126 annual increase = $10.50 monthly increase
  • 98. Current Current New Estimated EstimatedValue of (2010) M&O Estimated Tax Yearly Yearly M & O Tax Yearly Increase per M & O Taxes M&O Home Rate Taxes $1,000 Tax Per $1,000 Increase $200,000 3.46 $692 .84 $860 $168$168 annual increase = $14.00 monthly increase
  • 99. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy Q&AQ: What about the bond that was passed last March…did you structure the tax rate to stay “level”?A: YES! See next page…
  • 100. Projected Tax Rates Levy / $1000 Assessed Value Capital Projects Levy Rate M&O Rate 2009 Bonds 2001 Bonds10.00 9.00 8.00 7.00 6.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 - 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029
  • 101. Davenport School District Replacement M & O Levy TimelinesBallots Mailed Out from Courthouse: Jan. 22Community Forum: Jan. 25 – 6PM @ Davenport High LibraryElection Date: Feb. 9
  • 102. Questions?Tip: If you get asked a question that you dontknow off the top of your head, then promisethat person you will get back to them, andthen make sure the very next day you fulfillyour promise…better yet, send that info toeveryone who was in attendance…
  • 103. “Gotta Do’s” regarding passing levies and bonds• Be honest with your patrons ---ALWAYS!• Be aware of two campaign periods – mail-in ballots• Double check the wording on the ballot before it is published!• Copy and steal from other districts... (similar to stealing plays from the other team when you coached!)
  • 104. “Gotta Do’s” regardingpassing levies and bonds Say THANK YOU many, m any times !
  • 105. Strategies for Keeping your Sanity While Wearing Many Hats
  • 106. Develop a network of fellow superintendents for supportLook around thisroom…thesefolks can be atremendousresource…
  • 107. When faced with a difficult situation… Call WASA Call your WSU faculty & your fellow superintendents Call your ESD supt. Call the school district’s attorney!
  • 108. When faced with a difficult situation… Assume the worst…work your way back from there Document, document, document… Embrace the fact that you will have to deal with some very disturbing incidents… Call the school district’s attorney!
  • 109. Take good care of yourself… This will be the most stressful job you will ever have…
  • 110. Helping Staff Members Overcome Resistance to ChangeMMRE Professional Development Oct. 14, 2011
  • 111. Resistance… “There is no way I am going to change what I do in MY classroom…”
  • 112. Is change hard for you?Why or why not?Reflect, then share some of your experiences with change..
  • 113. Why is change so difficult for manystaff members?List some reasons……then partner share
  • 114. the leader…What can you do, as a leader of staff members, to help “fight the resistance”?
  • 115. ChangeChange is a process…not an event! A process is a chain of connections and events directed at a particular goal
  • 116. Three “Stages” of ChangeStage 1: Implementation… (novice stage)  “awareness level”  This occurs after some training has taken place  Practical, hands-on classroom knowledge has not yet happened Today’s activities / Skill level?
  • 117. Three “Stages” of ChangeStage 2: Infusion…  “usage level”  “mechanically using a skill”  Teachers have to deliberately think to use the change, but they are doing so!
  • 118. Three “Stages” of ChangeStage 3: Immersion  “expert level”  Demonstrating a high degree of skill, flexibility, confidence…the skill is integrated into your teaching repertoire
  • 119. A word of caution… At each stage of the continuum of change, passive or active rejection can easily occur without continued monitoring and support!
  • 120. Self-reflection• I have been identified as a leader who will help others in my district change..• Before I help others, how open am I to change?• Do I need to make any changes before I work with others to get them to change?• What tools and skills will I need to help others change?
  • 121. Last bit of advice… …make it so!

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