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Superintendent's Bulletin 6 11-10
 

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    Superintendent's Bulletin 6 11-10 Superintendent's Bulletin 6 11-10 Document Transcript

    • Wellesley Public Schools 40 Kingsbury Street Wellesley, Massachusetts 02481 Superintendent’s Bulletin www.wellesley.k12.ma.us/district/bulletins.htm Bella T. Wong Bulletin # 36 Superintendent of Schools June 11, 2010 The Superintendent’s Bulletin is posted weekly on Fridays on our website. It provides timely, relevant information about meetings, professional development opportunities, curriculum and program development, grant awards, and School Committee news. The bulletin is also the official vehicle for job postings. Please read the bulletin regularly and use it to inform colleagues of meetings and other school news. Congratulations
to
WPS
Retirees!!! David
Boston


Penny
Copplestone




Diane
Diamond



Carol
Gregory



Ann
Hoffman



 Madeline
Kalotkin



Roberta
Maguire



Dianne
McCarthy



Lynn
Moore‐Benson




 Beth
Pullman







Marcia
Robinson






Jeffrey
Williams
 
 CALENDAR
 
 Thursday,
6/17


Last
Day
of
School
for
Students
(Half
Day)
 


































ENJOY
THE
SUMMER!!!
 
 
 
 
 
 PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
 








 Dear
Faculty,
 In
order
to
provide
you
with
more
professional
development
opportunities
at
low
or
no
cost,
TEC
member
districts
are
 working
together
to
open
up
available
courses
to
faculty
from
other
TEC
districts.

 To
view
the
courses
being
offered
and
registration
information,
please
visit
the
TEC
Inter‐District
Professional
 Development
wiki
at
http://interdistrictprofdevel.wikispaces.com/
Faculty
from
the
district
providing
the
course
will
be
 given
registration
priority.
 We
hope
you
will
take
advantage
of
these
offerings
and
that
we
will
be
able
to
expand
our
collaboration
in
the
future.
 Have
a
terrific
summer!

    • The
Education
Cooperative
(TEC)
will
soon
be
recruiting
the
third
cohort
for
the
Teaching
American
History
 program.

This
will
be
an
exciting
year
focused
on
“The
Story
of
American
Freedom:

Citizenship
and
the
 Changing
Meaning
of
Democracy.”

Courses
begin
in
the
fall
of
2010.
 
 This
grant
funded
professional
development
program
includes:


 
























 • 3
Free
graduate
credits
(3
additional
credits
available
 • A
$500
Stipend
 • 135
PDPs
 
 Loads
of
resource
materials,
including
free
and
forever
access
to
WebLessons
 Historians
from
Harvard
University,
MIT
and
Holy
Cross
College
 
 We
encourage
applications
from
TEC
district
teams
of
2‐5.

Applications
will
be
distributed
after
April
vacation
 week.
 
 Please
take
a
look
at
the
TEC
TAH
wiki:

http://industrialrevolution09.pbworks.com/
 The
slide
show
featured
on
the
home
page
highlights
some
of
the
historical
field
experiences
of
last
summer.
 
 Michelle
LeBlanc,
TEC’s
Teaching
American
History
Project
Director,
would
be
delighted
to
come
and
talk
in
 detail
about
this
intensive
program
and
to
share
the
amazing
wealth
of
resources
created
by
participating
 teachers.

Contact
Michelle
directly
at
781‐326‐2473
x
107.
 
 






RETIREMENT
TRIBUTES
.
.
.
.
.
.
 
 David
Boston,
Science
Teacher,
has
been
a
valued
member
of
the
Wellesley
science
program
for
over
30
 years.

He
is
the
last
of
a
group
of
three
teachers,
including
Frank
Scafati
and
Ralph
Bowman,
who
moved
to
the
high
 school
when
the
ninth
grade
was
relocated.

Like
his
compatriots,
Dave
has
made
a
deep
and
lasting
impression
on
the
 science
department,
and
his
contributions
will
be
missed.

As
the
resident
“tinkerer”,
he
was
relied
upon
to
keep
the
 myriad
of
instruments
in
the
science
department
functioning.

His
mechanical,
electrical
and
general
knowledge
allowed
 him
to
keep
things
from
vacuum
pumps
to
Van
de
Graaf
Generators
functional,
often
long
beyond
their
life
expectancy.

 His
mechanical
talents
were
put
to
good
use
at
home
as
well,
where
he
restored
and
maintained
a
collection
of
pinball
 machines
and
other
arcade
games,
as
well
as
a
couple
of
motorcycles.

It
was
a
more
reliable
sign
of
spring
than
the
 robins
when
Dave
would
take
out
his
motorcycles
and
ride
to
school.


