Developing Beginning Fractions Concepts
    with Online Interactive Content

                    By Emily Starr




      ...
TABLE OF CONTENTS



    What is a fraction? .………………..……………………………….. 3

    Identifying and creating fractions .…………………………...
The website:
   http://www.teacherlink.org/content/math/interactive/flash/kidsandcookies/kidcookie.php



   Description: ...
3) Return to the beginning of the virtual manipulative and choose
   four kids and five oatmeal cookies.
      • Ask how f...
The website:
    http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_102_g_2_t_1.html



    Description: Teach the concept of numerato...
4) Select “New Whole” and have a student create 3/8 with a
                                       different shape.
       ...
The website:
    http://nationalstrategies.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/node/47750


    Description: Compare the relative size o...
The website:
    http://www.visualfractions.com/FindGrampy.html



    Description: Visualize the relative size of fractio...
The website:
    http://www.teacherlink.org/content/math/interactive/flash/Eggs/Eggs.html



    Description: Create a col...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Online Fraction Teaching Concepts

1,748

Published on

This is a free ebook that was shred by Starmatica

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,748
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Online Fraction Teaching Concepts

  1. 1. Developing Beginning Fractions Concepts with Online Interactive Content By Emily Starr For more interactive content information, visit: http://www.interactivecontentcorner.com Sponsored by: StarrMatica Learning Systems http://www.starrmatica.com
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS What is a fraction? .………………..……………………………….. 3 Identifying and creating fractions .…………………………... 5 Comparing the relative size of fractions …………………… 7 Visualizing the relative size of fractions …………………… 8 Finding a fraction of a group ……………………………………. 9 www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 2
  3. 3. The website: http://www.teacherlink.org/content/math/interactive/flash/kidsandcookies/kidcookie.php Description: Teach the concept of fractions by sharing cookies equally between several kids. Classroom applications: 1) Choose three kids and four chocolate cookies. • Introduce the concept of fractions to your class by asking them to figure out how to share four cookies evenly between three kids. Problem solving can be done as an individual, partner, or group activity. • Have your students share their answers. • Demonstrate the solution by giving each kid a cookie and using the cookie cutting board and cutter to cut the remaining cookie into three equal pieces. • Tell the students that they just created a fraction: one-third. Use this example as a springboard for discussing the meaning of a fraction. Share that a fraction is part of a whole, and demonstrate that three thirds equal one whole cookie. 2) Return to the beginning of the virtual manipulative and choose three kids and four oatmeal cookies. • Give each kid an oatmeal cookie and cut the remaining cookie into thirds. Ask your students what fraction of the remaining cookie each kid will be receiving. • Ask how the pieces are different from the thirds created with the chocolate cookie. Use this example as a springboard to discuss the fact that the same fraction can be shown with many different sizes & shapes. What is important is that a fraction is represented by an equal part of a whole. www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 3
  4. 4. 3) Return to the beginning of the virtual manipulative and choose four kids and five oatmeal cookies. • Ask how four kids could share five oatmeal cookies. Have your students share their answers. • Demonstrate the solution by giving each kid a cookie and using the cookie cutting board and cutter to cut the remaining cookie into four equal pieces. • Ask what fraction was created by cutting the cookie. Guide the students to write ¼ and discuss the meaning of each piece of cookie as one part out of four. • Repeat with your students by cutting cookies into fifths and sixths and discussing the meaning of each new part. www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 4
  5. 5. The website: http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_102_g_2_t_1.html Description: Teach the concept of numerators and denominators by shading shapes. Classroom applications: 1) Create the fraction 3/8 by dividing a shape into eight pieces and shading the first three pieces. • Ask the students what fraction you have created. Teach the vocabulary and meaning of the words numerator and denominator. • Note: Early on, many students may confuse the denominator as being the un-shaded pieces rather than the total number of pieces, so emphasize that the denominator represents the total number of pieces the whole is divided into. 2) Using the same shape, un-shade the first three pieces and shade the last three pieces. • Ask your students what fraction you have created. • Ask why it is the same fraction when you have shaded different pieces. Explain that any parts can be shaded to represent the numerator. You are still showing three parts out of eight. 3) Invite students to un-shade and shade the shape to show different ways of representing three eighths. • If the students don’t naturally introduce the topic with the parts they choose, shade three pieces of the shape that are not touching each other. • Ask your students if this shape is still representing 3 parts out of 8. • Explain that parts of a fraction do not need to be shaded next to one another. www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 5
