Specific Challenges of Salvage & Oil Lightering in Remote Arctic Locations

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  • Before we get started do a little background
  • Sincerity, honesty and professionalism in dealing with employees, clients, and partners;Safety in the workplace through competency, management, corporate culture and our philosophy of TEAMwork;Individual professional pride and passion for our craft, our company and our industry
  • PNW offices in Seattle, Anacortes and Portland
  • KULLUK – Sub to Smit SalvagePOLAR WIND - Served as the Incident Commander in the Unified Command. Global oversaw and directed all aspects of salvage effortsDEEP SEA – Mitigated pollution, raised and disposed of the vesselHydrogen Reactor – Engineered and implemented salvage planSqualicum – Tragic fire with two fatalities. Worked with local authorities to preserve the sceneMONTEBELLO – Assessment of WWII oil tanker lying in 900’ 6 miles offshore CA.
  • KULLUK – Sub to Smit SalvagePOLAR WIND - Served as the Incident Commander in the Unified Command. Global oversaw and directed all aspects of salvage effortsDEEP SEA – Mitigated pollution, raised and disposed of the vesselHydrogen Reactor – Engineered and implemented salvage planSqualicum – Tragic fire with two fatalities. Worked with local authorities to preserve the sceneMONTEBELLO – Assessment of WWII oil tanker lying in 900’ 6 miles offshore CA.
  • KULLUK – Sub to Smit SalvagePOLAR WIND - Served as the Incident Commander in the Unified Command. Global oversaw and directed all aspects of salvage effortsDEEP SEA – Mitigated pollution, raised and disposed of the vesselHydrogen Reactor – Engineered and implemented salvage planSqualicum – Tragic fire with two fatalities. Worked with local authorities to preserve the sceneMONTEBELLO – Assessment of WWII oil tanker lying in 900’ 6 miles offshore CA.
  • KULLUK – Sub to Smit SalvagePOLAR WIND - Served as the Incident Commander in the Unified Command. Global oversaw and directed all aspects of salvage effortsDEEP SEA – Mitigated pollution, raised and disposed of the vesselHydrogen Reactor – Engineered and implemented salvage planSqualicum – Tragic fire with two fatalities. Worked with local authorities to preserve the sceneMONTEBELLO – Assessment of WWII oil tanker lying in 900’ 6 miles offshore CA.
  • KULLUK – Sub to Smit SalvagePOLAR WIND - Served as the Incident Commander in the Unified Command. Global oversaw and directed all aspects of salvage effortsDEEP SEA – Mitigated pollution, raised and disposed of the vesselHydrogen Reactor – Engineered and implemented salvage planSqualicum – Tragic fire with two fatalities. Worked with local authorities to preserve the sceneMONTEBELLO – Assessment of WWII oil tanker lying in 900’ 6 miles offshore CA.
  • Speak to the crane issues
  • Point out the break seam.
  • A total of 4 tugs were used to refloat the vessel on Sept 14 and towed to Port Epworth for survey and repairs. Then on to Cambridge Bay on Sept 17 for redelivery.