As
a
colleague,
Dave
was
genial
and
friendly.

His
 easy‐going
nature
and
warmth
made
him
a
valued
member
of
the
department.

He
always
seemed
to
see
the
goodness
 in
everyone
whether
it
was
a
colleague
or
a
student.

In
the
classroom,
it
was
clear
that
he
cared
deeply
about
the
 success
of
his
students.

He
wanted
to
impart
to
them
a
love
for
science
and
how
it
allows
them
to
make
sense
of
the
 world.

He
sought
nothing
less
than
having
all
of
his
students
be
successful.

That
he
was
successful
in
instilling
a
love
of
 science
in
students
is
evident
in
the
legions
of
students
who
speak
fondly
about
the
experiences
they
had
in
his
physics
 2
    • and
earth
science
classes.

Fond
memories
and
high
praise
also
come
from
colleagues,
both
in
and
outside
of
the
science
 department
who
respect
his
dedication
and
friendship.

As
a
senior
member
of
the
science
department,
Dave
tirelessly
 took
on
the
role
of
mentor,
working
collaboratively
with
junior
members
of
the
department
to
help
them
be
successful.

 He
was
always
willing
to
help
out,
provide
resources
or
give
advice
without
expecting
anything
 in
return.

For
this
reason,
one
of
the
most
valuable
legacies
that
Dave
will
leave
behind
is
 the
colleagues
he
inspired.

So
while
Dave's
quiet
excellence
(and
the
sound
of
his
 motorcycle)
will
no
longer
be
a
part
of
the
school,
his
passion
and
dedication
will
continue
 to
live
on
in
those
of
us
who
learned
a
great
deal
from
his
example.

 
 
 
 PENNY
COPPLESTONE,
Elementary
Teacher.



Former
Hunnewell
Principal
Ellen
Cunniff
always
had
 an
eye
for
teacher
talent
and
naturally
had
the
good
inimitable
sense
to
hire
Penny
as
a
permanent
teacher
after
Penny
 served
a
short
stint
as
a
long‐term
substitute
teacher
in
her
school.

Penny
was
re‐ entering
the
teaching
field
after
a
seven‐year
hiatus
from
teaching
to
stay
at
home
with
 her
young
daughter
that
followed
an
extremely
successful
seventeen‐year
career
as
a
 teacher
in
the
Framingham
public
schools.

We
were
most
fortunate
to
have
this
talented
 veteran
fall
into
our
laps.

In
her
first
year
she
helped
us
to
update
the
authenticity
of
the
 Boston
Unit
and
in
just
her
third
year
she
successfully
applied
for
and
was
awarded
the
 first
Ruth
S.
Walter
Grant
for
Environmental
Education
that
funded
the
beautiful
Japanese
 Garden
now
located
at
the
Hunnewell
School
across
from
the
famous
Hunnewell
tree.


It
 was
an
auspicious
beginning
to
what
has
been
a
remarkable
teaching
career
here
in
 Wellesley.



During
her
fourteen
years
as
a
Wellesley
elementary
teacher
at
the
 Hunnewell
and
Sprague
Elementary
Schools,
Penny
has
been
a
teacher
leader
respected
and
looked
up
to
by
her
 colleagues
at
both
schools
and
across
the
district.

She
was
always
one
of
the
first
teachers
to
take
on
new
technology
 offerings
and
has
always
been
a
consistent
and
stalwart
advocate
for
student
equity,
particularly
around
issues
of
racial
 diversity
and
achievement.

Her
students
and
families
will
remember
her
as
a
teacher
who
created
a
safe
classroom
 environment
embedded
with
respect
and
high
expectations
for
each
and
every
student
no
matter
what
his
or
her
 interest
or
learning
style.


Her
students
and
families
will
remember
how
firmly
Penny
believed
in
the
possibility
of
 positive
outcomes
for
each
and
every
student
and
how
tenaciously
she
worked
with
each
student
to
achieve
that
vision.

 We
will
all
miss
her
can
do
attitude.


Seventeen
plus
fourteen….thirty‐one
years!

Wow!

Congratulations
Penny!
 
 
 DIANE
DIAMOND,
Elementary
Teacher.



There
are
many
remarkable
attributes
that
should
be
 included
in
this
tribute
to
Diane
Diamond.
Among
the
most
noteworthy
is
that
Diane
has
dedicated
her
entire
35‐year
 career
to
serving
children
and
families
in
the
Wellesley
Public
Schools.

Diane
began
her
outstanding
career
in
Wellesley
 in
October
1975
as
a
Teaching
Assistant
at
the
Upham
School.

