Rourke teaching models with ebooks

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eRead and Report:
The eContent solution to Increased Rigor and Metacognition

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Rourke teaching models with ebooks

  1. 1. E WN Teaching Models With Over 1,300 Titles Add Instructional Value to Your e-Book Collections! Our e-Book Teaching Models... • Provide Lessons that Teach Key Informational Text, Comprehension, and Content Vocabulary Strategies • Correlate to CCSS and State Standards • Support Text Complexity and Instructional Rigor How To Te ach: ATTRIB Summa UTES ry This lesso create th n will cover wh eir own ex at att amples of ributes are an GRADE using att d ho LEVEL Standard ributes in w to utilize them s: writing. in writing. The stude Common nt will be Core Stan able to ide Texas: 11 dards: W ntify attrib Virginia: 0.14 English; 110.1 .3.2; W.4.2; W utes in tex ts and 3.9; 4.7; 5 English .5.2; 5.7 ; 110.16 W.6.2; W. 7.2; English W.8.2 Materials : e-Book mo dels Content specific tex Sticky no t and art tes icles e-Book Models Little Bird ie Leveled •The Kin Readers g’s New 2-3 •Snakes Clothes in My Scien Third Grade ce Libra Eye to Ey •Seeds, ry 2-3 e Bees •Studying , and Pollen •Savanna with Endanger hs ed Habi Weather •Coral Re tats and Clima efs tes America n Symbo •The Sta ls tue of Lib and Landmarks Outdoo ert Lesson r Advent y •Campin ures Introducti g Attribute on: Great writ somethi s are adjectivesers use attribu the way ng. One exampl that can be us s in their writ te a specifi that something e of using attri ed to describ ing. somethi c color. When looks – such butes is to de e Engage stu feel” wha in a text it he writer uses atas spotted, str scribe ng a they can dents in a discu t has be lp tribu iped they can benefit writing. ssion about wh en writte s the reader to tes to describ , or use in wr iting. Have stu dents listat attributes are n. “see, ta e different an ste, and Instructio attributesd how authors n/Models: Now that who used let attribute ’s look at som Show ex s in their e ex writing. amples of students.amples in texts of (Students Beginnin his/her wr Have students de attributes. Read who are g iting. cide why a the auth few examples to new to th Find an or used att e topic) attribute ributes in What do used in (Students Intermed es it desc this book iate ribe? . The King who have Find an ’s New Cl some expe attribute Seeds, Be othe with the Why do rience us es, and Po s (p.7) topic) you thin ed in this book llen (p.7) to use th k th . at attribu e author chos make th te? Did e Sava e text m it nnahs (p Find an ore enga help to Studying .10) attribute ging? Weather (Students Advanced Why do us and Clim who need you thin ed in this book ates (p.1 2) more to us k the . material) challenging m e that attribute author chose ake the ? Did it text mor help to other at e engagi tributes this pass could yo ng? What Camping (p.8 ag engaging e to make it m u add to Coral Reef ) ? ore s (p.14) 1-800-38 0-2289 © 2013 • ww May be rep w.rourkeeducati roduced on for classr almedia.com oom use. Attributes_T eaching With eBo oks A global leader in technology, print, and distribution
  2. 2. •Snakes in Third Grade •Coral Reefs My Science Library 2-3 American Symbols and Landmarks •Seeds, Bees, and Models e-Book Pollen •The Statue of Liberty •Studying Weather and Climates Outdoor AdventuresWhat is Teaching with e-Books? Little Birdie Leveled Readers 2-3 •The King’s New Clothes •Savannahs •Camping Eye to Eye with Endangered Habitats •Snakes in Third Grade •Coral ReefsRourke Educational Library 2-3 Teaching with e-Books are a American Symbols and Landmarks focus on teaching the strategies Lesson My Science Media’s collection of lessons that •Seeds, Bees, and Pollen •The Statue of Libertyand skills students Weather and Climates •Studying need to be successful in reading, writing, and thestudents in aareas. Our collection of standards based Introduction: Great writers use attributes in their writing. Outdoor Adventures Engage content discussion about what attributes are and howe-Book lessons are created to drive instruction in the classroom while meeting the needs of all students. REM’s Attributes are adjectives that can be used to describe •Camping they can benefit writing. Have students list different attributes that something. One example of using attributes is to describe they can use in writing.Teachingway that something looksare a collection of K-2 and 3-8 standards based lessons that use our PDF e-Books and with e-Books lessons – such as spotted, striped, or the Lessonmodels. The color. When awhole uses attributes to describe the teacher uses PDF e-Books on a white board or with an LCD a specific lessons are writer group lessons, where Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at some examples of Engage authors who used attributes in their and how students in a discussion about what attributes are writing. something in lessonitincludes suggestions for instruction and independent practice at a Beginning, Intermediate, and Introduction: Greathelps the reader to “see,writing. and a text writers use attributes in their taste,projector.what has been written. can be used to describe Each feel” Attributes are adjectives thatusing attributes is to describe they can benefit writing. Have students list different attributes that something. One example of they can use in writing.Advanced level. that something looks – such as spotted, striped, or the way Show examples in texts of attributes. Read a few examples to a specific color. When a writer uses attributes to describe Instruction/Models:Have students at some why the author students. Now let’s look decide examples of used attributes in something in a text it helps the reader to “see, taste, and authorshis/her writing. who used attributes in their writing. feel” what has been written. Show examples in texts of attributes. Read a few examples to students. Have students decide why the author used attributes in Beginning