  6. 6. 4) Select “New Whole” and have a student create 3/8 with a different shape. • Ask your students what conclusion they can draw from the fact that this shape is also showing 3/8. Guide them to understand that the same fraction can be represented by shading parts of wholes that are different sizes and shapes. 5) Use these websites to practice naming fractions and creating fractions. a. http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_103_g_2_t_1.html b. http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_104_g_2_t_1.html www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 6
  7. 7. The website: http://nationalstrategies.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/node/47750 Description: Compare the relative size of fractions with online fraction bars. Note: You will need to download one of the file types on this site to access the virtual manipulative. Classroom Applications: 1) Ask your students which fraction is larger ¼ or 1/6. Have them share their answers and explain their reasoning. • Put one whole fraction bar on the screen along with a fraction bar divided into fourths and a fraction bar divided into sixths. Highlight ¼ and 1/6 by clicking on one piece in each bar. • Explain that ¼ is larger than 1/6 because the whole is divided into a fewer number of pieces so each piece is larger. 2) Ask your students which fraction is larger 1/3 or 1/8. Have them share their answers and explain their reasoning. • Put one whole fraction bar on the screen along with a fraction bar divided into thirds and a fraction bar divided into eighths. Highlight 1/3 and 1/8 by clicking on one piece in each bar. • Explain that 1/3 is larger than 1/8 because the whole is divided into a fewer number of pieces so each piece is larger. 3) Ask your students to order these fractions from greatest to least: 1/5, 1/6, 1/3, 1/9. Have them share their answers and explain their reasoning. • Put one whole fraction bar on the screen along with fraction bars divided into thirds, fifths, sixths, and ninths. Explain that 1/9 is the smallest fraction and 1/3 is the largest fraction because the more parts the whole is divided into, the smaller each piece will be. 4) Close the lesson by using this website to demonstrate the varying size of 1/3 with the chocolate bar, water, pizza, and group of people. http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/numbers/fractiondecimalpercentage/fractions/introduction/flash2.shtml • Ask your students how all of these pictures can be showing 1/3 when the visual size of each part is different. Guide your students to the answer that the size of a fractional part depends on the size of the whole. • Then, demonstrate the size of 1/9 using all four objects. www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 7
  8. 8. The website: http://www.visualfractions.com/FindGrampy.html Description: Visualize the relative size of fractions by mentally dividing a rectangular hedge into the number of parts indicated by the denominator and estimating which part Grampy is hiding behind to determine the numerator. Classroom Applications: 1) Project this website’s image on a marker board or interactive whiteboard. • With a marker or virtual ink, divide the hedge into the number of pieces indicated by the denominator. • Ask your students to estimate which section of hedge Grampy is hiding at the end of. Have the students answer in one of two ways: a) Accept answer choices aloud and have students vote on which answer should be typed in the numerator box. b) Have your students each write an answer on an individual marker board and show their answers by holding the boards in the air. The most prevalent number is then entered in the numerator box. 2) Next, ask your students to mentally divide the hedge into the number of pieces indicated by the denominator and answer where Grampy is hiding. • Then, divide the hedge with a marker or virtual ink to demonstrate the answer, and type the correct number in the numerator box. www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 8
  9. 9. The website: http://www.teacherlink.org/content/math/interactive/flash/Eggs/Eggs.html Description: Create a colorful carton of eggs to demonstrate finding a fraction of a group. Classroom Applications: 1) Create a carton full of colorful eggs. • Ask your students to figure out what fraction of the eggs are specific colors. For example: What fraction of the eggs are pink? (The answer illustrated in this picture would be 3/12). • Ask how figuring out this fraction was similar to and different from finding a fraction of a whole that is split into parts. Lead your students to discover that they are finding a fraction of a group. • Ask your students to create a carton full of eggs to illustrate specific fractions of a group. For example: 3/12 yellow eggs, 5/12 pink eggs, and 4/12 green eggs. 2) Close the lesson by using this website to practice finding a fraction of a group. http://www.learningmedia.co.nz/staticactivities/online_activities/flitting_with_fractions/ • Project this website’s image on a marker board or interactive whiteboard. • Drag the requested butterflies into the jar and close the lid. • With a marker or virtual ink, number the butterflies inside the jar and outside the jar to help your students figure out what fraction of the group they have collected. • Input your answer on the site using the number buttons. • Continue catching butterflies and identifying the fraction of the group that is collected. www.interactivecontentcorner.com www.starrmatica.com Page 9

×