In
September
1976,
Diane
began
her
career
as
a
 classroom
teacher
at
Upham,
teaching
for
two
years
in
Grade
2
followed
by
one
year
in
Grade
4.
 Diane
then
taught
Grade
2
at
the
Hunnewell
School
from
September
1979
until
the
end
of
the
 1981‐1982
school
year.

In
September
1982,
Diane
began
28
consecutive
years
as
a
Grade
4
 teacher,
first
at
the
Warren
School,
and
then
at
the
Schofield
School
from
September
1986
 until
the
present.


Along
the
way,
Diane
served
Wellesley
Public
Schools
in
many
capacities
 that
were
beyond
the
scope
of
her
classroom.

Diane
has
served
as
a
staff
representative
for
the
 Wellesley
Teachers
Association,
as
well
as
on
the
WTA
Health
and
Safety
Committee.
At
the
district
 level,
Diane
has
served
on
many
curriculum
review
committees,
and
has
received
Curriculum
and
Instruction
funding
to
 3
    • create
curriculum
for
utilization
across
the
district.
Diane
also
served
as
Grade
Level
Leader
for
many
years.
At
the
 building
level,
Diane
has
served
as
a
staff
representative
on
school
councils,
and
contributed
her
insights
and
expertise
 as
a
member
of
Teacher
Support
Teams.

People
participate
in
and
contribute
to
the
types
of
activities
noted
above
for
a
 variety
of
reasons.
In
Diane's
case,
she
always
did
so
for
the
same
reason…
her
deep
sense
of
commitment
and
 compassion
for
the
well
being
of
others.


Diane
places
the
highest
value
on
the
personal
and
professional
relationships
 she
has
developed
throughout
her
career.
Diane
has
been
honored
in
many
ways,
including
as
a
semi‐finalist
for
 Massachusetts
Teacher
of
the
Year.
However,
I
know
that
nothing
has
brought
Diane
greater
joy
than
having
the
 opportunity
to
teach
the
children
of
former
students.
For
Diane,
caring
and
compassionate
relationships
have
always
 been
paramount.

Diane,
you
have
more
than
earned
your
place
in
the
sun.
As
you
enjoy
many
moments
of
quiet
 solitude
and
reflection
in
the
days
ahead,
please
remember
to
include
in
your
thoughts
that
the
warmth
of
the
sun
also
 shines
down
upon
countless
others
whose
lives
have
been
enriched
as
a
result
of
your
caring
and
compassionate
 presence
in
their
lives.
 
 
 
 CAROL
GREGORY,
Assistant
Superintendent.


In
Carol's
career
as
an
educator
 throughout
Massachusetts,
Carol
has
been
a
physical
education
specialist,
house
teacher,
computer
 science
teacher,
vice
principal,
middle
school
principal,
and
central
office
administrator.

In
these
 different
roles
she
has
had
a
myriad
of
varying
responsibilities.

I
believe
she
is
as
proud
of
her
very
long‐ tenure
as
a
teacher
union
president
as
she
is
of
her
work
as
a
successful
negotiator
on
the
behalf
of
 several
school
districts.


The
Wellesley
Public
Schools
has
had
the
honor
of
representing
the
capstone
of
 Carol's
illustrious
35‐year
long
professional
career
in
education.


It
is
hard
to
believe
Carol
has
been
here
just
three
 years.

During
that
time
she
has
successfully
negotiated
five
school
contracts
through
challenging
issues
and
economic
 times.

She
has
almost
single
handedly
put
all
of
our
educator
database
systems
in
order
so
that
we've
reached
an
 unprecedented
level
of
compliance.

Her
experience
in
human
resources
has
greatly
enhanced
our
capacity
to
advise
 educators
through
the
important
but
often
times
complicated
processes
of
licensure
and
re‐licensure.
The
 aforementioned
were
all
tried
and
true
strengths
of
Carol's
professional
portfolio
when
she
arrived
in
Wellesley.

New
to
 her
experience
was
the
management
of
facilities.


With
what
we
now
know
is
part
of
Carol's
characteristic
aplomb,
 Carol
invested
long
hours
learning
everything
she
could
about
matters
related
to
facilities.

Her
learning
experience
was
 complete
and
practical.
She
walked
on
roofs.
She
perused
online
equipment
catalogues.
She
inspected
boiler
room
 equipment.
She
asked
a
lot
of
questions
and
read
books
about
boilers.
As
a
result,
Carol
now
knows
the
nooks
and
 closets,
the
nuts,
bolts,
shingles
and
shades
of
our
ten
buildings
equally
as
well
as
our
custodians
do.
She
walked
the
 walk
so
she
could
ably
represent
our
needs
with
the
School
Committee,
architects,
construction
workers,
and
the
 Permanent
Building
Committee.