Find an attribute used in this book. his/her writing. The King’s New Clothes (p.7) (Students who are new to the topic) What does it describe? Seeds, Bees, and Pollen (p.7) Beginning Find an attribute used in this book. The King’s New Clothes (p.7) (Students who are new to the topic) Intermediate What does attribute used in this book. Bees, and Pollen (p.7) Find an it describe? Seeds, Why do you think the author chose Savannahs (p.10) (Students who have some experience Intermediate Find an attribute used in this book. Why use that attribute? Did it help to to do you think the author chose Savannahs (p.10)Studying Weather and Climates (p.12) with the topic) (Students who have some experience with the topic) make the text more engaging? to use that attribute? Did it help to Studying Weather and Climates (p.12) make the text more engaging? Find an attribute used in this book. Find an attribute used in this book. Why do do you think the author chose Why you think the author chose Advanced Advanced to use that attribute? Did it help to help to to use that attribute? Did it make thethe text more engaging? What Camping (p.8) Camping (p.8) (Students who who need more challenging (Students need more challenging make text more engaging? What Coral Reefs (p.14) other attributes couldcould you add to Coral Reefs (p.14) material) material) other attributes you add to this passage to make it more this passage to make it more engaging? engaging? 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com Attributes_Teaching With eBooks © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Attributes_Teaching With eBooksRourke Educational Media’s Teaching with e-Books lessons focus on content areas needed to meet the standardsrequired for high stakes testing. Our Teaching with e-Books lessons focus on teaching Tier II & III vocabulary words andinformational text reading comprehension strategies (see list below). Reading Comprehension Strategies 1. Using and interpreting text features (graphs, charts, maps) 2. Determining importance or main idea and identifying key details 3. Synthesizing or summarizing complex concepts or processes 4. Visualizing 5. Making inferences 6. Making connections 7. Asking questionsRourke’s Teaching with e-Books lessons includes a concept focus, state standards, materials, suggested Rourkee-Books, a lesson, and extension activity. The purpose of our Teaching with e-Books program is to provide today’sstudents with the tools needed to achieve new knowledge and deeper levels of thinking.
  3. 3. How do I use Teaching with e-Books?Each Teaching with e-Books lesson is available online at www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com.1. A teacher will log onto www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com to get access to each Teaching with e-Books lesson.2. Once the teacher is logged in, the teacher will use the drop down menu which will allow them to select lessons by grade level, content area, or standard.3. After previewing the lesson and preparing any materials required for the lesson, the teacher is ready to teach the lesson to their students.4. Each lesson will begin with an introduction. The italicized words in each lesson are suggested prompts for the teacher. After introducing the concept or topic, the teacher will give examples and discussion prompts to students using the suggested e-Books. E-Books and suggested discussion prompts are listed by the following ability levels: Rookie- Students who are new to the topic Apprentice- Students who have some experience with the topic Skilled- Students who need more challenging material5. The application piece of the lesson includes directions and prompts for Rookie, Apprentice, and Skilled learners to apply what they have learned.6. After the teacher completes the lesson, they will assign the extension activity provided at the end of the lesson. The extension activity can be used in the classroom or assigned as homework.Teaching with e-Books LessonsLesson Types1. Using and Interpreting Text Features – text features include graphs, captions, diagrams, photos, illustrations, table of contents, glossary, and index. The student must be able to adequately examine and use each of these features to fully understand the entire text.2. Determining Importance or Main Ideas and Identifying Key Details – the student determines the purpose for reading the text and then decides what is most important in the text and what the key details are that help support the main idea.3. Synthesizing or Summarizing Complex Concepts or Processes – students, thinking evolves/changes as students gather information in the text. As they synthesize this new information, they form a new understanding of the text. Summarizing allows students to take all of the concepts presented in a text and create a clear and precise understanding in a few words or sentences.4. Visualizing – students create pictures in their minds (mental pictures). These images assist in making the reading come to life. This strategy helps readers to make the text more meaningful on a personal level. It also helps students gain a higher level of comprehension if they can visualize the concepts in the text.5. Making Inferences – students utilize their background knowledge /schema and clues from the text to derive ideas that are not provided explicitly in the text.6. Making Connections – utilizing their background knowledge/schema, students will make connections with the text. There are three different ways that students make connections: Text to Self – making a connection between the text and the reader’s personal experiences Text to Text – making connections between two different texts Text to World – making connections between a text and event occurring in the world7. Asking Questions – in order to become critical readers, students must ask thoughtful questions while they read. It is valuable in helping them to integrate information, discover new knowledge, and focus on important information in the text.
