Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Young Onset Dementia & Issues in the Workplace
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Young Onset Dementia & Issues in the Workplace

261
views

Published on

Pat Wilson, Family Support Coordinator, Alzheimer's & Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin

Pat Wilson, Family Support Coordinator, Alzheimer's & Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin

Published in: Health & Medicine

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
261
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Misdiagnosis – often misdiagnosed with mental illness, causes extra strain on relationships
    Children living at home – PWD may still be a caregiver of children at home – may mention children’s issues
    Eligibility for benefits – some benefits/services are only for those over 65, have to seek out services they are eligible for
    Work-related issues – PWD may still be working and/or their spouse may still be working
    Loss of finances
    Loss of benefits
  • Person in the early stage can still be independent with adaptations and supports in the workplace:
    Experience and knowledge of the agency/organization mission, services and responsibilities
    Need to follow the American Disability Act
  • Check with Human Resources – supervisor to inform that there may be someone with dementia & what are guidelines/criteria to follow
    Informal, friendly environment – so person doesn’t feel put on the spot
    Simple agenda asking employee, “How are you feeling about work?” “Are you noticing any concerns or issues that you are having?” Wait for response, give person time to reply.
    Then direct supervisor states what s/he has noticed
    Problem solve what can be done to improve on the work responsibilities deficits & set goals
  • Medical evaluation and treatment plan – a thorough evaluation and accurate diagnosis is vital
    Education and support – education programs, support groups
    Legal and financial assistance – Power of Attorney for Health Care/Finances
    Social Security Disability Insurance (if leaving employment) – can apply online through Social Security website or call 1-800-772-1213, person may be eligible for “Compassionate Allowance” which speeds up the waiting period so person may get benefits within days of filing
    Adaptation options – Does the person want to continue to work? Is that feasible? Then you can discuss possible adaptation options in the workplace.
  • Non-technological & natural supports
    Co-worker as mentor and support
    Change in environment or work responsibilities – move to quieter office, part time vs full time, PWD as mentor, cues, shared work with employees, focus on strengths and change responsibilities based on weaknesses
    Assistive technology (AT)
    Any product or piece of equipment used to maintain or improve the functional capabilities of people with disabilities (e.g., voice recognition software so person doesn’t have to type, electronic task organizers, recording devices, timers or alarms, computer software that can help organize or simplify tasks)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Young Onset Dementia & Issues in the Workplace Pat Wilson, Family Support Coordinator Alzheimer’s & Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin
    • 2. Young onset dementia statistics • Estimated young-onset Alzheimer’s (under 65) o 200,000 people in the U.S. • Estimated young-onset dementia (under 65) o As many as 640,000 people in U.S.
    • 3. Special issues with young onset dementia • Misdiagnosis • Children living at home • Aging parents • Eligibility for benefits and services • Work-related issues – Loss of finances – Loss of benefits
    • 4. Special issues with young onset dementia (continued) • Loss of intimacy • Spouse/partner working or not working • Financial commitments • Usually physically fit and active • Emotions
    • 5. Value of employee retention • Person in the early stages can still be independent with supports • American Disabilities Act
    • 6. How to approach an employee about your concerns • • • • • Check with Human Resources Informal, friendly environment Simple agenda (“How are you feeling about work?”) Get direct supervisor’s input Problem solve what can be done & set goals
    • 7. Talking to an employee about what can be done to help • Medical evaluation and treatment plan • Education and support • Legal and financial assistance • Social Security Disability Insurance (if leaving employment) • Adaptation options
    • 8. Adaptation options in the workplace • Non-technological & natural supports o Co-worker as mentor and support o Change in environment or work responsibilities • Assistive technology (AT) o Any product or piece of equipment used to maintain or improve the functional capabilities of people with disabilities