We
knew
when
Carol
arrived
she
brought
with
her
strengths
around
human
resources
 and
as
an
educator.

But
what
she
has
been
able
to
achieve
with
respect
to
her
role
in
facilities
far
surpassed
our
 expectations:
from
co‐supervising
a
new
facilities
director,
monitoring
five
elementary
school
renovation
projects,
 closing
out
the
Middle
School
renovation
project
to
representing
the
School
Department
at
the
high
school
construction
 planning
and
site
meetings.


Carol's
genuine
interest
in
people
and
her
gentle
style
have
helped
to
make
Central
Office
 warm
and
welcoming.
A
habitual
early
bird,
her
workday
begins
well
before
the
formally
established
start
time,
even
on
 the
heels
of
a
prior
evening
meeting.

In
retirement
she
will
likely
maintain
her
early
morning
habits,
not
at
her
 computer
or
telephone,
but
instead,
we
think,
on
the
golf
course.

So,
hear
us
now:
fore!
Carol's
playing
through.
 
 
 4
    • 
 
 ANN
HOFFMAN,
Fitness
and
Health
Teacher,
has
worked
in
Wellesley
for
17
years,
beginning
as
a
 part‐time
and
long‐term
substitute
both
at
Bates
and
at
Hunnewell.


When
she
accepted
a
full‐time
position
it
was
as
a
 physical
education
teacher
at
Hunnewell,
and
she
never
looked
back.
Ann
is
very
dedicated
to
the
school
community
at
 Hunnewell,
always
extending
herself
for
parents,
students
and
staff.

She
has
been
a
valued
member
of
many
 committees
over
the
years
to
better
serve
Wellesley
schools.


With
her
“Can
Do”
spirit,
Ann
has
served
as
the
 "unofficial"
curriculum
leader
for
the
elementary
fitness
and
health
staff.
She
has
mentored
many
 student
teachers
as
well
as
new
members
of
our
elementary
staff.

She
has
also
chaired
many
C
&
I
 workshops
designed
to
improve
instruction
and
present
innovative
programs
for
the
elementary
 students
of
Wellesley.
As
a
life
long
learner,
Ann
was
constantly
involved
in
professional
 development
activities
and
workshops.


Ann
is
well
known
for
her
wonderful
Juggling
Club
at
the
 Hunnewell
School.
To
see
her
students
in
action
speaks
volumes
to
her
tenacity
and
her
positive
 spirit
of
never
giving
up
on
a
student
or
a
skill.

This
is
reflected
in
two
quotes
she
holds
 dear..."Excellence
doesn't
just
happen,
it's
a
decision
you
make
every
day"
and
"do
your
best
and
 never
give
up."

Ann
has
proudly
served
the
physical
education
profession
beyond
Wellesley
as
well.
 She
served
with
the
Massachusetts
Association
for
Health,
Physical
Education,
Recreation
and
Dance
 (MAHPERD)
as
Vice
President
for
Physical
Education
and
also
on
the
Finance
Committee
and
Governor's
Council
for
 Physical
Fitness
and
Sport.
She
was
the
2001
MAHPERD
Elementary
Teacher
of
the
Year
and
presented
many
workshops
 at
MAHPERD
conventions.
Ann
is
known
throughout
the
physical
education
community
to
be
a
master
of
meaningful
 lessons
in
small
spaces.

Overall,
Ann
is
a
dedicated
professional
committed
to
her
school
and
community,
who
worked
 tirelessly
to
present
the
best
learning
experiences
for
students
in
fitness
and
health.

She
will
be
sorely
missed!



 
 
 
 Madeline
Kalotkin,
Speech/Language
Pathologist,
has
been
a
pioneer
in
the
field
of
special
 education
and
speech
and
language
pathology.
Having
completed
her
25th
year
in
the
Wellesley
Public
Schools,
all
at
 the
high
school,
she
has
been
an
integral
force
in
creating
and
developing
the
 language
program.
She
was
instrumental
in
formulating
this
successful
model.
 Madeline's
devotion
to
providing
the
best
educational
programs
to
students
 identified
with
a
language
base
learning
disability
is
to
be
admired.

She
made
sure
 that
all
students
had
access
to
the
curriculum
and
were
successful.
Madeline
has
 also
been
actively
involved
in
the
Wellesley
Teachers
Association
for
20
years
and
 has
been
on
the
negotiating
team
for
over
15
years.


Madeline
began
her
career
as
 a
part
time
speech
and
language
pathologist
and
provided
services
for
language
‐ disabled
students
at
the
high
school.

