INFLUENCE BROADBAND
EXPANSION?
STATE WACEC CONVENTION,
EAU CLAIRE, WI
JUNE, 2014
Professor Andy Lewis,
Broadband & Economi...
Definition of broadband (adj)
Bing Dictionary
broad·band
[ bráwd bànd ]
1. covering many frequencies: using a wide range o...
3
What is Broadband?
 Federal Communication Commission (FCC)
definition (for residential service):
 Current: 4 Mbps Down...
Speed Matters….
Dial-up+ (56 Kbps):
 1 day, 10 hrs, 44 min
T1/DSL (1.54 Mbps):
 1 Hour, 15 min
Cable (10 Mbps ):
 11 mi...
Data Speed Capacity
Broadband Technologies
5
Getting on the Same Page
“Ya got to have em
both…”
Wired
and
Wireless
6
A Look Back…
177618861976
Source: National Geographic, Artwork
by William Bond and Leo Zebarth,
compiled by Dorothy Nichol...
Evolution of the Internet
December196
9
July 1977
Source: http://www.fibel.org/linux/lfo-0.6.0/arpanet.png
8
Shortly after the bi-centennial…
9
State Networks
10
State-wide Network Example
11
• National Broadband Goals
• Innovation—Change Happens!
“There's a way to do it better—find it” Thomas Edison
Growing Broa...
National Broadband Goals
Goal No. 1: At least 100 million U.S. homes should have affordable access to actual download
spee...
Innovation:
Demand is Growing Faster Than Infrastructure….Why?
 Video Conferencing
(Skype/Google Hangout)
 Tele-Health (...
Public Service Commission Tools
• Playbook for Broadband
• LinkWISCONSIN Mapping Efforts and Wisconsin Dashboard
• Cost Mo...
Wisconsin’s Playbook for
Broadband
http://www.link.wisconsin.gov/lwi/docs/WI_Playbook.p
df
16
Public Service Commission
Mapping/Assessment Tools
 LinkWISCONSIN Mapping Efforts
 Tied to the National Broadband Maps
...
Wisconsin Dashboard
http://wisconsindashboard.org/
18
Cost Model: The Cost
Cost Model: The Economic Impact
PSC’s Mapping & Demand
Efforts21
Wired Technology Dec ‘11- June ‘13
Broadband Demand (Residential)
22
Broadband Access: CAI’s
23
Community Anchor Institutions
• Bi-annual broadband
information collection
• Over 4,000 CAI’s
• Collect data on: CAI
categ...
Community Anchor InstitutionsCAICategory
CAICount
Validated
CAI's%
ofCIA'sValidated
Schools k-12 2311 1127 49%
Libraries 5...
Bandwidth Assessment Tool
(BAT)
Broadband Assessment Tool
(BAT)27
The BAT Survey
Areas of Assessment
• Current service – location, current speed, type of service, etc.
• User profile – con...
BAT Survey: Group Option
29
BAT Assessment Results
30
Fixed Residential Broadband
Prices (Average in the U.S.)
Average Monthly
Price
$(2011 PPP*)
Rank Among OECD and
other Coun...
Dunn County Example
http://wisconsindashboard.org/console/infograph
Cost Analysis
http://www.verizonwireless.com/wcms/consumer/shop/shop-data-
plans/more-everything.html
Verizon Wireless exa...
Cost Matters
The current BadgerNet rate for a 1 Gbps WAN
circuit ($11,652 per month) in Wisconsin is
nearly ten times the ...
Fixed Contract Price vs. Competitive
Bids?
Source: Educational Superhighway, Connecting America’s Students:
Opportunities ...
Build a CAN/Build
Subscribership36
PSC’s Mobile Pulse Data
Light Grey: DNR
Pink: PSC
Green: UW-Extension
Blue: Local Government
Yellow: EDCs
Purple: DATCP
Br...
Strategies to Enhance
Broadband
See: http://broadband.uwex.edu/resources/regulations/
38
Regulations and Policies
 Develop a plan (more on the Comprehensive
Plan…)
 Adopt a resolution that states the broadband...
“Smart Growth” Comprehensive
Plans
See draft Comprehensive plan update for the Village of Weston:
http://broadband.uwex.ed...
Know Your Business Community
…all of them…. http://youreconomy.org/
Education: Broadband Fairs…
42
Education & Outreach…
 Build better understanding
for the need for broadband
 Increase digital literacy
 Increase broad...
Know Available Funding
Streams
 Broadband Expansion Grant Program
http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/ERF_public/Default.aspx
 Farm...
 Host a Broadband Listening Sessions
 Attend a Broadband Boot Camp with a UWEX
Educator (CNRED, Family Living, 4H, Ag)
...
QUESTIONS?
Professor Andy Lewis,
Broadband & Economic Development Specialist
Broadband & E-Commerce Education Center
Andy....
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WI Association of County Extension Committees (WACEC) 2014