  4. 4. List of Teaching with e-Books Lessons AvailableLesson Type K-2 Lessons 3-8 LessonsAsking Questions X XAttributes XCaptions XCause and Effect X XComparisons XContrasting XDefinition Form XDetermining Importance X XHyperbole XMaking Connections X XMaking Inferences X XPhysical Science XPower, Authority, and XGovernanceSensory Details XSpecificity XStrong Verbs XSynthesizing or Summarizing X XComplex ConceptsUsing and Interpreting Text X XFeaturesUse a Variety of Beginning XTechniquesUse a Variety of Ending XTechniquesVisualizing X XVocabulary Development X X rourke@rourkeeducationalmedia.comCOMMON CORE rourkeeducationalmedia.com S TAT E S TA N D A R D S 800.394.7055 A global leader in technology, print, and distribution All Titles Aligned to CCSS
  5. 5. How to Teach: ASKING QUESTIONS GR A DE LEVEL K- 2SummaryThis lesson will teach students how to ask and answer questions about key details in a text using prompts such as who, what, when,where, how, and why. They will learn how asking questions and making inferences can help build their comprehension skills. Standards: Common Core Standards: RL.K.1; RL.1.1; RL.1.2; RL.2.1; RL.2.9; RL.3.1; RL.3.9 Texas: 110.11; 110.12; 110.13; 110.14 Virginia: K.9; 1.8; 2.8 Materials: eBook models Traditional versions of folktales, fairytales, tall tales, traditional rhymese-Book Models Little Birdie Leveled Readers K-1 • Charlie’s Harmonica • Who Stole The Veggies From The Veggie Patch? • Humpty Dumpty • We’re Going On A Dinosaur Dig Little Birdie Leveled Readers 2-3 • The Birdhouse That Jack Built • Lizzie Little, The Sky is Falling Little Birdie Leveled Readers 1-2 • Cinderella Zelda • Goldie Duck and The Three Beavers • The King’s New Clothes • Jill and the Beanstalk • The Three Billy Goats and Gruff • Old McDoggle Had A Zoo • Little Red Riding Hood • The Three Little Recyclers • Robin Hood • Itsy Bitsy Spider • Paul Bunyan • Little Miss Midge • RumpelstiltskinLessonIntroduction: To demonstrate reading comprehension, Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at this eBook. What imagestudents learn how to ask and answer questions. You can ask do you see on the cover? Can you tell me what you think thisand answer questions such as who, what, where, when, why, eBook will be about based on the cover and the title? Let’sand how. As you answer these questions, you will show that look through the eBook’s pages. Who do you think the mainyou understand the events that happened in the story. characters are? Why do you think this? Where is this story set? How do you know where the story is set?Engage students in a discussion about how they approach a new,unfamiliar book. Practice making inferences about the story’s plot by sharing several pages from the book with the students. Encourage them to predict what is happening on those pages. Have students decide why asking questions and making inferences about a book is an important reading strategy. Who Stole The Veggies From The Rookie Find the where, the setting of the story. How do Veggie Patch? (pg. 5-6) (Students who are new to the you know this is the setting? What clues do the We’re Going On A Dinosaur Dig topic) writer and the illustrator give you? (pg. 5-6) Apprentice After reading the story, can you tell me what is the The Three Little Recyclers (Students who have some plot of the story? Why do you think this is the plot? Little Miss Midge experience with the topic) Skilled Read the eBook. Does this eBook remind you of Little Red Riding Hood (Students who need more another book you’ve read? What has been changed Robin Hood challenging material) in the modern retelling? 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Asking Questions_Teaching With eBooks
  6. 6. Asking Questions Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• What is the purpose of making inferences about a book?• How does asking questions about a book, before and after you read it, help you understand the book?• Do illustrations help you understand the book? Tell me how the illustrations work to tell the story.Now that we’ve practiced asking questions about a book, let’s work in pairs to practice. Look through the eBook and askyour partner a new question about the book. Then, your partner will ask you a new question about the book. If they can’tanswer your question, help them find the answer in the bookApplication: We are now going to practice asking our own questions. The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (displays on whiteboard, LCD, or Rookie eReader). Let’s read this passage together. What do you think is going to (Students who are new to the topic) happen? What just happened? What do you think will happen next? The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (can either be displayed for whole Apprentice group or on individual computers). Let’s look at the traditional version and the new (Students who have some eBook version of the same story. How is the new plot and ending different than experience with the topic) the traditional version? The teacher selects the eBook for students to use. Find 2 examples of the same story, for example the Little Red Riding Hood story from China (Lon Po Po), the Skilled traditional western Little Red Riding Hood, and/or the eBook version of Little (Students who need more Red Riding Hood. Build a Venn Diagram that compares and contrasts the 2 challenging material) different versions of the tale. Ask and answer: How are the 2 stories similar? How are the 2 stories different? Is anything exactly the same in both versions?Extension ActivityShow What You Know! At home, build a shoe box diorama of the book. Be sure your diorama includes the correct setting,main characters, and action from the book.Or, rewrite the story. Ask yourself how you would like to give the story a new twist. What will you change? Then, write ordraw your new story. Share it with the class. See if they can guess which tale you’ve twisted! © Rourke Educational Media
  7. 7. How to Teach: ASKING QUESTIONS GR A DE L EVEL 3- 8SummaryThis lesson will teach students how to ask and answer questions about key details in a text. They will learn how asking questions andmaking inferences can help build their comprehension skills. Standards: Common Core Standards: RI.3.1; RI.3.2; RI.3.3; RI.4.1; RI.4.2; RI.4.3; RI.5.2; RI.5.3; RI.6.2; RI.6.3; RI.7.2; RI.7.3; RI.8.2; RI.8.3 Texas: 110.14; 110.15; 110.16; 110.18; 110.19; 110.20 Virginia: 3.6; 3.7; 4.6; 5.6; 6.6; 7.6; 8.6 Materials: Whiteboard or chalkboard eBooks Access to Internet for research or access to print encyclopediase-Book Models Eye to Eye with Endangered Habitats Let’s Explore Science • Coral Reefs • Understanding Biomes • Oceans • Restoring Wetlands Eye to Eye with Endangered Species • Sea Turtles • WhalesLesson Introduction: Let’s work on comprehension strategies! We will Instruction/Models: Let’s have a dialogue with the eBook to focus on asking questions for nonfiction texts. help us increase our reading comprehension. Engage students in a discussion about how they approach a new, unfamiliar book. Rookie The main idea is the central topic that the paragraph or book is about. Can you tell (Students who are new to the me the main idea of chapter one? Why did the author choose to focus the chapter topic) on that particular topic? Apprentice The author included bold words throughout the text. Those are words found in the (Students who have some glossary. Why did the author think those words were important enough to place in experience with the topic) bold and in the glossary? How does this help the reader? Let’s look at the organization of this eBook. How did the author choose to divide Skilled the chapters? What tools did the author add to help readers with this subject (Students who need more (captions, diagrams, maps)? How do these features add to the interest and detail of challenging material) the subject matter? 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Asking Questions_Teaching With eBooks
