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Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
Harriet tubman(lm)
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Harriet tubman(lm)

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  • 1. Harriet Tubman<br />The Moses of her People<br />Written by George Sullivan <br />Presentation by Lea Moore<br />
  • 2. 1. When Harriet was 6 years old, she was sent to work for a couple named Cook. She was terrified of the thought of leaving home and her family. “Life was harsh for Harriet”. She had to sleep on the kitchen floor and eat table scraps for her meals. She had to go outside to watch the traps her master had set for little animals.<br />4. As an adult, Harriet decided to flee from slavery, leaving her beloved husband behind. After she failed to persuade her brothers to flee with her, she decided to leave her brothers and venture out in the dark. Alone. <br />2. After the Cooks, Harriet was sent to the house of Miss Susan. Although Miss Susan was mean, and often beat Harriet for not keeping the baby from crying, Harriet persevered..<br />5. On her first journey in the Underground Railroad, Harriet approached the first house, not knowing what would happen to her. She faced the unknown with bravery.<br />3. As a teen working in the fields, Harriet once saw an overseer run after an escaping slave. She followed them into a store. When the slave tried to escape, the overseer commanded Harriet to hold the slave for a beating. Instead, she blocked the path of the overseer and got hit in the head with a lead weight the overseer intentionally aimed at the slave. She recovered, but suffered from severe headaches and black outs from then on.<br />8. When Harriet heard that her sister was in danger of being sole, she decided to go back and rescue her. Harriet was willing to risk her life for family and friends.<br />6. Searching for the next station, she traveled in the dark, (pitch black) and used the North Star as a compass, her only guide to freedom. She must have been frightened when she could have been at risk of being captured, alone in dark places she’d never been before. <br />9. Harriet returned to the South many times., disguised as a man. She didn’t know if she would be caught or if her husband would turn her in.<br />7. Finally in Pennsylvania, she made a a new home for herself. Harriet was a stranger to everyone and the city was an adjustment compared to the quiet of the country. <br />10. In the Civil War, asked to lead a small unit of black troops behind enemy lines, Harriet ran a great risk of being captured, injured or killed.<br />
  • 3. Blue: Goal-Oriented<br />At first, Harriet only dreamed she and her people would escape to freedom. But once she overheard stories of the Underground Railroad, she started thinking of the day she could make her escape. It was not until she was 28 that she was finally able to make that happen.<br />Harriet Tubman is to the far left<br />
  • 4. Green: Hopeful<br />Harriet was always hopeful that she and her people would be free, away from danger and mistreatment. Once free herself, she continued to hope that other slaves could be free as well.<br />
  • 5. Purple: Independent<br />On her first trip to freedom, Harriet traveled alone, in the dark, with only the North Star as her compass. She left her beloved husband and family behind, determined to have a better life for herself.<br />
  • 6. Yellow: Intelligent<br />On a trip South to help free slaves, Harriet found herself in a train station. Two men were nearby, trying to decide if she was the woman on the Wanted poster hanging on the wall. The men noted that Harriet was illiterate. Very calmly, Harriet picked up a book and pretended to read it. Her quick thinking saved her. <br />
  • 7. Orange: Inspiring<br />“I have reasoned this out in my mind. There was one of two things I had to do, liberty or death. If I could not have one, I would have the other for no man should take me alive. I should fight for my liberty, as long as my strength lasted, and when the time came for me to go, the Lord will take me.” Harriet was an inspiring person for her dignified humor and personality to set her goals and accomplish them.<br />
  • 8. Red: Courageous<br />Harriet was a massively courageous person with a will so strong, she achieved like no other. In addition to rescuing slaves, during the Civil War, she went behind enemy lines to gather information about Confederate forces. She also rescued hundreds of slaves so that Northern soldiers could destroy mines that the rebels had placed in the Combahee River in South Carolina.<br />
  • 9. The Underground Railroad Cafe’<br />Foods from Stops Along the Way <br />Desserts<br />Entrees<br />Baltimore Crab Cakes:$10.95<br />Charleston Peach Cobbler:$5.95<br />Fresh, ripe peaches in a flakey pie crust, topped with cinnamon and whipped cream.<br />Fresh Maryland crab meat with specially seasoned breadcrumbs, served fried or broiled.<br />New York Cheesecake:$6.75<br />Creamy cheesecake with a graham cracker crust and sour cream topping.<br />Philadelphia Cheese Steak:$7.95<br />Thinly sliced pieces of flavorful steak, onion and melted cheese on a hoagie roll.<br />Beverages<br />Boston Scrod:$9.95 <br />Sun Drop:$1.50<br />The filet section of young codfish with buttered breadcrumbs and cheddar topping.<br />Buffalo Rock Gingerale:$1.50<br />Ale-8-One:$1.50<br />
  • 10. The reason I chose these symbols on the medal is because they played an important role in Harriet’s life. The star on the medal represents the North Star which guided Harriet as she was leading slaves north to freedom. The cross represents the important role faith played in the way Harriet lived her life. Finally, I selected the equal sign to symbolize Harriet’s belief that every slave should be treated the same as a free man. <br />The Human Spirit Award<br />
  • 11. Tired after her war service, Harriet settled in Auburn, NY in her later years. There, she enjoyed spending time in her large vegetable garden near her apple orchard, and continued to share what little she had with others.<br />
  • 12. I chosen this song because it was one of Harriet’s favorite songs that she sang and it connects to bringing the slaves to the Promised Land which was their new home. Harriet also sang this song when she was rescuing slaves.<br />Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,<br />Beyonce’ version<br />Swing low, sweet chariot,<br />Coming forth to, carry me, home, swing low, sweet sweet sweet chariot chariot, coming forth to carry me home yeah,<br />Swing down chariots wont you let me ride oh swing, stop and let me ride oh ride me rock me Lord,<br />Ooh hey I got some six white horses standin’ side by side <br />Oh, sing <br />Sing<br />Rock me, rock me <br />I got a home<br />Hey. <br />(The song continues but this only lasts for two minutes max.)<br />

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