As
the
student
needs
increased,
she
was
hired
full
time
and
worked
to
develop
the
 language
program.

She
was
instrumental
in
starting
a
co‐teaching
model
in
chemistry
and
infused
language
strategies
 into
the
teaching
of
this
course.
With
the
success
of
this
model,
she
worked
with
the
English
department
to
help
develop
 the
Foundations
of
English
program.
Her
innovation
at
that
time
was
the
beginning
of
differentiated
instruction.
Over
 the
years,
this
model
has
continued
to
serve
students
well
and
allow
them
to
be
successfully
included
at
Wellesley
High
 School.
She
is
an
expert
at
adapting
curriculum
so
that
students
with
a
variety
of
learning
challenges
can
successfully
 learn
and
grow
within
the
confines
of
Wellesley
High
School.
As
Madeline
leaves
the
high
school,
she
will
be
 remembered
for
her
dedication,
innovative
programming,
and
her
devotion
to
her
students
and
their
success
in
high
 school
and
beyond.
 5
    • Roberta
Maguire,
Kindergarten
Teacher,
retirement
this
year
concludes
 seventeen
years
as
a
primary
grade
teacher
split
between
the
Hunnewell
and
Sprague
elementary
 schools.
These
years
followed
fifteen
years
as
a
preschool
and
elementary
school
teacher
in
 Maryland,
Virginia,
Brookline
and
Ashland.

It
is
apropos
to
share
that
Roberta's
last
role
before
 coming
to
teach
in
Wellesley
was
to
run
a
preschool
called
the
“Magic
Years”
but
she
has
 continued
to
spread
the
magic
of
primary
learning
in
the
years
since
her
arrival.


Roberta
has
 taught
a
multi‐grade
K‐1
almost
every
year
she
has
taught
in
Wellesley.
I
think
many
generations
 of
entering
kindergarten
students
would
say
it
was
dream
come
true
to
be
assigned
to
Mrs.

Maguire's
Kindergarten
but
 to
have
her
even
a
second
year
was
to
be
in
heaven.
Roberta
is
an
extraordinarily
talented
primary
grade
teacher
who
 brought
all
of
her
experience,
reflective
habits,
intellect,
and
heart
to
how
she
constructed
her
classroom.

How
her
 classroom
is
laid
out
to
how
every
lesson
is
designed
is
deliberated
constructed
to
guide
her
students
to
acquisition
of
 skills
and
develop
into
self‐directed
learners.

Roberta
is
just
about
the
most
thoughtful
teacher
I
know.

Roberta
has
 always
been
a
highly
respected
and
admired
colleague
among
all
of
the
teachers
in
the
district.

She
has
been
an
 incredible
role
model
for
novice
and
veteran
teachers
alike.
She
has
always
been
a
self‐directed
learner
who
continually
 explored
ways
to
improve
her
effectiveness
with
students.
She
has
never
been
afraid
to
express
concern
and
advocate
 for
changes
that
might
make
a
positive
differences
in
student
learning.
She
has
helped
students
with
very
diverse
needs
 be
successful
and
grow
beyond
anyone's
expectations
but
her
own.


Roberta
has
established
strong
relationships
with
 families
and
students
that
often
continue
long
after
students
have
moved
on
to
different
phases
of
their
academic
 experience.

She
has
mentored
many
a
new
teacher
and
has
provided
sage
counsel
to
many
a
veteran
teacher.
Words
 cannot
truly
express
how
appreciative
we
are
for
the
privilege
it
has
been
to
have
you
be
a
part
of
the
Wellesley
Public
 Schools
these
past
years.
Thank
you
for
seventeen
years
in
Wellesley
and
congratulations
for
your
32
years
overall
as
an
 educator!
 Dianne
McCarthy,
Kindergarten
Teacher.

Dianne
has
been
a
kindergarten
teacher
at
Fiske
for
the
 past
18
years.
When
I
think
about
kindergarten,
I
think
about
Dianne
and
her
McKids.
Dianne
finds
joy
in
the
littlest
 things
the
children
do.
She
has
given
hundreds
of
lucky
students
their
first
taste
of
school.
Dianne
has
combined
her
 warm
nurturing
style
with
her
strong
knowledge
of
child
development
to
create
an
 environment
that
is
stimulating
and
secure
for
children:
Diane's
child
centered
 classroom
buzzes
with
sounds
of
exploration
and
discovery.
Not
only
are
her
students
 taught
to
become
responsible
classroom
members,
but
they
are
provided
with
choices
 to
enable
them
to
become
responsible
learners
as
well.
Dianne's
classroom
is
a
 wonderful
learning
environment
where
all
children
are
valued
and
made
to
feel
special.