  8. 8. Asking Questions Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• What is the author’s purpose in writing the eBook?• Would you be able to understand the main idea without using graphic features like maps and diagrams?Application: Let’s create a KWL chart for this eBook. In the left column, we will list the things we know for sure about the topic.In the middle column, we will list the things we would like to know about the topic. In the right column, we will list the thingswe learned about the topic. Rookie As a class, let’s fill out the KWL chart together. (Students who are new to the topic) Apprentice (Students who have some Working with a partner, fill out the KWL chart. experience with the topic) Skilled In your reading journal or on a sheet of paper, fill out the KWL chart and (Students who need more then read the eBook on your own. challenging material)For all students, focus on the L column after reading the eBook: What did you learn from this book?Extension ActivityAfter completing the KWL chart and reading the entire ebook, students will write an expository paper (or paragraph) about the topic, usingdetails that they learned from the eBook. They can also use the Internet or encyclopedias to find additional supporting facts about the topic.Revise. Then type a clean copy of the expository paper/paragraph to turn in to the teacher and/or share with the class. © Rourke Educational Media
  9. 9. How To Teach: ATTRIBUTES GR A DE L EVEL 3- 8SummaryThis lesson will cover what attributes are and how to utilize them in writing. The student will be able to identify attributes in texts andcreate their own examples of using attributes in writing. Standards: Common Core Standards: W.3.2; W.4.2; W.5.2; W.6.2; W. 7.2; W.8.2 Texas: 110.14 English; 110.15 English; 110.16 English Virginia: 3.9; 4.7; 5.7 Materials: e-Book models Content specific text and articles Sticky notese-Book Models Little Birdie Leveled Readers 2-3 Eye to Eye with Endangered Habitats •The King’s New Clothes •Savannahs •Snakes in Third Grade •Coral Reefs My Science Library 2-3 American Symbols and Landmarks •Seeds, Bees, and Pollen •The Statue of Liberty •Studying Weather and Climates Outdoor Adventures •CampingLessonIntroduction: Great writers use attributes in their writing. Engage students in a discussion about what attributes are and howAttributes are adjectives that can be used to describe they can benefit writing. Have students list different attributes thatsomething. One example of using attributes is to describe they can use in writing.the way that something looks – such as spotted, striped, ora specific color. When a writer uses attributes to describe Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at some examples ofsomething in a text it helps the reader to “see, taste, and authors who used attributes in their writing.feel” what has been written. Show examples in texts of attributes. Read a few examples to students. Have students decide why the author used attributes in his/her writing. Beginning Find an attribute used in this book. The King’s New Clothes (p.7) (Students who are new to the topic) What does it describe? Seeds, Bees, and Pollen (p.7) Find an attribute used in this book. Intermediate Why do you think the author chose Savannahs (p.10) (Students who have some experience to use that attribute? Did it help to Studying Weather and Climates (p.12) with the topic) make the text more engaging? Find an attribute used in this book. Why do you think the author chose Advanced to use that attribute? Did it help to Camping (p.8) (Students who need more challenging make the text more engaging? What Coral Reefs (p.14) material) other attributes could you add to this passage to make it more engaging? 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Attributes_Teaching With eBooks
  10. 10. Attributes Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• What is the purpose of attributes in this text?• Does the use of attributes make this text more descriptive?• Does the use of attributes help to make the text more clear?• Does it assist with understanding?Now that we’ve looked at different attributes and seen examples of how the experts use them, let’s work in groups to findmore uses of attributes in texts. Let’s look through the eBooks and articles that we have access to in the classroom and findmore examples of attribute use. Using a sticky note, write a different way that you could use attributes in the places that youfound them. Now find a place where you could add a descriptive attribute to the writing. Write those on sticky notes.(If the attribute is found in an eBook write your answers on a piece of paper and identify the book and page it is found on. If it is in anarticle or physical book, use sticky notes.)Application: We are now going to practice writing our own descriptive attributes. The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (displays on whiteboard or LCD). Rookie Let’s read this passage together. Do you see any place where the author (Students who are new to the topic) used attributes? What other attributes could you use in this passage? Let’s write those together. The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (can either be displayed for whole group or on individual computers). Find a place in this eBook where the Apprentice author has used an attribute. Read the sentence that used an attribute. (Students who have some experience Why did the author choose that descriptive attribute? Choose another with the topic) section of the eBook where you could add an attribute. Write your sentence using a descriptive attribute. Skilled The teacher selects the eBook for students to use. Find at least 3 sentences in (Students who need more challenging the text that you could add a descriptive attribute to. Write your new material) sentences on a separate sheet of paper.Extension ActivityAt home tonight I want you to find a favorite book, newspaper, or magazine. Then find at least 3 times that the author usedattributes. Mark those pages or write the page numbers on a separate piece of paper. Now choose 3 more sections of yourreading material where you could add attributes to the writing. Rewrite those sentences on a separate piece of paper. © Rourke Educational Media
