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2011.005.20 webinar6 connected communities_bccb
 

2011.005.20 webinar6 connected communities_bccb

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Slides for BCCB webinar "Connected Communities" 5.24.2011

Slides for BCCB webinar "Connected Communities" 5.24.2011

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  • ANDY (1 minute) Welcome, thank you for joining us for Connecting Communities – We have participants from X states or communities or something about who’s on the call Something about the format of the webinar – mix of presentations and local discussions/small group activities NOTE: NOTICED YOU RECOGNIZE FUNDING AND PROGRAM AT THE END BUT DO YOU NEED/WANT TO DO THAT UPFRONT TOO?
  • ANDY (1 minute) Who we are
  • ANDY (1 minute) Here’s what we’ll be covering today – content and how the session will work
  • BILL (2 minutes) Overview of the National eCommerce Extension Initiative, curriculum, intended audience, etc. Today we want to share with you pieces from that curriculum that include powerpoint presentations, resources and on-line learning modules for community leaders, decision makers, and persons ready to get started on connected communities projects. Your site facilitator should have also shared with you a copy of the Connected Communities Resource list with links to many other reports and resources.
  • BILL (2 minutes) Brief background about Connecting Communities resources Developed by William Shuffstall, Sheila Sager, Rae Montgomery, David Noonan Recently updated by Bill shuffstall, Andy Lewis, and Monica Babine
  • BILL (1 minute)
  • BILL (4 minutes) Connected communities not only have Access and Infrastructure, they are using it and creating content to be shared online. Connected Communities have high-speed Internet infrastructure and community members who have the skills and knowledge to use the Internet effectively. These communities understand the economic and social benefits that are possible as a result of being digitally connected. Connected Communities seek these benefits in different ways. Some want to use digital technologies to enhance their local workforce or attract new workers, tourists or businesses. Others look to the future and seek to provide an environment where their youth will want to return to live and work. Other communities seek to use digital technologies as a way to help build community within their community, using it as a way to help individuals with like interests find and associate with each other. Connected communities projects are any projects intended to increase the level of connectivity within the community as well as the awareness and understanding of why broadband is important. Broadband service has become a necessary infrastructure for economic and community development in the 21st Century global economy. The availability of affordable broadband services in a community does not ensure the community is truly connected. Connectivity also depends on the ability of organizations and individuals in the community to use the Internet and digital tools (computers, video teleconferencing, etc.) to meet their goals. Leaders in connected communities undertake projects that focus on developing all three components of connectedness: Broadband infrastructure Adoption and use of digital tools by residents Adoption and use of digital tools by organizations Connected communities are proactive. They are not sitting back ignoring digital opportunities or waiting for the opportunities to come to them. They organize themselves, carefully consider their future, and go after it.
  • BILL (2 minutes) 15 minute activity BEFORE WE GET TOO FAR INTO THE PROGRAM TODAY LET’S TAKE A FEW MINUTES TO FIND OUT IF YOUR COMMUNITY IS READY TO BECOME A CONNECTED COMMUNITY. We need to spend some time thinking about the social capital within our communities. Most communities that have been waiting for someone else to take care of the “problem” are underserved when it comes to broadband. Pro-active communities take the time to figure the broadband needs of the communities and the alternatives available to meet those needs. That usually requires a number of different stakeholders within the community. The people side of broadband connectivity cannot be under-estimated! We are going to introduce you to one of the assessment tools available on the National E-commerce web site. We have just 15 minutes for this activity and your site facilitator will lead you through this short activity. Please watch the timer on screen as we will continue with the program when the timer expires in 15 minutes. Please raise your hand when we get to the 1 minute mark to let us know that you have rejoined us!
  • BILL (2 minutes) Welcome Back…..Please raise your hand to let us know that you have rejoined the program Introduce poll Share results Looks like we are ready to learn about broadband and how we can become a connected community (or something like that)
  • BILL (2 minutes) Leaders and citizens in connected communities understand what is going on in the world around them and how that impacts the community. They work proactively to take advantage of those changes in a positive fashion.
