Ch. 24 hw   7 e
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    Ch. 24 hw   7 e Ch. 24 hw 7 e Document Transcript

    • Name: ____________________ Instructor: _____________________ Grade: _____ Learning Opportunities: 35 Chapter 24 Conceptual Work Sheets for Rule Governed Behavior: Theory Where we’ve been… First, it might not hurt to review these definitions and principles and maybe even come back to them from time to time, as you go through this assignment. Definition: Concept Rule:  A description of a behavioral contingency Definition: Concept Behavioral Contingency:  The occasion(SD) for a response (behavior),  the response (behavior),  and the outcome of the response (behavior) Definition: Concept Contingency Control:  Direct control of behavior,  by a contingency,  without the involvement of rules. Definition: Principle Rules that are easy to follow:  Describe contingencies with outcomes that are,  both sizeable  and probable.  The delay isn’t crucial. Definition: Principle Rules that are hard to follow:  Describe contingencies with outcomes that are,  either too small (though often of cumulative significance)  or too improbable.  The delay isn’t crucial. Keep all of these concepts and principles in mind as you work on the following original examples and their contingencies. But first, we’ll show you a correct example to help you avoid the most common errors that students make when filling out their contingency. Ineffective Natural Contingency Before Behavior After Given level of health Exercise once for 30 minutes Infinitesim ally greater health Performance Management Contingency SD (Deadline) Before 9 PM Before Behavior After Will lose $5 on Friday Exercise once for 30 minutes Will not lose $5 on Friday Inferred Direct Acting Contingency Before Behavior After Fear loss of $5 Exercise once for 30 minutes Do not fear loss of $5
    • An erroneous example of a small but cumulative outcome that doesn’t control behavior well. NOTE: You will lose 5 points for each instance that you diagram an example that fails the response-unit test. The following contingency is often given as a natural contingency because we usually talk about many behaviors. You can state a rule as such that you will be performing the behavior several days a week, but when diagramming it you need to make sure the behavior passes the reinforceable response unit test. Before Behavior After I’m not healthy I exercise 4 times per week I am healthy 1. A Delayed Outcome that Controls Behavior I’m going to give some of my own examples, throughout this homework, to help you a little; but don’t just do a cheap imitation of my examples (I won’t be flattered). Come up with truly creative, original examples, hopefully real examples from your everyday life. I’d rather see a real example that you can’t get to work than a contrived, artificial, sleazy example that meets all the criteria but really has little to do with the real world. Incidentally, some of the examples might use avoidance-type contingencies, so we’ll include the SD box, just in case you need it for the deadline; but don’t use it if you don’t need it. What behavior test does this contingency fail on the pink criterion sheet? ________________________ Did you say the behavior fails the reinforceable response unit test? Your examples must involve a response unit—ONLY ANALYZE ONE INSTANCE OF BEHAVIOR IN YOUR DIAGRAM. 2. What behavior would not fail the response unit test? _________________ SD (Deadline): Before 3 PM Now that we have changed the behavior to a reinforceable response unit, what is wrong with the outcome “I am healthy?” Of course, one instance of the behavior won’t result in your becoming healthy, it will only result in your being infinitesimally healthier than before. 3. Before I will look like a big fool at 4 PM Please rewrite the diagram with the reinforceable response unit from #2 in the behavior box and with more appropriate infinitesimal before and after conditions. (If you are having trouble, then see page 1 for an example). Before Behavior 4. After Revised by Kelli Perry on 7/23/2009 -2- Behavior I prepare my lecture Your original example: After I won’t look like as big a fool at 4 PM
    • 5. First, whose behavior are you analyzing? ______________________ 6. Please fill out the contingency diagram describing your example. A probable, sizeable, but delayed outcome that doesn’t control the behavior of a normal, verbal, adult, though they want it to, if you can (for OAPs). SD (Deadline): Before Behavior After 7. 10. Your original example How long is the delay between the response and the outcome? ____________________________ 8. My example: I can’t; I don’t think there is such a thing. Tracy’s example: She eats shell fish even though it will definitely result in a bad stomach ache a half hour later. The answer is that it’s worth it. Was the delay greater than a few seconds? A. Yes (Great!) B. No (Then you probably need to redo your example) 11. First, whose behavior are you analyzing?____________________ Why? Because for many analogs to reinforcement, the delay between the response producing the outcome and the outcome itself, is too great for the outcome to reinforce that response. This is just the opposite of the requirements in the previous chapters; there I wanted the delay to be short enough so reinforcement or punishment could occur. 9. Does your example pass reinforceable- response unit test? 12. Please fill out the contingency diagram describing your example. Before Behavior the A. Yes (OK) B. No (Recycle city) Use the pink contingency-diagram checklist to analyze the example, except this time it should fail the sixty-second test! 13. Does your example pass reinforceable-response unit test? A. Yes (OK) B. No (Recycle City) Revised by Kelli Perry on 7/23/2009 After -3- the
    • An improbable outcome that doesn’t control behavior well. (Note: the change from the before to after, should be a small one.) A small, but cumulative outcome that doesn’t control behavior well. My example: I have a given level of dental hygiene  I floss my teeth once  I have infinitesimally better dental hygiene. My example: I have a low probability of injury I buckle up  I have an infinitesimally lower probability of injury. 14. Your original example: 18. Your original example: 15. First, whose behavior are you analyzing?____________________ [Hint: Most examples involve safety, (i.e., traffic, work, home or health and sexual safety); or they involve violations of the law. See PB for reasons why gambling, perhaps including Lotto, is not a pure example of improbable outcomes.] 16. Please fill out the contingency diagram describing your example. Before Behavior After 19. First, whose behavior are you analyzing?____________________ 20. Please fill out the contingency diagram describing your example Use the pink contingency-diagram checklist to analyze the example.! Before 17. Does your example pass reinforceable-response unit test? A. Yes (OK) B. No (Recycle City) Behavior After the Use the pink contingency-diagram checklist to analyze the example. 21. Does your example pass reinforceable-response unit test? A. Yes (OK) B. No (Recycle City) Revised by Kelli Perry on 7/23/2009 -4- the
    • A rule that’s easy to follow. A rule that is hard to follow. (In your example, use a delayed, high probability, sizable outcome) My example: In a traditional class, if you study a couple of hours every day, you will get a good grade on the mid-term and final and get a good final grade. My example: In Dr. Malott’s course, if you miss the fourth class your grade will automatically go down one half letter grade. 27. Your original example: SD (Deadline): Before class finishes Before I will lose ½ letter grade Behavior I come to class After I will not lose ½ grade 28. First, whose behavior are you analyzing?____________________ 22. Your original example: 29. Please fill out the contingency diagram describing your example Before Behavior After 23. First, whose behavior are you analyzing?____________________ 24. Please fill out the contingency diagram describing your example SD (Deadline): Before Behavior Use the pink contingency-diagram checklist to analyze the example. After 30. Does your example pass the reinforceable-response unit test? A. Yes (OK) B. No (Recycle City) 31. Show how your example fits the previously mentioned principle: Rules that are hard to follow (Hint: think of the definition). Use the pink contingency-diagram checklist to analyze the example. 25. Does your example pass reinforceable-response unit test? A. Yes (OK) B. No (Recycle City) the 26. Show how your example fits the previously mentioned principle: Rules that are easy to follow (Hint: think of the definition). Revised by Kelli Perry on 7/23/2009 -5-