  11. 11. How to Teach: CAPTIONS GR A DE L EVEL 3- 8SummaryThis lesson will cover the purpose and use of captions in informational text. The student will be able to identify the purpose of captions intext and create their own captions for a text. Standards: Common Core Standards: RI.3.7; RI.4.5; RI.5.5; RI.6.5; RI.7.5; RI.8.5 Texas: 110.13; 110.14; 110.15; 110.18; 110.19; 110.20 Virginia: 3.6; 4.6; 5.5; 6.6; 7.6; 8.6 Materials: eBook models Content specific text and articles Sticky notes e-Book Models My Science Library 2-3 The Study of Money Let’s Explore Science • Earth is Tilting • American Coins and Bills • Animal Invaders • Where Did The Water Go? • Around the World with Money • Plants Out Of Place • Melting Matter American Symbols and Landmarks • Inventors and Discoveries • Gravity Do You Feel It? • The United States Capitol • Solar Energy • The White House Disovering the Arts • Early American Culture • Native American Culture LessonIntroduction: When an author is writing an informational Engage students in a discussion about the importance of captions.piece there are many techniques to support the reader in Have students list reasons why a caption is an important part of thelearning the material. One way is through the use of captions. text.When you read an informational text there are usually manyphotographs, diagrams, charts, etc. that the author intends Instruction/Models: Now, let’s look at some examples offor you to review. He/she often includes a caption to give you captions in texts that writers have used to convey importanta short description of what is happening in the photograph. information.Captions don’t always look exactly the same. Some captionsmay be in a box below the photograph, while others may be Show examples in texts of different captions. Read a few captions.included in the same box as the photograph. Have students decide why the author felt it necessary to have a caption for each picture. Rookie (Students who are new to Find a caption in this book. What information do you gain from reading this caption? the topic) Apprentice Why do you think the author chose to use that particular caption? Did you gain a better (Students who have some understanding of the topic after reading the caption? experience with the topic) Skilled Why do you think the author chose to use that particular caption? Did you gain a better (Students who need more understanding of the topic after reading the caption? What else could the author add to challenging material) this caption to assist in developing the reader’s understanding of the topic? 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Captions_Teaching With eBooks
  12. 12. Captions Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• Why did the author use a caption for this photograph?• Why did the author use a caption for this graph or diagram?• Was it important to read this caption?Now that we’ve looked at different captions and we’ve looked at examples of how the experts use them, let’s work ingroups to identify the purpose of captions that we find in the books and articles that we have in the classroom. Write youranswer on a sticky note.Application: We are now going to practice writing our own captions. The teacher selects the article/text for students to use and the caption to work with. Rookie Let’s read this caption together. What else could the author say about this (Students who are new to the topic) picture/diagram? Let’s write that together. The teacher selects the article/text for the students and the students select a caption from the text to work with. Read the caption that you have selected. Apprentice Why did the author write that caption? What could you add to the cap- (Students who have some experience tion to help the reader understand the photograph/diagram? Find another with the topic) photograph/diagram in the text and write your own caption about that photograph/diagram. The students will find the article/text that addresses the topic being covered. Use Skilled sticky notes to write captions for at least 3 photographs/diagrams in your (Students who need more challenging text. Now on a separate piece of paper write why you think this caption is material) essential to the comprehension of the text.Extension ActivityAt home tonight I want you to find a newspaper, magazine, or any other source of informational text and write newcaptions for at least 3 photographs, graphs, or diagrams that you find. Bring them to class and be prepared to discuss whyyou chose your caption. © Rourke Educational Media
  13. 13. How to Teach: CAUSE AND EFFECT GR A DE LEVEL K- 2SummaryThis lesson will teach students the relationship between cause and effect, how to recognize and analyze the uses of cause and effect ininformational texts, and allow students to use cause/effect in their own writing. Standards: Common Core Standards: W.K.3; W.K.7; W.K.8; W.1.2; W.1.8; W.2.2; W.2.3 Texas: 110.11A; 110.11B; 110.12A; 110.12B; 110.13B Virginia: K.9; K.10; 1.9; 1.13; 2.8; 2.9; 2.10; 2.12 Materials: eBook models Whiteboard or chalkboard Computer(s) with word processing program Markers, crayons, colored pencils Paper e-Book Models Little Birdie Leveled Readers K-1 Little Birdie Leveled Readers 2-3 • It’s Broken! • The King’s New Clothes Little Birdie Leveled Readers 1-2 My Science Library 1-2 • Jill and the Beanstalk • Plant Life Cycles • Ouch! Stitches Green Earth Science Discovery Library • Endangered!LessonIntroduction: Cause and effect shows us the relationship Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at some examples of causebetween two or more things. For example, if A does/causes and effect. Can you think of examples of cause and effect inthis, then this will happen/effect B. Informational texts your daily life? (Prompt a discussion by saying: If you don’t feedprovide many examples of cause and effect relationships. your dog, then what will be the effect?)Sometimes the cause and effect relationship is in the writtentext of the book and other times you’ll find it in a diagram Show examples from the texts of cause and effect relationships.or a chart. When you understand the relationship between Read a few examples to students. Have students decide why thecause and effect, you can make sense of how something relationship is important and what they have learned from it.works. In fiction, cause and effect change the action/plot inthe story. Rookie Find the cause in this book. Why is it the cause? What happens because of it throughout (Students who are new the book? to the topic) Apprentice (Students who have What is the cause in this book? Working with a partner, list all of the things that happened some experience with because of it. Be ready to share with the class. the topic) Skilled (Students who need Read the eBook. Explain how the cause and effect work together. Could there be any more challenging other outcomes? material) 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Cause and Effect_Teaching With eBooks