Transcript

  • 1. Kerry WalshSalvage MasterMarine Casualty Project ManagerGlobal Diving & Salvage, Inc.
  • 2. Marine Construction• Founded in 1979• Presently over 350 employeesAbout Global
  • 3. • Regional Offices– Alaska– California– Gulf Coast– Pacific Northwest
  • 4. Marine Construction• Staff and manage complexcasualty response projects —from planning and design tofield execution• Emergency Responses for:– vessels in distress– lightering operations– casualty containment– environmental mitigation• Resource for oilremoval, recovery, and disposalCasualty Response
  • 5. Recent projects:• Drilling Rig KULLUK – Strand - Kodiak Island, AK
  • 6. Recent projects:• Drilling Rig KULLUK – Strand - Kodiak Island, AK• T/V POLAR WIND & Barge UNIMAK TRADER – Strand - Ulkolnoi Island, AK
  • 7. Recent projects:• Drilling Rig KULLUK – Strand - Kodiak Island, AK• T/V POLAR WIND & Barge UNIMAK TRADER – Strand - Ulkolnoi Island, AK• F/V DEEP SEA – Sunk – Penn Cove, Whidbey Island, WA
  • 8. Recent projects:• Drilling Rig KULLUK – Strand - Kodiak Island, AK• T/V POLAR WIND & Barge UNIMAK TRADER – Strand - Ulkolnoi Island, AK• F/V DEEP SEA – Sunk – Penn Cove, Whidbey Island, WA• Hydrogen Reactor Salvage – Cherry Point, WA
  • 9. Recent projects:• Drilling Rig KULLUK – Strand - Kodiak Island, AK• T/V POLAR WIND & Barge UNIMAK TRADER – Strand - Ulkolnoi Island, AK• F/V DEEP SEA – Sunk – Penn Cove, Whidbey Island, WA• Hydrogen Reactor Salvage – Cherry Point, WA• Assessment of the wreck of the MONTEBELLO – Cambria, CA
  • 10. Marine Construction• Serving the offshore oil andgas industry in the Gulf ofMexico, Alaska andinternationally• Support services forplatforms, pipelines, etc.• Surface and Saturation DiveSystems capable to 1000FSW and configured toaccommodate a variety ofdeck layout plansOffshore Support
  • 11. Marine Construction• Serving:– Marine & Civil Construction& Engineering Markets– Federal, State, Municipal &Private Sector• In house engineering, designand fabrication capabilities• Fleet of ROVs andexperiencedpilots, Sonar, BathometryConstructionEngineering & Technology
  • 12. 6,640 miles of coastlineincluding islands - 33,904 miles of shoreline
  • 13. Industries & Resources utilizing theMarine Environment in Alaska• Oil/Gas – Cook Inlet and Arctic operations• Mining – Red Dog, near shore Nome, SE Alaska• Timber – Southeast and south central• Fishing/Aquaculture – All coastal waters• Tourism – Primarily SE, south central and, lately, the Arctic• Cargo Vessels – Ships and barges hauling freight to andfrom Alaska• Vessels in Transit – Ships and barges transiting the GreatCircle route pass through the Aleutians
  • 14. Vessel Traffic North Pacific & AlaskaOne Day in April 2013
  • 15. NomePoint BarrowMarine Exchange of AlaskaArctic Maritime Activity in 2012
  • 16. M/V STRYKER Salvage
  • 17. M/V STRYKER Salvage
  • 18. M/V STRYKER Salvage• Casualty occurred at approximately 1130 on September14, 2010• Vessel reported that the wheelhouse partially separatedfrom the vessel due to structural failure. Stern resting onthe seafloor• 40 Miles West of Prudhoe Bay on the east side of theColville River Delta. N70°31’19”, W150°5’44”
  • 19. M/V STRYKER Salvage• Owners engaged Global to respond immediately to affectsalvage of the vessel. Salvage Master mobilized fromPortland and salvage crew and equipment fromAnchorage.• Owners reported having engaged 2 shallow draft tugsand a crane barge to assist.• Salvage crew and gear arrived at and boarded thecasualty at 1700 September 16.
  • 20. M/V STRYKER Salvage•
  • 21. M/V STRYKER Salvage• Self Propelled barge constructed from 20 Flexifloatmodular barges• 140’ x 40’ with maximum draft of 7’• Twin 671 Detroit Diesel engines
  • 22. M/V STRYKER Salvage• Stern rests hard abottom in 14 feet of water• Bottom consists of thick, sticky mud• Heavily damaged pins marginally holding the vesseltogether at the break• Forward section badly wasted with no integrity
  • 23. M/V STRYKER Salvage•
  • 24. M/V STRYKER Salvage•
  • 25. M/V STRYKER Salvage•
  • 26. M/V STRYKER Salvage
  • 27. M/V STRYKER SalvageChallenges –Remote location with extremely volatile weather. Airfreight of gear and access to casualty weatherdependent.Floating resources were available but lacking incapability – i.e. Crane barge with no ability to moor.Casualty located very near Iñupiat village on the ColvilleRiver Delta – impact to subsistenceWildlife - Polar Bears
  • 28. M/V STRYKER SalvagePositives –Access to all of the resources available in Deadhorse andPrudhoe Bay.Lodging and transportation at nearby base camp.Alaska Clean Seas for on water support and pollutionresponse.Excellent logistics support.Internet and telephone communications.
  • 29. M/V STRYKER Salvage
  • 30. M/V CLIPPER ADVENTURER• 331’ vessel grounded on Friday, August 27, 2010 in a remotebay in northern Canada.• The location is exposed to strong weather fronts generatingsignificant wind and ocean swells.• A total of 13 double bottom tanks were breeched. The extentof the damage was from the fore peak to well aft of amidships.
  • 31. M/V CLIPPER ADVENTURERCLIPPER ANDVENTURER
  • 32. M/V CLIPPER ADVENTURERCasualtyCommand Post380 MilesSafe Harbor220 miles
  • 33. M/V CLIPPER ADVENTURER
  • 34. M/V CLIPPER ADVENTURERPort EpworthCambridge Bay
  • 35. M/V CLIPPER ADVENTURERChallenges –Onshore command centre at Yellowknife which is severalhundred miles from the location.Poor communications with satellite service unstable that farnorth.Logistically difficult due to the remoteness of the location withno “local” services to support the operation.Transportation to/from site was limited to float planes withmarginal fuel capacity for the distance travelled
  • 36. M/V CLIPPER ADVENTURERAircraft landings on site was weather dependent. On occasionsthe weather would change after the aircraft was in flight.Unpredictable weather systems which may not be forecast byweather service.Inadequate support vessels / bollard pull available.No border custom clearance point in the Canadian Arctic whichmeant that equipment mob and demob were “challenging”.Limited season to work due to short arctic summers.
  • 37. AIS Receiver Locations in Alaska
  • 38. AIS Receiver Locations in Canada
  • 39. Arctic OperationsFuture Efforts are Necessary• Recognize that the Arctic marine environment will beaffected by International trade and vessel transits• Best engineering practices for new infrastructure• Pre-stage gear with applicable plans for mobilizationand cascading of equipment and resources• Cooperative efforts that combine available resourcesand technologies with Area Contingency Plans• Continued analysis of specific case projects• Continued assessment of various locations utilizingsubject matter experts coupled with local knowledge
  • 40. Conclusions• The Arctic is unique with regard to area and responsecapabilities• New operations, exploration and development offerthe US and Canada an opportunity to engineer andplan for emergency response using newertechnologies and lessons learned elsewhereEmphasis should be given to Preventionto reduce the need for Response