  • ANDY (1 minute) Provide broad definition of broadband 32 minutes at this point
  • ANDY (2 minutes) There are many different types of broadband delivery technologies. Each of them deliver similar services to consumers and businesses. The broadband technologies can be separated into two categories. Wired broadband is delivered through some type of wire to the home or office. Wireless broadband uses radio waves to deliver the service. The Connecting Communities Curriculum has
  • ANDY (1 minute) Consumers don’t always get what they pay for. NOTE: I LIKE THE VISUAL DEVELOPED BY THE FORMER WA BROADBAND OFFICE SLIDE ABOUT SPEED BECAUSE IT IS MORE VISUAL BUT THIS ONE DOES PROVIDE BETTER INFORMATION – JUST WISH THERE WAS A WAY TO MAKE THIS MORE VISUALLY APPEALING. I CUT THE “SWITCH Slide” BUT I’D COVER THE CONTENT FROM THAT SLIDE HERE: “ Rather than getting wrapped up in the federal definition of broadband, a better definition might be the bandwidth that is needed to run applications without limitations. The needs of a hospital are going to be much greater than the needs of a resident.”
  • ANDY (1 minute)
  • MONICA (1 minute)
  • Monica (1 minute) NOTE: WHAT ABOUT SOMETHING LIKE THIS THAT SPEAKS OF/TO RURAL COMMUNITIES? IT COULD ALSO BE SOMETHING ABOUT OUR GLOBAL, NETWORKED WORLD. YOU’LL SEE I REMOVED ALL THE INTERNATIONAL/NATIONAL INFORMATION – I MAY BE WRONG BUT THEY JUST SEEMED OFF-TARGET FOR OUR AUDIENCE – MORE APPROPRIATE FOR POLICY MAKERS, OUR COLLEAGUES, ETC. IF YOU DISAGREE, ADD BACK IN (BUT I’D RECOMMEND NOT ALL OF THEM).
  • Monica (3 minutes) NOTE: BRIEF EXAMPLES/CASE STUDIES OF A FEW OF THESE WOULD BE HELPFUL TO INSURE EVERYONE KNOWS WHAT WE MEAN BY CERTAIN TERMS AND SO THEY UNDERSTAND HOW IT MIGHT BE SOMETHING THAT IS RELEVANT/IMPORTANT TO THEM. WE COULD EVEN ADD A SLIDE OR TWO FEATURING EXAMPLES IF AVAILABLE AND APPROPRIATE.
  • Monica (1 minute) Businesses and residents will be less likely to locate in communities with no or limited broadband. College grads are less likely live in homes without broadband access Communities with out broadband service are less likely to attract young people or retiring baby boomers. Quality of Life Sustainability Public Safety
  • MONICA (2 minutes) Limited providers…..unavailable in some communities! Bandwidth Limits Applications….BIG PIPES CAI’s that use broadband often require a higher level of service and dedicated connections with guaranteed bandwidth, synchronous connections (the same up and download speeds). These types of connections are a available in rural areas but they are considerably more expensive than in urban areas. What organizations in the community use or need this level of broadband service? Who provides the service to our community? What does the service cost? How does cost for commercial broadband service compare to the cost in urban areas?
  • BILL (1 minute) NOTE: HERE’S WHERE I THINK WE ARE REALLY GETTING TO THE INFORMATION THEY WANT TO KNOW ABOUT. IF I HAD MORE TIME TO WORK ON THIS, DO RECOMMEND THIS SESSION BE A VERY FEW SLIDES ABOUT WHAT BROADBAND IS, A FEW SLIDES ABOUT WHY IT MATTERS (AND I USE CASE STUDIES) AND THEN I’D BEEF UP THIS HOW SECTION BECAUSE THIS IS WHAT PROBABLY IS OF MOST INTEREST TO FOLKS. So how do you make sure your community isn’t “digitally excluded” but a Connected Community?