  14. 14. Cause and Effect Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• What is the purpose of cause and effect?• What types of language do writers use to signify cause and effect? (i.e. words like first, next, last…)• Do images or diagrams help you understand cause and effect?For nonfiction texts: Let’s look at a diagram. Can you tell me how this diagram works? Why are diagrams important ininformational texts?Now that we’ve looked at different cause and effect examples, let’s work in pairs to practice creating a storyboard thatshows the main cause and the effects in the story. You can use complete sentences to describe the events in order. You canalso illustrate the events. Rookie Let’s read the story together. Can you find the place where the effects happened? (Students who are new to the How do you know these are the effects? topic) Apprentice Read the eBook with a partner. Where do the effects happen? How did the cause (Students who have some start this process? experience with the topic) Skilled Read the eBook. Find the cause and list all of the effects. Can you think of other (Students who need more things that might also happen? challenging material)Extension ActivityNow, let’s practice rewriting the story with a new twist. Change the cause or the effects in the story. Type out your story andyou can illustrate your new story. Be sure to use words like: first, next, last. © Rourke Educational Media
  15. 15. How to Teach: CAUSE AND EFFECT GR A DE L EVEL 3- 8SummaryThis lesson will teach students the relationship between cause and effect, teach them to recognize and analyze the uses of cause and effectin informational texts, and allow students to apply cause/effect in their own writing. Standards: Common Core Standards: RI.3.3; RI.4.3; RI.4.5; RI.5.5; RI. 6.3; RI.7.3; RI.8.3 Texas: 110.14; 110.15; 110.16; 110.18; 110.19; 110.20 Virginia: 3.6; 4.6; 5.6; 6.6; 7.6; 8.6 Materials: eBook models Computer with word processing program e-Book Models Eye to Eye with Animals Eye to Eye with Endangered Habitats Let’s Explore Science • Saltwater Fish • Coral Reefs • Animal Invaders Life Cycles • Glaciers • Food Chains and Webs: The Struggle to • Squirrels • Rainforests Survive • Sunflowers Eye to Eye with Endangered Species • Understanding Biomes • Frogs and Toads • Giant Pandas • Restoring Wetlands My Science Library 2-3 • Whales • Environmental Disasters • What’s On the Food Chain Menu? • Floods, Dams, and Levees • What Do Critters Do in the Winter? • Forces and Motion at Work • Seeds, Bees, and Pollen • Plants Make Their Own Food • Where Did the Water Go? LessonIntroduction: Writers use cause and effect in their writing. Engage students in a discussion about what causes and effects areCause and effect shows us the relationship between two or and what are some of the things you can learn about your world.more things. For example, if A does/causes this, then this willhappen/effect B. Informational texts provide many examples Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at some examples of causeof cause and effect relationships. Sometimes the cause and and effect. Can you think of examples of cause and effect ineffect relationship is in the written text of the book and your daily life? (Teacher could prompt discussion with: If you don’tother times you’ll find it in a diagram or a chart. When you brush your teeth, then what will be the effect?)understand the relationship between cause and effect, youcan make sense of how something works. Show examples from the texts of cause and effect relationships. Read a few examples to students. Have students decide why the relationship is important and what they have learned from it. 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Cause and Effect_Teaching With eBooks
  16. 16. Cause and Effect Lesson - Continued Find a cause in this passage. Why is this a Rookie cause? What word gives you a clue that this Where Did the Water Go? (pgs. 8-9) (Students who are new is a cause? Find the effect in this passage? Plants Make Their Own Food (pgs. 10-11) to the topic) Why is it the effect? What word gives you a clue that this is the effect? Apprentice What’s on the Food Chain Menu? (pgs. 16-17) (Students who have Find a cause and effect relationship. How do they work together? Saltwater Fish (pg. 18-19) some experience with the topic) Skilled (Students who need Read the passage. Explain how the cause Environmental Disasters (pgs. 12-15) and effect work together. Can you have Built to Last (pgs. 18-19) more challenging another possible outcome? material)Additional Discussion Prompts:• What is the purpose of cause and effect?• What types of language do writers use to signify cause and effect? (i.e. words like first, next, last…)• Do images or diagrams help you understand cause and effect?• Let’s look at a diagram. Can you tell me how this diagram works? Why are diagrams important in informational texts?Now that we’ve looked at different cause and effect examples, let’s work in pairs to practice creating our own cause andeffect diagrams. Let’s look through the eBooks and find more examples of cause and effect. Then, with your partner, drawyour own cause and effect diagram that explains the scientific process you selected (i.e. photosynthesis, food chain/web,water cycle, ozone depletion, pollution).Application: We are now going to practice writing our own cause and effect narrative. The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (displays on whiteboard, LCD, or eReader). Rookie Let’s read this passage together. Do you see the place where the author has (Students who are new to the included a cause and effect example? Read the cause and the effect. What is the topic) cause? What is the effect? The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (can either be displayed for whole group or Apprentice on individual computers). Find a place in this eBook where the author has included a (Students who have some cause and effect diagram. Why did the author choose to include a cause and effect experience with the topic) diagram? Choose another section of the eBook where you could convert the information in the paragraph into a cause and effect diagram. The teacher selects the eBook for students to use. Find at least 2 written examples of Skilled cause and effect. Build an original cause and effect diagram using the (Students who need more information you found in the text. Next, in a paragraph below your diagram, write challenging material) out in sequential order what happens in the cause and effect relationship. Tell us if there might be any other outcomes in this process.Extension ActivityAt home tonight, I would like you to build off the topics we covered in class today. Imagine another cause and effectrelationship; one that would have multiple causes and multiple effects. Draw a diagram to illustrate the cause and effectrelationships. Then write a paragraph using sequential words (first, next, last, finally…) to explain the topic and all of thelogical outcomes of this relationship. © Rourke Educational Media