 Dianne
exemplifies
that
being
a
teacher
does
not
end
at
the
close
of
the
school
day.
She
 frequently
takes
our
less
advantaged
and
ELL
children,
with
or
without
their
families,
to
 school
functions.
Dianne
selflessly
does
this
because
of
how
much
she
cares
for
the
 children
and
because
of
her
deep
compassion
for
them.

I
don't
think
I
can
recall
a
school
function
that
Dianne
attended
 without
at
least
one
of
her
McKids.

Dianne's
sense
of
grace
and
style
has
served
us
we ll.
You
can
count
on
Dianne
when
 you
have
an
etiquette
question
or
when
you
need
something
to
look
just
right.

Dianne
always
has
that
special
touch.


 When
Dianne
announced
her
retirement,
many
families
woefully
exclaimed,
“She
can't!
She
needs
to
wait.

My
family
 hasn't
all
had
her
yet.”
This
is
a
tribute
to
the
high
regard
and
affection
that
families
have
for
her.

Thank
you
for
being
 that
unassuming,
outstanding
educator
that
you
have
been
all
these
years.
You
have
touched
many
lives
and
have
made
 a
difference!
 6
    • Lynn
Moore‐Benson,
Director
of
Technology.


It
is
our
extreme
good
fortune
that
Lynn
Moore
 Benson's
43‐year
career
in
education
was
spent
here
in
the
Wellesley
Public
Schools.

More
than
fortunate,
we
were
 lucky.

Lynn's
arrival
in
Wellesley
almost
didn't
happen.
After
graduating
from
Vanderbilt
in
Nashville,
 Tennessee,
Lynn
was
hired
to
teach
French
here
in
Wellesley.

The
fact
that
Lynn's
college
professor
 edited
the
French
textbook
used
at
the
middle
school
and
high
school
combined
with
her
very
 successful
phone
interview
in
French
resulted
in
her
appointment.

Ready
to
begin
her
new
life,
 Lynn
packed
her
belongings
and
drove
her
car
from
Nashville
to
Cambridge
only
to
have
all
her
 belongings
stolen
out
of
her
car
the
evening
she
arrived.
Knowing
Lynn
you
can
guess
the
rest
of
 the
 story.
Undeterred,
Lynn
flew
back
to
Nashville
the
next
day,
replenished
her
wardrobe
and
arrived
 back
in
Wellesley
to
begin
her
career.
What
most
people
find
an
overwhelming
obstacle,
Lynn
finds
a
challenge
to
 overcome.


Lynn's
tenure
as
a
teacher
of
French
is
legend.
She
has
shared
her
love
of
French
with
thousands
of
 students,
some
of
whom
now
teach
in
Wellesley.

Knowledge
of
her
excellence
extended
beyond
Wellesley
when
Lynn
 was
selected
as
Massachusetts
Teacher
of
the
Year.

Paving
the
way
for
the
use
of
technology
in
the
Classical
and
 Modern
Languages
Department,
Lynn
piloted
the
use
of
early
versions
of
AVID
movie
software
as
a
teaching
tool
for
her
 classes
and
early
forms
of
interactive
software
with
her
students.


In
fact,
technology
became
such
an
important
part
of
 Lynn's
practice
she
began
working
with
technology
fulltime
and
succeeded
Tom
Platti
as
the
K‐12
Director
of
 Technology.

Lynn's
attraction
to
technology
comes
from
her
ability
to
see
the
varied
and
powerful
ways
it
enriches
 teaching
and
learning,
and
from
her
desire
to
share
that
information
with
teachers.

If
you
happen
to
speak
with
Lynn
 after
she
attends
a
demonstration
of
an
emerging
technology,
you
find
yourself
enthralled.
Lynn
gives
you
a
glimpse
of
 the
future.

You
walk
away
feeling
energized
and
hungry
for
more.

Whether
she
is
planning
a
pilot
program
for
 SmartBoards,
student
responders
or
netbooks,
Lynn
is
always
a
step
ahead.

While
teachers
are
using
new
flip
cameras
 to
create
digital
records
of
student
work,
Lynn
is
considering
how
cameras
that
record
holographic
images
might
 enhance
a
teacher's
practice.


Lynn
often
comments
that
she
finds
life
fascinating.

We're
glad
you
found
your
life
in
 Wellesley
fascinating,
Lynn.
Your
intellectual
curiosity,
competence,
boundless
energy
and
joie
de
vivre
have
enriched
 us.

Your
legacy
lives
on.
 
 Beth
Pullman,
Special
Education
Teacher,
has
been
a
special
educator
at
Fiske
for
21
years.