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What are county options for broadband in Wisconsin? Presentation by the University Wisconsin Extension Broadband & E-Commerce Education Center June 2014

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  • Broadband vs Narrowband
    1) In communications, band is referred to as the range of frequencies (bandwidth) used in the channel. Depending on the size of the band (in terms of kHz, MHz or GHz), and some other properties of the communication channel, they can be categorized as narrowband (dial-up), broadband and wideband etc. In data communication, bandwidth is measured in terms of bit rate (kbps, Mbps etc).
  • FCC Definition:
    Proposed change for this year could be as high as 25 Mbps download

    This last definition is the one that I have been using for more than ten years. It best describes what is needed and our needs are rapidly changing. We will come back to a brief discussion of the demand survey and broadband assessment tool that helps us determine what is needed.
  • So why does speed matter?

    Two things to know: The Data Pipe or technology measures the speed or “bandwidth” in megabits per second. As you can see in this example with wired technologies, the larger the pipe/faster the speed, the quicker a file will download to your computer/device. File sizes (measured in Megabytes) vary pending the work you do--visiting (or downloading) a webpage is a relatively small file size; viewing or streaming a video which is a larger file size requires more bandwidth or a bigger pipe—in this example you can clearly see fiber is a bigger pipe and will download a 835 MB file in seconds versus days with a dial-up connection.

    So why does this matter? As the internet and innovations evolved, so do the bandwidth needs and demand—streaming videos and large data files is commonplace for education, telemedicine, etc.


  • So what about speeds: Different technologies allow for different speeds and, talk about change. Technology and these speed capacities are a moving target and thus, even the conceptual view is somewhat outdated.

    Fiber is now delivering 100 Gbps. Conceptual limits of wireless are also over-stated. There have been experiments using wireless that have delivered 1 gbps for very short distances (across a room) from one point to another. In other words the green area is a bit more of a stretch for the LTE than it is for the fiber.  (not sure about this per the recent Craig Settles audio)
  • Defy the myth: Wireless does not stand alone—it can’t take over the world and be the only solution; in other words, you can’t have wireless without a wired connection. Ya need em both!

    So, How Did We get and how do we evolve so all communities are connected?
  • Andy

    1776: Foot power, horse power, sail and paddle power carried the nation in its infancy: Earliest horseback routes and post roads (heavier red lines) extended eventually from Falmouth, Maine, to St. Augustine, Florida while Spanish mission trails (dashed)opened the southwest. Fur traders’ canoes were followed by flatboats and river packets on waterways from Canada to New Orleans

    1876: By the centennial year, eastern rails and western trails had stitched together vast distances. Gleaming rails (gray lines) linked the Atlantic and Pacific when the golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, on May 10, 1869. Earlier, the pony express had carried the mails, and pioneers had followed covered-wagon trails west (dashed red lines). Cattle trails (dotted) took Texas herds to railheads in Kansas and Colorado.

    1976: The age of speed shrunk coast-to-coast travel time to four or five days on the interstate system (red), or as many hours by commercial jet. In covered-wagon days, six months was needed for the cross-country trek. Railroads reduced that to about three days. Air lanes on this map show only a fraction of the thousands of U.S. routes between cites large and small.