  17. 17. How to Teach: COMPARISONS GR A DE L EVEL 3- 8 Summary This lesson will cover how to use comparisons in your writing in order to provide better descriptions. Comparisons are used in narrative texts as well as informative/explanatory texts. Comparisons can include the use of similes, the suffixes –er and –est, and words such as too, or also. The student will be able to identify when comparisons are used in writing and be able use comparisons in their own writing. Standards: Common Core Standards: W.3.2; W.4.2; W.5.2; W.6.2; W.7.2; W.8.2 Texas: 110.14; 110.15; 110.16 Virginia: 3.9; 4.7; 5.7; 6.7; 7.7; 8.7 Materials: eBook models Content specific text and articles Sticky notese-Book Models Little Birdie Readers 2-3 Eye to Eye with Animals • Little Red Riding Hood • Frogs • Disaster Day • Hippos and Rhinos • Sharks Eye to Eye with Cats Eye to Eye with Big Cats • Exotic Cats • Cheetahs Eye to Eye with Endangered Species • Steller Sea Lions LessonIntroduction: Great writers use comparisons in their writing. Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at some examples ofUsing comparisons in writing helps the reader get a better authors who used comparisons in their writing.picture in their head and gain a better understanding of whatis written. Show examples of comparisons used in texts. Read a few examples to students. Have students discuss how the author used comparisonsMake an anchor chart titled Making Comparisons. Show examples in their writing.of all the ways comparisons can be made, using similes, adding –erand –est to words, and using the words also and too. For example,Simile: A hippo secretes a red, oily fluid on its body that looks like itis sweating blood. Rookie Read the Fun Fact on page 14. Why is the author (Students who are new to the comparing the oily fluid to sweating blood? How Hippos and Rhinos topic) does this help the reader? Apprentice Read the paragraph on page 19. Where does the (Students who have some author use a comparison? How does this Hippos and Rhinos experience with the topic) comparison help the reader? Read page 11 in the book Frogs. Where does the Skilled author use comparisons? What kinds of Frogs (Students who need more comparisons are being made? Read page 5 in the Cheetahs challenging material) book Cheetahs. Does the author use any comparisons on this page? 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Comparisons Lesson__Teaching With eBooks
  18. 18. Comparisons Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• How does using a comparison help a reader?• What are some ways that you can compare things?Now that we’ve looked at examples of how the experts use comparisons, let’s work in pairs to find more comparisonsin texts. Let’s look through the eBooks and articles that we have access to in the classroom and find more examples ofcomparisons in writing. Then, find a place where you could add a comparison to a piece of writing. Use sticky notes, yourwriter’s notebook, or a piece of paper to record your writing.Application: We are now going to practice writing comparisons on our own. (Use the eBook Steller Sea Lions.) The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (displays on whiteboard or LCD). Rookie Let’s read this passage together. Do you see any place where the author (Students who are new to the topic) used comparisons? Could you add a comparison anywhere in this passage? Let’s write that together. The teacher selects a specific page of the eBook for students to use (can either be Apprentice displayed for whole group or on individual computers). Let’s read this passage (Students who have some experience together. Can you find a place where the author used comparisons? Could with the topic) you add a comparison anywhere in this passage? Write a new comparison with a partner. Share with the class. Skilled The teacher selects the eBook for students to use. Read the book then find (Students who need more challenging three parts where you can add comparisons and rewrite those parts of the material) book.Extension ActivityIn your independent reading book, find at least 3 examples where the author makes comparisons. Mark those pages with asticky note. Now find a section of your reading material where you could add more comparisons to the writing. Mark thatpage with a sticky note and rewrite those sentences on a separate piece of paper. © Rourke Educational Media
  19. 19. How to Teach: CONTRASTING GR A DE L EVEL 3- 8 Summary This lesson will cover how to contrast two things or ideas in writing. The student will be able to identify when they see contrasts in texts and how to create their own examples of contrast in their own writing. Standards: Common Core Standards: W.3.2; W.4.2; W.5.2; W.6.2; W.7.2; W.8.2 Texas: 110.14; 110.15; 110.16; 110.18; 110.19; 110.20 Virginia: 3.6; 4.6; 5.5; 5.6; 6.6; 7.6; 8.6 Materials: eBook models Content specific text and articles Sticky notese-Book Models Eye to Eye with Animals Eye to Eye with Animals • Insects • Frogs My Science Library 3-4 • Hippos and Rhinos • Skeletons and Exoskeletons The Study of Money • Mix It Up • Around the World With Money My Science Library, 4-5 • Fossils and Rocks LessonIntroduction: Great writers contrast ideas or things in their Tell the students that these are some words they may see in textswriting. When you contrast something, you are showing the that show the author is trying to contrast two things. Show studentsdifferences. You may be writing about how peoples’ opinions examples of this in texts. These are also words that they can use inare different, or how two animals are different, or even their writing to signal contrast as well.how two events turned out differently. Sometimes writersuse keywords to signal the reader when they are showing a Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at some examples of signaldifference between two ideas or concepts. words and contrasting in eBooks. Show examples of contrast in texts. Read a few examples toMake an anchor chart titled, “Words That Signal Contrast.” Write students. Have students discuss how the author used contrast in his/the words but, yet, still, otherwise or, though, another, and rather. her writing. Rookie Read page 12 and 13. What is the author (Students who are new to the contrasting here? Does the author use signal Frogs and Toads topic) words? Where? Look at pages 14 and 15. What is the author Apprentice contrasting here? Write some sentences with (Students who have some Frogs and Toads signal words that tell about the differences in experience with the topic) frogs and toads’ bodies. Read Chapter 1 of the book and look for contrasts Skilled between a rhino and a hippo. Has the author (Students who need more used any signal words? Write a sentence using Hippos and Rhinos challenging material) the information from these two pages on how the hippos and rhinos are different. Use signal words. 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Contrasting_Teaching With eBooks