  • BILL (2 minutes) In many ways, the process for becoming a connected community follows the steps necessary when you undertake any community project. Here’s an example of a typical project cycle. The process of becoming a connected community can take a few months or a number of years. It all depends on what the community leaders want to accomplish. A community that already has a fairly strong broadband infrastructure may spend just a few months educating community members about using the Internet. A community with no broadband connection may need years to design, fund and deploy a high-speed network before moving on to other goals No matter the size of the project a community undertakes, the process is the same: Learn, Assess, Vision, Design, Implement, Evaluate.
  • BILL (4 minutes) So now that you have begun forming your team and are learning about broadband, you are already on your way to becoming a connected community. These are the steps to a connected community. Again, other than #2, they probably look similar to those you have taking when working on projects in your community. NOTE: ANOTHER OPTION WOULD BE TO HAVE THIS SLIDE AS THE FINAL ONE BEFORE THE Q&A SLIDE/SECTION. POSITIONING IT THERE WOULD ALLOW IT BE A SUMMARY OF THE STEPS THEY WILL TAKE TO BECOME A CONNECTED COMMUNITY.
  • ANDY (1 minute introduction/15 minute activity) As with any successful project, leadership is critical. This will help you identify potential leadership team members for your connected community efforts. You will have 15 minutes to work on this worksheet.Turn over to t the local facilitators to lead the session. 1:06 after this activity
  • ANDY (1 minute)
  • ANDY (2 minutes) Leaders in connected communities understand how technology can positively improve the community’s social and economic well-being and the impacts of being left on the wrong side of the digital divide. Local governments in connected communities adopt and support polices that enhance technology access and adoption. Economic development leaders in connected communities implement strategies that enable local business and industries to survive and thrive in the knowledge economy. Community and technology leaders work together to improve the community’s digital capabilities – pooling financial resources and human capital (I.T. staff)
  • ANDY (1 minute) To take these steps you may need more resources and many of these are available though the National e-Commerce Extension Initiative on the Connecting Communities section of the website.
  • ANDY (1 minute) Here’s an example of one of the many resources available in the Connecting Communities curriculum. For the assessment process, the Connecting Communities curriculum has several Benchmarking assessment tools that provide a snapshot of your community use of the Internet and digital tools. These tools provide information critical to setting goals for your connected community and identifying projects that you can implement to reach those goals. Community Internet Access and Infrastructure Assessment (PDF): This quick start assessment tool identifies the types of Internet connections and bandwidth available to the community's residents, businesses and the public sector. Community Use of Digital Technology (PDF) This tool provides a quick assessment of how individuals, businesses and the public sector are using digital technologies. Community Digital Initiatives Inventory This tool provides a quick assessment of what digital initiatives are underway or being discussed in the community.
  • ANDY (1 minute) on-line learning modules for community leaders, decision makers, and persons ready to get started on connected communities projects.
  • ANDY (2 minutes) NOTE: DEVELOP A WRAP UP THAT SAYS SOMETHING LIKE USING THE CONNECTING COMMUNITIES RESOURCES CAN HELP YOU BECOME A CONNECTED COMMUNITY….AND WHEN YOU DO, THIS IS WHAT THE CONNECTIONS MIGHT LOOK LIKE… 1:14 (10-15 minutes for questions)
  • Q&A (LED BY ANDY, I’M ASSUMING SINCE WE ARE DOING THIS ON YOUR DIME) Questions related to the steps of becoming a connected community. Please complete the evaluations.
  • Andy Thank you for attending.

2011.005.20 webinar6 connected communities_bccb 2011.005.20 webinar6 connected communities_bccb Presentation Transcript

  • Connecting Communities May 24, 10:00 – 11:30 CST This program was brought to you by the “Building Community Capacity (BCCB) through Broadband” Project .
  • William Shuffstall, Senior Extension Educator, Penn State University Monica L. Babine, Senior Associate, Program for Digital Initiatives Division of Governmental Studies & Services, Washington State University Extension & College of Liberal Arts Andy Lewis, Community and Economic Development Manager for the Building Community Capacity through Broadband (BCCB) initiative.
  • Agenda
    • Introduction to the Connecting
    • Communities Resources
    • What are Connected Communities?