During
 those
years
her
commitment
to
children
has
not
wavered.
You
can
count
on
Beth
to
advocate
for
 what
is
best
for
children.

Beth
is
passionate
about
her
work,
and
her
desire
to
have
all
children
 succeed.
She
provides
a
safe
nurturing
environment
for
children
to
go
to
and
feel
good
about
 themselves
as
learners.
She
is
compassionate
and
empathetic
which
has
enabled
her
to
be
able
 to
develop
positive
relations
with
students
that
have
fostered
social
and
intellectual
 development.


Beth
is
a
reflective,
continuous
learner.
She
holds
high
standards
for
herself,
as
well
as
for
students,
and
 even
during
her
last
year
continues
to
seek
out
professional
development
to
learn
new
ways
to
support
and
understand
 children
and
their
learning.
Her
knowledge
and
skills
are
impressive.
Beth
spearheaded
the
implementation
of
David
 Hyerle's
Thinking
Maps
into
our
school.
Due
to
Beth'
s
vision,
Thinking
Maps
is
currently
a
Fiske
initiative
across
the
 grade
levels.


Beth's
love
of
photography
has
enhanced
our
school.
Her
incredible
picture
of
Fiske
is
used
on
our
 certificates,
letters,
book
covers,
etc.
Her
love
of
technology
has
produced
a
supportive,
accessible
learning
environment
 for
students.
Due
to
Beth's
efforts,
Fiske
was
awarded
a
competitive
Lighthouse
Grant
in
technology
and
became
a
 demonstration
school
for
Soliloquy,
now
known
as
Reading
Assistant.

Beth
is
highly
respected
by
her
colleagues,
 students
and
parents.
She
has
often
served
as
the
“go
to
person”
in
the
principal's
absence.
She
will
do
whatever
needs
 to
be
done
to
help
student
learning
or
the
Fiske
Community.
She
is
truly
a
remarkable
educator
who
has
given
many
 students
the
gifts
of
confidence,
self‐esteem
and
success.

 7
    • 
 Marcia
Robinson,
School
Psychologist,
has
been
a
school
 psychologist
in
Wellesley
for
26
years.

She
has
been
in
the
field
for
43
years!

Prior
 to
her
work
in
Wellesley's
preschool,
Middle
School
and
at
Hardy,
Marcia
worked
at
 Children's
Hospital
and
in
the
public
schools
of
Lexington
and
Medway.


As
if
 maintaining
the
role
of
school
psychologist
was
not
enough
for
that
duration,
Marcia
 also
taught
graduate
school
courses
in
psychology
at
Boston
State,
UMass,
 Northeastern
and
Lesley
University.

Additionally,
Marcia
piloted
numerous
 programs
for
Wellesley
College
and
Families
First
and
has
been
a
consultant
for
the
 Open
Circle
program
since
its
earliest
stages.

Marcia's
colleagues
describe
her
 professional
energy
level
first
by
the
brisk
pace
of
her
heels
clicking
down
the
hall,
 then
by
listing
all
of
the
many
attributes
of
her
work
which
they
value
including
her
commitment
to
preserving
the
 natural
progression
of
children's
development,
her
listening
and
presentation
skills,
her
masterful
ability
to
convey
even
 difficult
information
to
parents
in
an
compassionate
manner
and
her
sense
of
humor
which
is
often
used
to
support
 hard
working
colleagues.

One
does
not
need
to
spend
long
with
Marcia
before
realizing
that
perhaps
her
greatest
 career‐long
interest
and
investment
has
been
her
vision
of
supporting
students
and
educators
in
developing
structures
 and
strategies
for
building
prosocial
skills
in
young
learners.

Marcia's
ongoing
work
with
Open
Circle,
her
work
with
 Hardy
Teachers
to
write
curriculum
around
Bullying,
Teasing
and
Relational
Aggression,
many
custom‐made
programs
 for
Hardy's
children
and
families
are
all
testaments
to
her
vision
of
an
emotionally
healthy
school
community.

Although
 Marcia
is
retiring
from
Wellesley
Public
Schools,
ever
the
life‐long
learner,
she
plans
to
continue
to
improve
lives
of
 children
and
families
through
ongoing
work.

Marcia's
outstanding
talent
at
listening
and
counseling
has
yielded
lasting
 results.

Her
ways
of
helping
children
and
adults
to
be
resilient,
more
capable
and
to
feel
better
is
important
work
and
a
 significant
legacy.

As
Maya
Angelou
said,
“People
will
forget
what
you
said.

People
will
forget
what
you
did.

But
people
 will
never
forget
how
you
made
them
feel.”

Thank
you
for
making
us
all
feel
informed,
supported
and
cared
for.