    Transportation routes were built to connect our communities to markets. The same is true of telecommunications infrastructure. For Rural states that lack access to major metropolitan markets, this infrastructure is critical. Its amazing to me to think about this 200 year history and then realize that most of the Internet infrastructure has been built after this country’s bicentennial.
  • Now, these images aren’t that clear, but you see how the ARPANET evolved from 1972-1999; and it continues….the same thing that happened with transportation infrastructure is happening with broadband infrastructure, but it is happening at a much faster pace
  • Today, we still have the R & D Networks like Internet2, that connect our universities, government agencies, regional and state education agencies, etc. world-wide.

    Internet2 comprises*:
    252 U.S. universities (Including the University of Wisconsin
    82 leading corporations
    68 affiliate members, including government agencies
    41 regional and state education networks (i.e. WiscNet, Merit, OarNet)
    More than 65 national research and education networking partners representing over 100 countries


  • We also have private provider networks—ATT, Verizon, CenturyLink, WIN…. But just like the transportation system, these roads interconnect, some dependent on shared infrastructure and collaborations; some are “local county roads and others super internet highways”…in simpler terms…
  • We can talk about network maps, but a simpler way to visual networks within a state is illustrated. Despite whose network most are comprised of what is referred to as the Backbone, Middle-mile, and last mile. The last mile connects to homes and businesses, middle mile to anchor institutions, and the backbone, well to the national/global entity as depicted on previous maps.

    Strategies that can influence getting broadband may differ for the middle mile and last mile; however, if anchor institutions get robust broadband connectivity opportunities can open for last mile providers.

    These basic concepts can help us think about what can be done to influence better broadband moving forward
  • Bottom line…..yes, national goals help to drive change, but the greater force is all the innovators and change agents that create and find new and different ways of doing work; broadband is an enabler and those engaged in the technology also find different, and often better ways to do things...
  • Briefly identify these goals and then relate them to the statewide network example

    Many rural areas were upset with the “goal” of getting 100 million households big broadband (100 Mbps), knowing that this goal excluded more than 15 million households, most of which would likely be rural. Obviously by 2020 there will be more than 115 million households.
  • We are doing our work differently….the landscape is changing for every institution and entity in our nation and globally…change is inevitable!
  • Partnering with PSC
  • Utilize the action steps that can improve broadband availability and utilization throughout Wisconsin!

    Become involved in your region—the playbook identifies the local regions and contact information for each. PSC can get you connected!
  • Results of Demand Survey Data

    Mention Cost model and how stakeholders can use this data (Andy)
    Access InfoGraph,
  • Andy
  • Andy
    $1.4 billion for wired option / $290 million per year = Less than a 5 year payback

    It’s important to note that this input output analysis really calculates the impact of the construction investment. The much larger impact, which is difficult to measure for an enabling technology like broadband, is the impact that this has on businesses, and public institutions saving money.

  • Identify change in connectivity, wired, wireless, fixed wireless
  • Demand survey results; dashboard will be changing and all PSC information accessible from the LW webpage
  • CAI’s play an integral roll in the community by contributing to economic development, education, health care, and public safety needs. Through our survey we can identify broadband deficits throughout the community that can then be used by state planners to initiate broadband build out in key underserved areas.

    Matt Noone, Broadband Mapping Architect
    Public Service Commission of WI
    Matthew.Noone@wisconsin.gov  

  • Surveys are sent out twice a year to CAI. Combination of phone calls, and emails to establish contact with the various organizations for validation.

    Currently WI survey’s over 4,000 CAI’s from which we collect data on their provider, delivery technology utilized and Upload/download speeds. For our round 9 surveys we will be adding new questions to our existing survey that will provide the PSC with additional information regarding hurdles that CAI’s face in obtaining their bandwidth needs.
  • The prior 8 data collection rounds have been focusing on validation of primarily schools and libraries. For round 9 data collection we will remain with out focus on schools and libraries, but we will also extend our outreach efforts to the Public Safety and Health Care sectors whose bandwidth reliance and needs are always increasing.