  20. 20. Contrasting Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• What is the purpose for using contrast in this text?• What exactly is contrasted in this text?• What were some of the differences listed in the text?Now that we’ve looked at examples of how the experts show contrast in texts, let’s work in pairs to find more examples of thisin texts. Let’s look through the eBooks and articles that we have access to in the classroom and find more examples of signalwords and contrasting information in writing. Then, find a place where you could add signal words. Use sticky notes, yourwriter’s notebook, or a piece of paper to record your writing.Application: We are now going to practice showing contrast in our own writing. (Use eBook Eye to Eye with Animals: Insects.) The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (displays on whiteboard or LCD). Rookie Let’s read this passage together. Do you see any place where the author (Students who are new to the topic) showed contrast? Were any signal words used? Let’s list them together. List the words on the anchor chart. Apprentice The teacher selects a specific page of the eBook for students to use (can either be (Students who have some displayed for whole group or on individual computers). Work with a experience with the topic) partner to find and list the places of contrast and the signal words. Skilled The teacher selects the eBook for students to use. Read the book (Students who need more independently. Then, find and list the places of contrast and the signal challenging material) words.Extension ActivityIn your independent reading book, find at least 3 examples where the author uses contrast and signal words. Mark thosepages with a sticky note. Now, using words like you found in the book, draft your own sentences (or paragraphs) using signalwords that show contrast. You can illustrate it, too! © Rourke Educational Media
  21. 21. How to Teach: DEFINITION FORM GR A DE L EVEL 3- 8SummaryThis lesson will cover what definition forms are and how to utilize them in writing and research. The student will be able to identifydictionary forms, use them in decoding texts, and create their own definitions in writing. Standards: Common Core Standards: RF.3.3; RF.4.3; RF.5.3; L.3.4; L.4.4; L.5.4 Texas: 110.14; 110.15; 110.16 Virginia: 3.4; 4.4; 5.4 Materials: eBook models Dictionary Sticky notese-Book Models Eye to Eye with Animals Eye to Eye with Endangered Habitats • Freshwater Fish • Coral Reefs • Snakes • Oceans Eye to Eye with Endangered Species • Spiders • Manatees • Saltwater Fish • Sea Turtles My Science Library 2-3 • Steller Sea Lions • What’s On the Food Chain Menu? • Whales • Let’s Classify Animals! Let’s Explore Science • Animal Invaders • Food Chains and Webs: The Struggle to Survive • Understanding Biomes • Restoring Wetlands LessonIntroduction: Writers use complex words and definitions in Engage students in a discussion about what dictionaries andtheir writing. Definitions for words come from dictionaries. glossaries have in common and how both are helpful when we readDictionaries are valuable research tools that provide us with and write.pronunciation guides, synonyms, and explanations. Oneexample of dictionary forms are glossaries found in the backs Instruction/Models: Now let’s look at some examples ofof nonfiction books. Glossaries provide us with information dictionary and glossary entries.about words we are unfamiliar with so that we can betterunderstand the topic. Show examples from the texts of glossary entries. Read a few examples to students. Have students decide why the author included each term in the glossary. Rookie Find a bold word in this book. Why is this word in bold? Saltwater Fish (Students who are new to Read the word out loud. What do you think this word (cartilage, p. 10) the topic) means? Why do you think that? Freshwater Fish (gills, p. 7) Apprentice Find a word in bold in the book. Then look up the bold Saltwater Fish (policy, p. (Students who have some word in the glossary in the back of the book. Read the 20), Freshwater Fish experience with the topic) glossary definition. Did this help you understand the text? (interconnected, p. 10) Find a glossary word from the book. Did this glossary entry Skilled help you understand the topic better? What other words Understanding Biomes (Students who need more are synonyms for the glossary word? Brainstorm or use a (aquatic, p. 6) challenging material) dictionary or thesaurus to help you. 1-800-380-2289 • www.rourkeeducationalmedia.com © 2013 May be reproduced for classroom use. Definition Form Lesson_Teaching with eBooks
  22. 22. Definition Form Lesson - ContinuedAdditional Discussion Prompts:• What is the purpose of a dictionary or glossary?• Does the use of a dictionary or glossary help you when you read?• Let’s look at the pronunciation guides. Can you tell me how those guides work? Why are pronunciation guides important?Now that we’ve looked at different glossary examples, let’s work in pairs to practice using glossaries. Let’s look through theeBooks and find more examples of words and their glossary entries. Using a sticky note, write the bolded word’s definition. Thenthink of and write a different word you could use to replace the bolded glossary word in the body of the text. Make sure youchoose a synonym, a word that means the same thing, so you don’t change the meaning of the sentence.Application: We are now going to practice writing our own paragraphs using the dictionary form and style. The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (displays on whiteboard, LCD, or eReader). Let’s read this passage together. Do you see the place where the Rookie author bolded a word to let us know it is important and that it is in the (Students who are new to the topic) glossary? Read the glossary definition of the word. Let’s think of a synonym for this word. The teacher selects the eBook for students to use (can either be displayed for whole group or on individual computers). Find a place in this eBook where the Apprentice author has included a bold word. Why did the author choose that word as (Students who have some a glossary word? Choose another section of the eBook where you could experience with the topic) use this glossary word without changing the meaning of the paragraph. Write the new sentence. Skilled The teacher selects the eBook for students to use. Find at least 3 bold words in (Students who need more the eBook. Read their glossary definitions. Write synonyms for the 3 challenging material) glossary words. Then write new sentences using the synonyms.Extension ActivityAt home tonight, I would like you to write your own paragraph on your favorite aquatic animal. Pick three tricky words thatreaders might need help with. Then, bold those three words in your paragraph. Below your paragraph, create a glossary.Place your three words in ABC order, create a pronunciation guide for each word and a clear definition for each word. Youshould use a dictionary to help you with your pronunciation guide and definition. © Rourke Educational Media

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