    • What is Broadband?
    • Why Broadband Matters
    • How to Become a Connected
    • Community
  • http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/learningcenter/ The National e-Commerce Initiative
  •  
    • What are Connected Communities?
  • Connected Communities
    • Have IT
    • Use IT
    • Create IT
    Access & Infrastructure Applications & Education Community Content
  • Small Group Activity #1: Community Readiness Assessment
  • Poll
    • Welcome Back!
    • Overall, what level was your community at for question #3 (How do leaders in the community react to change?)
    • One (1)
    • Two (2)
    • Three (3)
    • Four (4)
  • The Community Embraces Change
    • Track global economic and social trends
    • Discussion about the impact of trends on the community
    • Know community values, assets, strengths and weaknesses
    • Implement projects to:
      • Take advantage of change
      • Minimize negative impacts of change
  • What is Broadband?
  • Types of Broadband
    • Wired:
    • Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL)
    • Cable Modem
    • Leased Lines (T1)
    • Fiber Optic Cable
    • Broadband Over Powerline (BPL)
    • Wireless :
    • Satellite
    • Fixed Wireless
    • Wi-Fi
    • WiMAX
    • Cell (G3,G4)
  • Comparison of Download Speeds
  • For More General Broadband Information
    • Learning Module on Broadband Technologies:
    • http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/curricula/connecting_communities/module2_3.htm
    • Powerpoint on Types of Broadband:
    • http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/curricula/ connecting_communities/module3_1.htm
    • Why Broadband Matters
    • "Investments in rural broadband networks
    • create jobs and economic opportunity for
    • rural America. Broadband is critical
    • communications infrastructure of the 21st
    • century, and it is vital to building vibrant
    • rural communities.”
    • USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack
  • Broadband Uses
      • Education
      • eCommerce
      • Culture and entertainment
      • Telehealth/telemedicine
      • eGovernment
      • Public safety
      • Economic development/opportunity
  • Broadband – The Community Perspective
    • Global economy driven by broadband
    • Businesses less likely to locate or grow without broadband
    • Ability to attract workforce/Reduce impact of brain drain
  • Broadband Challenges
    • Higher cost in rural vs. urban/suburban areas
    • Limited providers in rural areas
    • Bandwidth limits applications
    • Reliability/Redundancy
    • Adoption
    • Access & Ability to use digital tools
    • How to Become a Connected Community
  •  
  • Steps to Becoming a Connected Community
    • Form a team
    • Learn about broadband
    • Assess what you have
    • Design the future
    • Create an action plan
    • Implement and evaluate
    • Tell your story
  • Small Group Activity #2
    • Leadership Team Member Identification Worksheet
    • Leaders (formal and non-formal)
    • Technology experts
  • Poll
    • In general, how difficult was it to identify leaders within the various stakeholder groups?
    • Extremely difficult
    • Difficult
    • Not so difficult
    • We just hit the “easy button”
  • Leadership is Engaged
    • Community leaders understand importance of technology access and adoption
    • Government policies support technology access and adoption
    • Knowledge economy based economic development strategy
    • Community and technology leaders support activities that improve the community’s digital capabilities
  • http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/learningcenter/
  • Community Benchmarking Assessment Tools:
    • Community Internet Access and Infrastructure Assessment (PDF)
    • Community Use of Digital Technology (PDF)
    • Community Digital Initiatives Inventory
    • http :// srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/curricula/connecting_communities/module1_3.htm
  • Other Connecting Communities Resources
    • PPTs
    • Case Studies
    • Public Policy Information
    • Research
    • Resource List
    • Learning Modules
  • Connecting: Homes, Businesses and Community Institutions
  • Questions? Forming a team Learning about broadband Assessing what you have Designing the future Creating an action plan Implementation and evaluation Telling your story
  • This program was brought to you by the “Building Community Capacity (BCCB) through Broadband” Project. For more information: Andy Lewis, Community and Economic Development Manager, Office of Broadband Sustainability, University of Wisconsin Extension, [email_address] , 608-890-4254 Connecting Rural Communities