    Of the over 4,000 CAI’s, we have validated 43% of those institutions broadband availabilities. Just under half of the schools have been validate, while over 80% of libraries have been validated.
  • Model impact of broadband investments
    Valuable to decision making on initiatives that incent deployment (i.e. PSC Grant funding)
    Calculates impact of network investments
    Considers three basic impacts:
    Direct impact of construction & operation
    Economic development impact
    Broader community
  • Determines broadband bandwidth needs for business and residents
  • Bandwidth Assessment Tool:
    Getting data for bandwidth needs
    Will roll into dashboard information but via a new more robust tool
    Create a “Group” for your community

    An illustrated process
    Understand the tool and be prepared to support it’s use
    Organize and provide access to and promote the tool
    Monitor use and follow up accordingly
    Engage with / promote tool with providers



  • Conservative use with 4 people vacationing—does not include data for working from this location which would most likely require additional bandwidth

    Assessed Bandwidth Needs
    Download/Upload Usage
    Application Usage
    List of Providers offering the speeds
  • Andy

    We can talk about access and adoption, but affordability MUST be part of the equation. Average monthly price in 2011 documented within the National Broadband Goals shows…

    PPP = Purchasing power parity is a currency conversion rate that converts to a common currency and equalizes the purchasing power of different currencies

    Ranked from lowest to highest (#1 would be the lowest price)

    With respect to mobile broadband, the FCC concluded that “particularly for smartphone plans, the
    United States is one of the ten least expensive countries in terms of price per gigabyte of data.”

    Two things to keep in mind…..

    Broadband is unregulated so providers chose what they can/will charge and how they do so (i.e. triple play and/or individual options for internet, TV, phone); different technologies also bring about different price offerings..
  • Andy
    We showed you that $69.75 was about the average price that U.S. residents were paying for broadband. If we were going to look at “affordability” we need to consider that a county like Dunn, has a median household income that is about 10% lower than the national average ($47,847 vs. $53,406 (90.2%). In theory, Dunn County resident could likely only afford 90% of the national average or about $50.96 per month. Based on the consumer broadband survey results we can see that about 59% of the respondents are paying more than that. About 40% are paying more than $60 (the national average, not adjusted for lower incomes).
  • Many of our rural residents do not have access to a wired broadband option that is likely to offer a service without data caps….

    For example, wireless providers now cell service by data packages—”Data Caps” are a new pricing structure within the past few years, and wireless providers are not alone in offering this type of pricing model….but, is it affordable?

    Usage has increased eightfold in the last 5 years is predicted to increase threefold again by 2016

    A couple things to note: Data Caps keep changing as they are somewhat of a new way of charging for broadband.

    Understanding affordability, access, and adoption are strageties other communities are using are
  • Andy

    The average costs for all districts for 1 Gbps lit fiber was $1,272 per month (incumbent telephone and cable service providers, charge on average, twice as much per circuit as other providers such as competitive local exchange carriers, high-speed data network providers, public agencies and other competitive entrants— $1,566 per month vs. $822 per month .
  • Andy
  • Two resources available through the Broadband & E-Commerce Center address strategies other Wisconsin Communities have done to overcome barriers to broadband access and affordability.
  • Robust data regarding access and demand is a strategy our state is using to expand broadband. PSC’s Mobile

    Crowd Sourcing Data App Crowd Sourcing Data: PSC

    PSC will use the mobile Broadband testing data to improve the accuracy of our Broadband coverage maps.  This should help people across the state further identify places that need Broadband improvements.  They also want to use the data as a guide for expansion funding possibilities. (PSC grants)  The success of either of these objectives rides on the need to gather a very robust data set of mobile Broadband tests through our apps and other tools.
  • Andy: Know what others are doing….policies, ordinances,
  • Andy:

    Wisconsin State Statute 66.0422: The definition for "Local government" in this statute is defined to mean a city, village, or town. No mention of Counties. There must have been an assumption that Counties had not been granted the authority to provide broadband services and yet:
    When I look at 59.57, there appears to be authority that could be interpreted very broadly to include broadband. Pun intended. For example, in the description of a County Industrial Development Agency, it says, “do all things necessary to provide for the continued improvement of the industrial climate of the county”. An industrial development project is defined as meaning: ”any site, structure, facility, or undertaking comprising or being connected with or being a part of an industrial, manufacturing, commercial, retail, agribusiness, or service−related enterprise established or to be established by an industrial development agency”. I would think that this would clearly authorize the County to build fiber infrastructure for example, within an industrial park owned by the County?
  • Andy:

    It is important to note that in 1999, Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning Law (§66.1001 Wisconsin
    Statutes) required that every municipality in the state that wished to have a say in land use decisions
    approve and adopt a comprehensive plan prior to January 1, 2010. That law also requires an update to
    the plan every ten years at a minimum. In particular, the elements of the plan that address Utilities
    and Community Facilities and Economic Development could be updated to include more specific
    recommendations for broadband expansion.
  • New tool from DEED, in collaboration with Institution for Exceptional Growth Companies,

    Your Economy (YE) analyzes economic activity at the community level - and across the country. YE sets itself apart from other data sources in a number of ways, beginning with establishment-level data and inclusion of more small businesses and all industries. Breaking this data down into different key indicators and employment stages. helps to identify business growth/decline during specific timeframe (5, 10, years). This is just a 10 year snip from one county, but notice the Self and Stage 1 companies—these, in addition to larger entities are those that can grow our economy with broadband. Just a glance at this powerful tool—you can dig into both growth and delcline with the various YE indicators and the details and rankings for each.
  • Andy:

    Understand Community Needs (Listening Sessions) and Educate communities on opportunities/gaps/stragegies
  • All business sectors and all ages need to have an understanding and adoption of these tools and resources…jobs, healthcare, education, etc. and it is our job to educate how and why…..
  • Your Resource for Broadband connectivity and education…
  • WI Association of County Extension Committees (WACEC) 2014