You
 will
be
missed.
 
 JEFFREY
WILLIAMS,
Department
Head,
Special
Education.



Picture
a
 small
windowless
office
in
the
bottom
floor
of
a
building.

And
then
picture
some
old
furniture,
 a
bit
shabby.

Nothing
about
this
small
office
space
should
have
made
anyone
feel
comfortable
 or
relaxed.

But
now,
picture
Jeff
Williams,
many
years
ago
in
1982,
in
that
office.

Anyone
who
 walked
in
that
office
felt
instantly
cared
about,
relaxed,
comfortable
and
safe,
just
because
Jeff
 Williams
was
there.

It
has
never
mattered
where
Jeff
is;
it
matters
that
Jeff
is
there.

From
the
 beginning
of
Jeff's
career
in
Wellesley,
it's
been
clear
that
Jeff's
commitment
to
students
is
second
to
none.

Jeff
has
that
 wonderful
innate
ability
to
show
an
intense
interest
in
the
student
and
discover
what
is
important
to
him
or
her.

He
has
 been
known
to
seek
out
opportunities
for
students
to
capitalize
on
their
interests
and
engage
even
the
most
disengaged
 student.


Jeff
began
his
career
in
Wellesley
as
an
adjustment
counselor
and
in
1996
became
the
Special
Education
 Department
Head.

Dorsey
Yearly,
former
Director
of
Student
Services,
saw
his
leadership
talent
and
convinced
him
to
 take
on
this
role.

Jeff
agreed,
but
only
with
the
promise
made
to
him
that
he
could
continue
to
provide
direct
 counseling
services
to
students.
Despite
the
incredible
demands
of
his
Department
Head
position,
he
has
never
stopped
 being
a
counselor.

So
many
students
have
benefited
from
Jeff's
compassion
and
care.

As
a
Special
Education
 Department
Head,
Jeff
is
beloved
by
students,
families,
and
colleagues.

With
his
intuitive
understanding
of
others'
 needs,
he
has
led
his
department
for
the
past
14
years.

His
ability
to
bring
people
together
so
that
no
one
feels
they
sit
 on
“the
other
side
of
the
table”
speaks
to
his
strengths
as
a
collaborative
leader.

He
is
genuinely
interested
in
another
 8
    • point
of
view
and
respectively
brings
a
group
to
consensus,
always
keeping
the
focus
on
the
student's
best
interest.

 Replacing
Jeff
is
impossible.

He
is
one
of
a
kind.

When
he
leaves,
his
legacy
will
stay
behind
him
in
Wellesley
‐
the
 legacy
of
an
educator
who
has
truly
and
deeply
cared
about
all
students.

We
wish
Jeff
well.

He
will
be
sorely
missed.
 
 ******************************************************
 
 
 
 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
 2010‐2011
OPENINGS
 
 HIGH
SCHOOL
 Earth
Science
Teacher
(.5FTE)
 
 HIGH
SCHOOL
 Health
Teacher

(.2FTE)
 Please
send
a
cover
letter,
resume,
three
letters
of
reference,
transcripts,
and
licensure
by
4
p.m.
on
June
18,
2010
to
Carol
A.
 Gregory,
Asst.
Supt.,
Wellesley
Public
Schools,
40
Kingsbury
Street,
Wellesley,
MA

02481.


 MIDDLE
SCHOOL
 French
Teacher
(.4
FTE)
 Please
send
a
cover
letter,
resume,
three
letters
of
reference,
transcripts,
and
licensure
by
4
p.m.
on
June
25,
2010
to

 Carol
A.
Gregory,
Asst.
Supt.,
Wellesley
Public
Schools,
40
Kingsbury
Street,
Wellesley,
MA

02481.

 Full‐
time
Speech
and
Language
Pathologist
needed
at
Middle
School
to
fill
a
maternity
leave
for
school
year
2010‐11.
 Responsibilities
include
evaluation,
providing
direct
services
to
individuals
and
small
groups
of
students,
consultation
to
teachers,
 and
social
skills
instruction.
Please
send
cover
letter,
resume,
three
letters
of
reference,
licensure
and
transcripts
to
 Jeff_Williams@wellesley.k12.ma.us
and/or
Personnel,
Wellesley
Public
Schools,
40
Kingsbury
Street,
Wellesley,
MA
02481
 
 
 Wellesley
Public
Schools
Actively
Seeks
to
Increase
the
Diversity
of
its
Workforce
 
 
 Coaching
Positions



 
 Fall
Season
2010‐11
 Coach:



Freshman
Field
Hockey
 Contact
Athletic
Director


John_Brown@wellesley.k12.ma.us
 9