Chapter 8
Shaping
Fixed-outcome shaping with an escape contingency: Ronald Republican and his “significant other,”
Debbie ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter 8 online materials

18,332 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
18,332
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16,755
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 8 online materials

  1. 1. Chapter 8 Shaping Fixed-outcome shaping with an escape contingency: Ronald Republican and his “significant other,” Debbie Democrat are listening to NPR's Diane Rehm show, when he hears her guest enthuse about what a truly great American president Bill Clinton was. Ronald angrily shouts at Debbie, “Turn that damned thing off.” But she ignores him and he requests in a more reasonable voice, “Turn that damned thing off,” which Debbie does. Next time around, Debbie only answers such requests when he adds, “please.” And finally she raises the criterion one more level, and removes the aversive stimulus only when Ronald pleasantly requests, “Debbie, would you mind turning off the radio?” Shaping with a fixed outcome (more or less the same aversive quality of left-wing NPR praise for great democrats) as the escape contingency required Ronald’s request to more and more closely approximate civility--fixed-outcome shaping with an escape contingency. (I know, you think Ronald should have turned off the damned radio himself; but after all, he is a republican.) Variable-outcome shaping with an escape contingency: Ronald Republican is driving his Cadillac Seville down the road, listening to NPR's Diane Rehm show, when he hears her guest enthuse about what a truly great American president Bill Clinton was. Without taking his eyes from the road, Ronald gropes for the radio’s off switch. And each time he's offended by a message from his car radio his grope for the off switch becomes a little more accurate. Shaping with a variable outcome of having to listen to less and less of that aversive blather, as he escapes by hitting the off switch with increasing accuracy. Fixed-outcome shaping with a punishment contingency: Whenever Ronald would say something like, “I think George Bush did a wonderful job saving democracy from the 'terrorists,'" Debbie would foam at the mouth and shout back, "I wish George W. had found his own Monica Lewinski, so the democrats could have impeached him." But, if Ronald hedged a bit with, "Some people say George Bush did a wonderful job saving democracy from the 'terrorists,'" Debbie would let it slide. However, as Ronald became increasingly constrained in his Bush nostalgia, Debbie became increasingly intolerant and, once again, would rewrite history with her impeachment fantasy. Until eventually, Ronald's political statements were reduced to an occasional, "I wonder what old George is doing these days." Shaping with a fixed outcome (more or less the same aversive response from Debbie) as the punishment contingency required Ronald's political statements to become increasingly bland. Variable-outcome shaping with a punishment contingency: Same scenario as with the fixed-outcome shaping, except, the more constrained Ron became in his Bush nostalgia, the less aversive his nostalgic remarks were for Deb and therefore the less viscously aversive were her aggressive retorts, descending from, her Lewinski fantasy to, “I can’t believe you said that,” to a mere, “Well, everyone’s entitled to their own opinion, now that Bush is out of the White House.” Shaping with a variable outcome (less violent aggression from Deb) as the punishment contingency caused Ron’s nostalgia to become increasingly bland. QUESTIONS 1. Fixed- and variable-outcome shaping—define them. 2. Fixed-outcome shaping and variable-outcome shaping—diagram two similar examples showing the difference and give an example to show the difference. 3. Fill in a table contrasting fixed- and variable-outcome shaping. And explain it.

×