    1. 1. INFLUENCE BROADBAND EXPANSION? STATE WACEC CONVENTION, EAU CLAIRE, WI JUNE, 2014 Professor Andy Lewis, Broadband & Economic Development Specialist Broadband & E-Commerce Education Center Jill Hietpas, Regional Broadband Educator Broadband & E-Commerce Education Center
    2. 2. Definition of broadband (adj) Bing Dictionary broad·band [ bráwd bànd ] 1. covering many frequencies: using a wide range of electromagnetic frequencies 2. transferring data fast: able to transfer large amounts of data at high speed Broadband
    3. 3. 3 What is Broadband?  Federal Communication Commission (FCC) definition (for residential service):  Current: 4 Mbps Down/1 Mbps Up  Proposed: ~10 Mbps/3 Mbps (maybe greater)  Alternative definition:  Connection that does not limit application (i.e. VoIP, web-based video streaming, future innovations?)
    4. 4. Speed Matters…. Dial-up+ (56 Kbps):  1 day, 10 hrs, 44 min T1/DSL (1.54 Mbps):  1 Hour, 15 min Cable (10 Mbps ):  11 min, 44 sec Fiber (1 Gbps):  7 sec Technology (Data Pipe) Files/Data (Megabytes) 4
    5. 5. Data Speed Capacity Broadband Technologies 5
    6. 6. Getting on the Same Page “Ya got to have em both…” Wired and Wireless 6
    7. 7. A Look Back… 177618861976 Source: National Geographic, Artwork by William Bond and Leo Zebarth, compiled by Dorothy Nicholson, National Geographic Art Division. 7
    8. 8. Evolution of the Internet December196 9 July 1977 Source: http://www.fibel.org/linux/lfo-0.6.0/arpanet.png 8
    9. 9. Shortly after the bi-centennial… 9
    10. 10. State Networks 10
    11. 11. State-wide Network Example 11
    12. 12. • National Broadband Goals • Innovation—Change Happens! “There's a way to do it better—find it” Thomas Edison Growing Broadband Demand:
    13. 13. National Broadband Goals Goal No. 1: At least 100 million U.S. homes should have affordable access to actual download speeds of at least 100 megabits per second and actual upload speeds of at least 50 megabits per second (2020). As a milestone, 100 million U.S. homes should have affordable access to 50 Mbps/20 Mbps by 2015 Goal No. 2: The United States should lead the world in mobile innovation, with the fastest and most extensive wireless networks of any nation. Goal No. 3: Every American should have affordable access to robust broadband service, and the means and skills to subscribe if they so choose. Goal No. 4: Every American community should have affordable access to at least 1 gigabit per second broadband service to anchor institutions such as schools, hospitals and government buildings (2018). Goal No. 5: To ensure the safety of the American people, every first responder should have access to a nationwide, wireless, interoperable broadband public safety network. Goal No. 6: To ensure that America leads in the clean energy economy, every American should be able to use broadband to track and manage their real-time energy consumption. FCC National Broadband Plan: http://www.broadband.gov/plan 13
    14. 14. Innovation: Demand is Growing Faster Than Infrastructure….Why?  Video Conferencing (Skype/Google Hangout)  Tele-Health (Human/Plant Genome example)  Entertainment (NetFlix, Gaming)  Distance Learning/Flipped Classrooms  Public Safety/Government Services  Business and E-Commerce 14
    15. 15. Public Service Commission Tools • Playbook for Broadband • LinkWISCONSIN Mapping Efforts and Wisconsin Dashboard • Cost Model • Broadband Assessment Tool (BAT) • Mobile Pulse Regulations and Policies “Smart Growth” Comprehensive Plans Business Growth/Decline Education and Outreach Strategies for Local Elected Officials
    16. 16. Wisconsin’s Playbook for Broadband http://www.link.wisconsin.gov/lwi/docs/WI_Playbook.p df 16
    17. 17. Public Service Commission Mapping/Assessment Tools  LinkWISCONSIN Mapping Efforts  Tied to the National Broadband Maps  Quickly identify Internet Service Providers (ISPs) who serve specific address geographical locations  Based on Census Block Data and Updated bi- annually 17
    18. 18. Wisconsin Dashboard http://wisconsindashboard.org/ 18
    19. 19. Cost Model: The Cost
    20. 20. Cost Model: The Economic Impact
    21. 21. PSC’s Mapping & Demand Efforts21 Wired Technology Dec ‘11- June ‘13
    22. 22. Broadband Demand (Residential) 22
    23. 23. Broadband Access: CAI’s 23
    24. 24. Community Anchor Institutions • Bi-annual broadband information collection • Over 4,000 CAI’s • Collect data on: CAI category type, BB Provider, Delivery Technology and Download/Upload Speeds Source: PSC Demand Survey Webinar, February 24
    25. 25. Community Anchor InstitutionsCAICategory CAICount Validated CAI's% ofCIA'sValidated Schools k-12 2311 1127 49% Libraries 504 416 83% Health Care (Hospitals) 139 34 24% Public Safety 897 151 17% Higher Education 134 16 12% Government- municipalities 80 26 33% Non-Government 113 13 12% Grand Total 4178 1783 43% 25
    26. 26. Bandwidth Assessment Tool (BAT)
    27. 27. Broadband Assessment Tool (BAT)27
