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5th estate presentation to CRASSH, Cambridge
 

5th estate presentation to CRASSH, Cambridge

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Presentation on the Fifth Estate of the Internet Realm to CRASSH at the University of Cambridge on 24 February 2011

Presentation on the Fifth Estate of the Internet Realm to CRASSH at the University of Cambridge on 24 February 2011

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    5th estate presentation to CRASSH, Cambridge 5th estate presentation to CRASSH, Cambridge Presentation Transcript

    • The Fifth Estate of the Internet Realm
      William H. Dutton
      Oxford Internet Institute (OII)
      University of Oxford
      www.ox.ac.uk
      (John Moore, Getty Images)
      Presentation for The Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), organized by the Cambridge Digital Humanities Network, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge University, 24 February 2011.
    • The Political Significance of the Internet and Social Media?
      • Technical Novelty–passing fad, not relevant (not ubiquitous), or not ‘real’
      • Deterministic Technology of Freedom or Control
      • Reinforcement Politics – Internet Freedom an Illusion?
      • A Strategic Resource for Reconfiguring Access [enabling a Fifth Estate]
    • Key Questions Concerning the Politics of the Digital Age
      • How is the Internet being used to ‘reconfigure access’? Are there discernable patterns?
      • Does the Internet enable key actors to reconfigure access in ways that enhance their ‘communicative power’?
    • The Fourth Estate
      “[Edmund] Burke said there were Three Estates in Parliament; but, in the Reporters’ Gallery yonder, there sat a Fourth Estate more prominent far than they all. It is not a figure of speech, or witty saying; it is a literal fact – very momentous to us in these times.”
      Thomas Carlyle (1831), Heroes and Hero-Worship, at www.gutenberg.org.etext/1091
    • Feudal Estates into the 21st Century
    • The Fourth and Fifth Estates
      • Press since the 18th Century - the ‘Fourth Estate’
      • Internet in the 21st - enabling a Fifth Estate
      −−
      Enabling people to network with other individuals and with information, services and technical resources in ways that support social accountability in business and industry, government, politics, and the media.
    • Based on a Range of OII Research
      • Studies of the political implications of information and communication technologies, like the Internet
      • Distributed Problem-Solving Networks, supported by McKinsey
      • Oxford eSocial Science Project (OeSS), supported by the ESRC
      • Oxford Internet Surveys (OxIS), part of the World Internet Project
      • Global Internet Values Survey with INSEAD, ComScore, WEF
    • Oxford Internet Surveys
      • 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009
      • Cross-sectional Surveys versus Panels
      • Multi-Stage Probability Sample
      • England, Scotland & Wales
      • Respondents: 14 years and older
      • Face-to-face Interviews, High Response Rates
      • Sponsorship for 2009 from the British Library, Higher Education Funding Council for England, Ofcom, and Scottish and Southern Energy
      • Component of World Internet Project (WIP)
    • OxIS Samples
    • Looking for Information on Different Media (QA1)
      OxIS 2005: N=2,185; OxIS 2007: N=2,350; OxIS2009: N=2,013.
      12
    • Pattern of Findings Supporting Conception of Networked Individuals
    • Average Importance of Media for Information by Internet Users and Non-Users (QA2 by QH14)
      OxIS 2009: N=2,013
      14
    • Centrality of the Internet and Trust over Time
      OxIS 2003: N=2,029; OxIS 2005: N=2,185; OxIS 2007 N=2,350. OxIS 2009: N=2,013
    • Networked Institutions v Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate
      • Networked Institutions, such as in e-Health
      • Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate:
      • going to the Internet for health and medical information
      • networking physicians via Sermo
    • Sermo
    • Networked Institutions v Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate
    • Networked Institutions v Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate
      • Networked Institutions: greater ubiquity, universal access
      • Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate: require only a critical mass of users
    • Percentage of Internet Users Across Regions of the World
    • Regions as Percentage of the Worldwide Population of Users
    • 18th Century Estates: 21st Century Enemies
    • Centrality of the Internet, Trust in Government and Attitudes toward Internet Regulation over Time
      OxIS 2003: N=2,029; OxIS 2005: N=2,185; OxIS 2007 N=2,350. OxIS 2009: N=2,013
    • The Fifth Estate: A Sensitizing Concept
    • The Fifth Estate of the Internet Realm
      William H. Dutton
      Oxford Internet Institute (OII)
      University of Oxford
      www.ox.ac.uk
      (John Moore, Getty Images)
      Presentation for The Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), organized by the Cambridge Digital Humanities Network, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge University, 24 February 2011.