    28. 28. The BAT Survey Areas of Assessment • Current service – location, current speed, type of service, etc. • User profile – concurrent users, PCs/tablets, avg. hours use per user, VOIP, etc. • Video – streaming time, minutes down/up loading, avg. video use per user, etc. • Social Media – concurrent users, time on media per user per day, etc. • Audio – streaming time, minutes down/up loading, avg audio use per user, etc. • Online apps and gaming – concurrent users, avg online app hours per user, etc. • Basic web – concurrent users, number sites per user per day, email/attm qty, etc. 28
    29. 29. BAT Survey: Group Option 29
    30. 30. BAT Assessment Results 30
    31. 31. Fixed Residential Broadband Prices (Average in the U.S.) Average Monthly Price $(2011 PPP*) Rank Among OECD and other Countries with Developed Broadband Markets Average Monthly Price of a Broadband Package $69.75 32nd out of 38 Download speed of 1-5 Mbps $34.93 14th out of 24 Download speed of 5-15 Mbps $43.71 21st out of 33 Download speed of 5-15 Mbps $56.50 26th out of 32 Source: The National Broadband Plan Goals: Where Do We Stand? http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43016.pdf 31
    32. 32. Dunn County Example http://wisconsindashboard.org/console/infograph
    33. 33. Cost Analysis http://www.verizonwireless.com/wcms/consumer/shop/shop-data- plans/more-everything.html Verizon Wireless example: $375 + $15 * 35 GB = $900 per month for the heavy user using 85 GB per month. 33 According to a 2012 OPASTCO study, broadband users now consume 5-20 GB data per month on average, and heavy users consume 70-100 GB per month, with 10 percent of users consuming 90% of the bandwidth. Usage has increased eightfold within the last five years and is predicted to increase threefold again by 2016.Page 72, http://bbcmag.epubxp.com/title/13001
    34. 34. Cost Matters The current BadgerNet rate for a 1 Gbps WAN circuit ($11,652 per month) in Wisconsin is nearly ten times the national average price being paid by libraries ($1,272 per month). Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration BCN rate sheet: http://www.doa.state.wi.us/Documents/DET/Services%20and%20Rates/FY14_03.pdf Educational Superhighway, Connecting America’s Students: Opportunities for Action - An Analysis of E-rate Spending Offers Key Insights for Expanding Educational Opportunity, April, 2014, http://www.educationsuperhighway.org/uploads/1/0/9/4/10946543/esh_k12_e- rate_spending_report_april_2014.pdf
    35. 35. Fixed Contract Price vs. Competitive Bids? Source: Educational Superhighway, Connecting America’s Students: Opportunities for Action - An Analysis of E-rate Spending Offers Key Insights for Expanding Educational Opportunity, April, 2014, http://www.educationsuperhighway.org/uploads/1/0/9/4/10946543/esh_k12_e- rate_spending_report_april_2014.pdf
    36. 36. Build a CAN/Build Subscribership36
    37. 37. PSC’s Mobile Pulse Data Light Grey: DNR Pink: PSC Green: UW-Extension Blue: Local Government Yellow: EDCs Purple: DATCP Brown: Other Drive Test Volunteers 37
    38. 38. Strategies to Enhance Broadband See: http://broadband.uwex.edu/resources/regulations/ 38
    39. 39. Regulations and Policies  Develop a plan (more on the Comprehensive Plan…)  Adopt a resolution that states the broadband priorities for the County (Position the County for potential funding and partnerships)  Lease public infrastructure (towers, high rooftops, poles, water towers, road ROW’s, etc.  Public/Private Partnerships  Inform State Legislation/funding decisions  Facilitate conversations that connect consumers with providers 39
    40. 40. “Smart Growth” Comprehensive Plans See draft Comprehensive plan update for the Village of Weston: http://broadband.uwex.edu/wp- content/uploads/2014/05/Weston_compplan_broadband.pdf 40
    41. 41. Know Your Business Community …all of them…. http://youreconomy.org/
    42. 42. Education: Broadband Fairs… 42
    43. 43. Education & Outreach…  Build better understanding for the need for broadband  Increase digital literacy  Increase broadband adoption  BEEC Digital Leaders Program/ Broadband Boot Camps to build internal capacity 43
    44. 44. Know Available Funding Streams  Broadband Expansion Grant Program http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/ERF_public/Default.aspx  Farm Bill USDA https://agriculture.house.gov/bill/agricultural-act-2014  Rural Health Care Program http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-12- 150A1.doc
    45. 45.  Host a Broadband Listening Sessions  Attend a Broadband Boot Camp with a UWEX Educator (CNRED, Family Living, 4H, Ag)  Business Boot Camps  Utilize Existing BBEC Resources  Videos  Guides  Topic-segmented Library of Broadband and Education Resources (…..on it’s way….)  County-specific Resources http://broadband.uwex.edu/
    46. 46. QUESTIONS? Professor Andy Lewis, Broadband & Economic Development Specialist Broadband & E-Commerce Education Center Andy.lewis@ces.uwex.edu 608-890-4254 Jill Hietpas, Regional Broadband Educator Broadband & E-Commerce Education Center Jill.hietpas@ces.uwex.edu 715-839-4712

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